ugith21's Laptop recommendation thread Watch

ugith21
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ugith21's Laptop recommendation thread


Budget
More than £1000

Subject being studied
Mechanical Engineering

Software that will be used
SolidWorks, MATLAB

Screen size
14 inches

Operating system preference
Windows

Minimum amount of RAM
16GB

Minimum storage requirement
512 GB

Weight limit
3 lbs

Used for playing games?
No

If yes, what games?


Touchscreen needed?
Don't mind

Are there any specific ports you need?
USB type C, USB 3.0

What devices do you have currently?
Asus 15.6'' Pentium Processor

Laptops researched:
Laptop 1 - Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon

Laptop 2 - Dell XPS 15

Laptop 3 - Razer Blade 15

Additional Comments:
My maximum budget is £1500. I would prefer 14 inch screen size but don't mind 15 inches. Portability is very important.
Last edited by ugith21; 1 month ago
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CollegeStudent99
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Lol, you don’t need a machine that powerful just for that software.

I bought my Dell Latitude D530 Laptop with 3gb of RAM and a 2.4GHZ Core 2 Duo Processor off eBay for just £95 plus postage costs.

Just buy something like this and spend the rest of your budget on clothes or a new phone or summat:

g[/s]Xq0AAOSwdZJcYCXr]https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/HP-14-inch-laptop-1TB-HDD-4GB-RAM-Intel-Celeron/163657158794?hash=item261aba108a:g:Xq0AAOSwdZJcYCXr

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Lenovo-Th...91b4%7Ciid%3A1

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Thinkpad-...91b4%7Ciid%3A1


If more storage is needed just get an external hard drive.
Last edited by CollegeStudent99; 1 month ago
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jameswhughes
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(Original post by CollegeStudent99)
Lol, you don’t need a machine that powerful just for that software.

I bought my Dell Latitude D530 Laptop with 3gb of RAM and a 2.4GHZ Core 2 Duo Processor off eBay for just £95 plus postage costs.

Just buy something like this and spend the rest of your budget on clothes or a new phone or summat:

g[/s]Xq0AAOSwdZJcYCXr]https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/HP-14-inch-laptop-1TB-HDD-4GB-RAM-Intel-Celeron/163657158794?hash=item261aba108a:g:Xq0AAOSwdZJcYCXr

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Lenovo-Th...91b4%7Ciid%3A1

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Thinkpad-...91b4%7Ciid%3A1


If more storage is needed just get an external hard drive.
I'm sure I mentioned this before, but recommending laptops from as long ago as 2006 is just terrible advice.
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Acsel
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(Original post by ugith21)
ugith21's Laptop recommendation thread


Budget
More than £1000

Subject being studied
Mechanical Engineering

Software that will be used
SolidWorks, MATLAB

Screen size
14 inches

Operating system preference
Windows

Minimum amount of RAM
16GB

Minimum storage requirement
512 GB

Weight limit
3 lbs

Used for playing games?
No

If yes, what games?


Touchscreen needed?
Don't mind

Are there any specific ports you need?
USB type C, USB 3.0

What devices do you have currently?
Asus 15.6'' Pentium Processor

Laptops researched:
Laptop 1 - Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon

Laptop 2 - Dell XPS 15

Laptop 3 - Razer Blade 15

Additional Comments:
My maximum budget is £1500. I would prefer 14 inch screen size but don't mind 15 inches. Portability is very important.
Your weight requirement is a bit unreasonable, I think the X1 Carbon is the only device that even gets close. Most 13.3 inch ultrabooks struggle to hit that weight, with most ultra portable 15.6 inch devices coming in closer to 2Kg (which is still very lightweight all things considered).

Any of the laptops you've looked at are good choices, and really represent some of the very few options in the portable powerhouse department. In terms of a comparison between them:

The Thinkpad is noticeably more expensive for what you get. Starting at £1450 for just an 8250U, onboard graphics, a 256GB SSD and 8GB RAM it's substantially less powerful than the other devices. It is however much lighter, at only 1.1Kg, while also being a 14 inch laptop. IMO that price bump is not worth the slight decrease in weight and substantial decrease in power compared to the XPS 15 or Razer Blade. To get something comparatively powerful, you're looking at an X1 Extreme, which again is more expensive. It's unfortunate, as I really like the laptop but at this price it's tough to sell.

That leaves the Blade 15 and XPS 15. Unlike the Blade, the XPS is showing it's age a little and is still sporting a 1050Ti GPU. If you wanted to game, this may be an issue, but you want it for MechEng. You may or may not be able to take advantage of GPU acceleration, but either way the 1050Ti will more than suffice. The cheapest Blade is rocking a 1060 Max Q by comparison, so not a huge bump.

Looking purely at the entry level models:
The Blade costs £1480 whereas the XPS 15 is currently £1330 (ignoring the i5 model). You can get student discount on that, knocking it down to a mere £1200 which is an awfully good price.

The downside is that you only get 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage. However with the leftover budget you can easily upgrade that if needed later down the line; as far as I'm aware the XPS 15 still has upgradeable storage and RAM. The Blade on the other hand comes with a 128GB SSD and a 1TB HDD. The hard drive takes up battery space, so you'll get a smaller battery in this case.

Beyond that, most other specs are similar or don't matter. The weight is similar (dependent on whether you have a larger/small battery, HDD, etc.), both come with the same i7 8750H processor that absolutely trounces the 8250U in the Thinkpad and so on.

All in all, I'd go with the XPS 15. You can spend £1200 now and if you later decide that you need the extra storage and RAM that upgrade would only cost £100 to DIY, bringing the total up to £1300. Much better than the £1700 Dell are asking. It's a minor thing, but you can also go try an XPS 15 in a physical store to see if you like it. No such option with the Razer Blade.

So of the laptops listed (and TBH there aren't a whole lot of other options to begin with), the Thinkpad is unfortunately eliminated for being such a poor contender here. Between the Razer Blade and XPS 15, the win has to go to the XPS. It's cheaper (with or without the upgraded RAM and storage), and is otherwise on par with the Blade. The only place the Razer Blade beats it is the GPU and there's not a whole lot of difference between a 1050Ti and a 1060. Considering you don't want to game, and probably won't be making total use of GPU acceleration, the more budget XPS makes sense. I'm also not a fan of the Blades 128GB + 1TB option, since it eats into your battery capacity. With the XPS you have the option to just have a much bigger battery, alongside all round faster storage. All round it'd be tough to consider the Blade or Thinkpad over the XPS.

In terms of options besides those, we've already mentioned the Thinkpad X1 Extreme, which is again quite expensive. Custom machines would be an option, but these are typically heavier, not as nice to look at and probably not a whole lot different in price. The Asus Zenbook exists, but I'm not a huge fan of the design or the gimmicky touchpad screen. The Surface Book 2 is outside your budget and a MacBook would be silly. A pure gaming laptop may offer similar performance, but will skimp on the portability. So all round, I think you've already picked out the best options and I can't think of anything that can really compete with the XPS 15.

So the tl:dr is go for the XPS 15.
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Acsel
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(Original post by CollegeStudent99)
Lol, you don’t need a machine that powerful just for that software.

I bought my Dell Latitude D530 Laptop with 3gb of RAM and a 2.4GHZ Core 2 Duo Processor off eBay for just £95 plus postage costs.

Just buy something like this and spend the rest of your budget on clothes or a new phone or summat:
You can't possibly know how powerful a machine they need based on what they've told us. Intensive projects (and even casual projects) would laugh at a Celeron with 3GB of RAM.

The idea that someone shouldn't waste their money on an "overpowered" machine that will do the job and should instead waste the money on clothes or a new phone is kinda funny too.
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CollegeStudent99
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(Original post by Acsel)
You can't possibly know how powerful a machine they need based on what they've told us. Intensive projects (and even casual projects) would laugh at a Celeron with 3GB of RAM.

The idea that someone shouldn't waste their money on an "overpowered" machine that will do the job and should instead waste the money on clothes or a new phone is kinda funny too.
It's just that I can't understand why someone would need to spend so much on a laptop, when you can buy a decent one, brand new for £400-£500.

I'm actually quite a rich person, considering I'm a student, but even if I had a 6 figure salary I wouldn't want to spend that much on a laptop.

If the OP wants a powerful machine they might as well get a desktop as at least they are upgradeable, unlike a lot of modern laptops these days.
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Acsel
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(Original post by CollegeStudent99)
It's just that I can't understand why someone would need to spend so much on a laptop, when you can buy a decent one, brand new for £400-£500.

I'm actually quite a rich person, considering I'm a student, but even if I had a 6 figure salary I wouldn't want to spend that much on a laptop.

If the OP wants a powerful machine they might as well get a desktop as at least they are upgradeable, unlike a lot of modern laptops these days.
Need and want are different things. Some people just want to spend money and get a nice laptop, even if it doesn't outright perform better.

£500 laptops are fine for the average student, but it's not unusual for someone to want something more powerful. A £500 laptop won't get you 16GB of RAM, a ton of storage, a GPU, amazing build quality, etc. When money isn't an issue, it makes sense to buy the tool that best does the job. A £500 might well suffice for the OP, but it doesn't meet most of their requirements.

Agree on the desktop, but a lot of people would rather have a laptop. Both can be an option, although that can become a budget issue.

As someone who has spent close to that much on a laptop (and far more on a desktop), money is relative. A 6 figure salary is irrelevant if you don't think spending that much is a good idea. You could earn £1000 a month or a £1000 a day, wouldn't matter if you never wanted to spend that much on a laptop in the first place. If I were earning a 6 figure salary though, I'd have no qualms about spending money on the tool that does the job better. Because at the end of the day, an expensive device like an XPS 13, Surface Laptop, etc. is still a nicer than a £500 budget laptop. And an XPS 15, Razer Blade, etc. will outright perform better.
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jameswhughes
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(Original post by CollegeStudent99)
It's just that I can't understand why someone would need to spend so much on a laptop, when you can buy a decent one, brand new for £400-£500.

I'm actually quite a rich person, considering I'm a student, but even if I had a 6 figure salary I wouldn't want to spend that much on a laptop.

If the OP wants a powerful machine they might as well get a desktop as at least they are upgradeable, unlike a lot of modern laptops these days.
If you're so rich, why are you so opposed to spending money on better quality products?

I wouldn't even say an expensive computer is excessive if it lasts longer, I'm using a MacBook Pro from 2012 for example. If you're buying a new laptop it's worth paying a bit more for something good that lasts, instead of something cheaper which you'll want to replace earlier and would overall cost more money.

Saying people should spend their money on phones or clothes instead is in many ways a much bigger waste, as these things don't last nearly as long and can have massive premiums just for the sake of branding.
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CollegeStudent99
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So, has the OP decided what laptop they are going to get?
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ugith21
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(Original post by CollegeStudent99)
Lol, you don’t need a machine that powerful just for that software.

I bought my Dell Latitude D530 Laptop with 3gb of RAM and a 2.4GHZ Core 2 Duo Processor off eBay for just £95 plus postage costs.

Just buy something like this and spend the rest of your budget on clothes or a new phone or summat:

g[/s]Xq0AAOSwdZJcYCXr]https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/HP-14-inch-laptop-1TB-HDD-4GB-RAM-Intel-Celeron/163657158794?hash=item261aba108a:g:Xq0AAOSwdZJcYCXr

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Lenovo-Th...91b4%7Ciid%3A1

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Thinkpad-...91b4%7Ciid%3A1


If more storage is needed just get an external hard drive.
Thanks for your reply. The thing is my current laptop has a Celeron processor and 4GB RAM, and I can't even open Solidworks after downloading. Plus it took a whole weekend to download. The configuration you've suggested wouldn't be sufficient as I'm looking for an upgrade rather than a downgrade. LOL. I've saved up for this so I wouldn't spend my money on a new phone or clothes, as my current phone is just a year old and I would consider that a waste. Thanks anyways!
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ugith21
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My current laptop cost me around £350 and I bought it 5 years ago. It's still working fine, but struggles to even load up Chrome and Word. I've continued to use it for the first year of my course and struggled a lot. I would require more power for my future courses, that's why I'm prepared to spend a bit more. I'm not sure why you keep talking about wasting money. I've asked for reccomendations on laptops, not money management.
(Original post by CollegeStudent99)
So, has the OP decided what laptop they are going to get?
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ugith21
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Thank you for your reply!

I understand my weight estimation is quite unrealistic. I would not mind a laptop weighing around 2 kg. After reading your reply, I've thought of going for the XPS 15, but I'm also going to wait a bit more to see if I can get a discount.

Last week a friend told me about the ThinkPad T-series and recommended the T480s, with 256GB SSD, i7-8thgen U, and 16 GB RAM. I thought of going for this one too, as I really like the ThinkPads, and I've been told they last really long.




(Original post by Acsel)
Your weight requirement is a bit unreasonable, I think the X1 Carbon is the only device that even gets close. Most 13.3 inch ultrabooks struggle to hit that weight, with most ultra portable 15.6 inch devices coming in closer to 2Kg (which is still very lightweight all things considered).

Any of the laptops you've looked at are good choices, and really represent some of the very few options in the portable powerhouse department. In terms of a comparison between them:

The Thinkpad is noticeably more expensive for what you get. Starting at £1450 for just an 8250U, onboard graphics, a 256GB SSD and 8GB RAM it's substantially less powerful than the other devices. It is however much lighter, at only 1.1Kg, while also being a 14 inch laptop. IMO that price bump is not worth the slight decrease in weight and substantial decrease in power compared to the XPS 15 or Razer Blade. To get something comparatively powerful, you're looking at an X1 Extreme, which again is more expensive. It's unfortunate, as I really like the laptop but at this price it's tough to sell.

That leaves the Blade 15 and XPS 15. Unlike the Blade, the XPS is showing it's age a little and is still sporting a 1050Ti GPU. If you wanted to game, this may be an issue, but you want it for MechEng. You may or may not be able to take advantage of GPU acceleration, but either way the 1050Ti will more than suffice. The cheapest Blade is rocking a 1060 Max Q by comparison, so not a huge bump.

Looking purely at the entry level models:
The Blade costs £1480 whereas the XPS 15 is currently £1330 (ignoring the i5 model). You can get student discount on that, knocking it down to a mere £1200 which is an awfully good price.

The downside is that you only get 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage. However with the leftover budget you can easily upgrade that if needed later down the line; as far as I'm aware the XPS 15 still has upgradeable storage and RAM. The Blade on the other hand comes with a 128GB SSD and a 1TB HDD. The hard drive takes up battery space, so you'll get a smaller battery in this case.

Beyond that, most other specs are similar or don't matter. The weight is similar (dependent on whether you have a larger/small battery, HDD, etc.), both come with the same i7 8750H processor that absolutely trounces the 8250U in the Thinkpad and so on.

All in all, I'd go with the XPS 15. You can spend £1200 now and if you later decide that you need the extra storage and RAM that upgrade would only cost £100 to DIY, bringing the total up to £1300. Much better than the £1700 Dell are asking. It's a minor thing, but you can also go try an XPS 15 in a physical store to see if you like it. No such option with the Razer Blade.

So of the laptops listed (and TBH there aren't a whole lot of other options to begin with), the Thinkpad is unfortunately eliminated for being such a poor contender here. Between the Razer Blade and XPS 15, the win has to go to the XPS. It's cheaper (with or without the upgraded RAM and storage), and is otherwise on par with the Blade. The only place the Razer Blade beats it is the GPU and there's not a whole lot of difference between a 1050Ti and a 1060. Considering you don't want to game, and probably won't be making total use of GPU acceleration, the more budget XPS makes sense. I'm also not a fan of the Blades 128GB + 1TB option, since it eats into your battery capacity. With the XPS you have the option to just have a much bigger battery, alongside all round faster storage. All round it'd be tough to consider the Blade or Thinkpad over the XPS.

In terms of options besides those, we've already mentioned the Thinkpad X1 Extreme, which is again quite expensive. Custom machines would be an option, but these are typically heavier, not as nice to look at and probably not a whole lot different in price. The Asus Zenbook exists, but I'm not a huge fan of the design or the gimmicky touchpad screen. The Surface Book 2 is outside your budget and a MacBook would be silly. A pure gaming laptop may offer similar performance, but will skimp on the portability. So all round, I think you've already picked out the best options and I can't think of anything that can really compete with the XPS 15.

So the tl:dr is go for the XPS 15.
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Acsel
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(Original post by ugith21)
Thank you for your reply!

I understand my weight estimation is quite unrealistic. I would not mind a laptop weighing around 2 kg. After reading your reply, I've thought of going for the XPS 15, but I'm also going to wait a bit more to see if I can get a discount.

Last week a friend told me about the ThinkPad T-series and recommended the T480s, with 256GB SSD, i7-8thgen U, and 16 GB RAM. I thought of going for this one too, as I really like the ThinkPads, and I've been told they last really long.
ThinkPads have traditionally been strong devices and if you're willing to compromise on weight then the X1 Carbon is no longer your only option.

However that said, looking at other ThinkPads you're still paying more money than necessary. A T480S with a 512GB SSD (couldn't by default see a 256GB model), i7 8550U and 16GB RAM comes to £1539.99.

Comparing that to the XPS 15, you can get an i7 8750H (so not a low power processor), 8GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD for £1249. It also comes with a GPU, so no relying on integrated graphics. You'll get 10% student discount off that, so that brings the price down to around ~£1125. Unfortunately it comes with 2x4GB sticks of RAM, so you'd need to buy 2x8GB to get your desired 16GB. That'll set you back ~£75. A 512GB SSD upgrade adds another £70 or so. So although it would require a couple of upgrades yourself, you'd have an overall far more powerful laptop for around £1300.

So if you're waiting for the XPS to get discounted (it was £1330 in my original post, £1200 with student discount), nows the time to buy. It won't go any lower than £1250 as at that price it's directly competing with the XPS 13 as is.

The only reasons to consider the ThinkPad are size and weight. At 14 inches and 1.3Kg, it is smaller and lighter than an XPS. But paying £200-300 more and getting drastically inferior hardware (no GPU and an 8550U rather than 8750H) really isn't worth it. And if I'm being brutally honest, £1539.99 to only get a low power i7 and no GPU, when options with a full fat i7 and a dedicated GPU exist just stinks of a rip off. You're effectively paying for ultrabook grade hardware in a slightly larger body.
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Dunnig Kruger
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ugith21, your existing laptop can be given a new lease of life with £35 spent on an SSD and a fresh install of your operating system and applications.

You mate gets a thumbs up from me. A Lenovo T480 with 16 GB RAM for £650 (new from ebay) would be an OK solution. The lasting really long bit is how long the battery lasts before you need to recharge it (with the 9 cell battery option).
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ugith21
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That is true. The XPS is the best option. I wouldn't mind buying an lower RAM and storage laptop as long as it's upgradable later on down the line if I need more power. You've really being a great help. Cheers!
(Original post by Acsel)
ThinkPads have traditionally been strong devices and if you're willing to compromise on weight then the X1 Carbon is no longer your only option.

However that said, looking at other ThinkPads you're still paying more money than necessary. A T480S with a 512GB SSD (couldn't by default see a 256GB model), i7 8550U and 16GB RAM comes to £1539.99.

Comparing that to the XPS 15, you can get an i7 8750H (so not a low power processor), 8GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD for £1249. It also comes with a GPU, so no relying on integrated graphics. You'll get 10% student discount off that, so that brings the price down to around ~£1125. Unfortunately it comes with 2x4GB sticks of RAM, so you'd need to buy 2x8GB to get your desired 16GB. That'll set you back ~£75. A 512GB SSD upgrade adds another £70 or so. So although it would require a couple of upgrades yourself, you'd have an overall far more powerful laptop for around £1300.

So if you're waiting for the XPS to get discounted (it was £1330 in my original post, £1200 with student discount), nows the time to buy. It won't go any lower than £1250 as at that price it's directly competing with the XPS 13 as is.

The only reasons to consider the ThinkPad are size and weight. At 14 inches and 1.3Kg, it is smaller and lighter than an XPS. But paying £200-300 more and getting drastically inferior hardware (no GPU and an 8550U rather than 8750H) really isn't worth it. And if I'm being brutally honest, £1539.99 to only get a low power i7 and no GPU, when options with a full fat i7 and a dedicated GPU exist just stinks of a rip off. You're effectively paying for ultrabook grade hardware in a slightly larger body.
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ugith21
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Thank you! Even if I upgrade the storage on my current laptop, I would struggle to get it to uni as it weighs a lot and is quite clunky. That is one of the reasons I'm looking for a new one. Anyways, I really like the look of the ThinkPads, but as Acsel said the XPS is far better in terms of hardware. So I think I will go for the XPS.
(Original post by Dunnig Kruger)
ugith21, your existing laptop can be given a new lease of life with £35 spent on an SSD and a fresh install of your operating system and applications.

You mate gets a thumbs up from me. A Lenovo T480 with 16 GB RAM for £650 (new from ebay) would be an OK solution. The lasting really long bit is how long the battery lasts before you need to recharge it (with the 9 cell battery option).
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Acsel
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(Original post by ugith21)
That is true. The XPS is the best option. I wouldn't mind buying an lower RAM and storage laptop as long as it's upgradable later on down the line if I need more power. You've really being a great help. Cheers!
No worries happy to help. For around £1100 when you apply student discount you can't really go far wrong with the XPS. Upgrading the RAM won't be an issue, it's just 2 standard SODIMM and nothing soldered; bumping it up to 16GB or even 32GB wouldn't be an issue. Similar story with the SSD, it's a PCIe based M.2 SSD so another easy upgrade. That is about the limit of what you can upgrade and doesn't really add more power, just RAM and storage. But that's par for the course on laptops nowadays. To get a better upgrade path you'd have to buy a desktop. But all things considered, an 8750H is a plenty powerful chip, and if you're not gaming on it the 1050Ti will be sufficient for any graphically accelerated applications. Power wise you're sorted and the only things that may be an issue are the things you can upgrade anyway.

About the only issue you may run into is whether you own the right screwdriver. Presumably the XPS 15 uses the same Torx screws as the XPS 13, which isn't the sort of screwdriver bit you'll commonly find in your shed. So if you do upgrade, you might also be investing in a £5 screwdriver set, but I imagine a MechEng student won't have any trouble sourcing a screwdriver if necessary

Worth noting, if you did want to just go ahead and buy a model with 16GB of RAM and more storage straight away, but didn't want to pay Dell's exorbitant fee for the next model up, you could try contacting their customer services. They can be pretty helpful when they want to be, and may be able to hook you up with an upgraded model straight away. Custom builds are a thing, so it's certainly a possibility. Otherwise just go ahead and upgrade it yourself.

For peace of mind though, I would recommend nipping into a local Currys or John Lewis and seeing if they've got an XPS 15 models on display. It's always nice to get hands on with a device, especially when you're spending a fairly substantial amount of money on it.
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CollegeStudent99
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(Original post by ugith21)
Thanks for your reply. The thing is my current laptop has a Celeron processor and 4GB RAM, and I can't even open Solidworks after downloading. Plus it took a whole weekend to download. The configuration you've suggested wouldn't be sufficient as I'm looking for an upgrade rather than a downgrade. LOL. I've saved up for this so I wouldn't spend my money on a new phone or clothes, as my current phone is just a year old and I would consider that a waste. Thanks anyways!
No problem! I come from a "if it ain't broke don't fix it" type of household. We tend to hang on to things and keep using them until the day they break. Even then, if they break, my dad will usually insist on taking it to a shop to get it fixed before splashing out on a new one.

A lot of the technology in my house is very dated. Up until 2015, I was still using a Windows XP machine with a whopping 1GB of RAM, a cutting-edge single core AMD Sempron processor with a clock speed of 2.0 GHZ, and a 100GB hard drive. Needless to say, it was very slow a lot of the time...

I was also using, wait for it....

Spoiler:
Show
A 17 inch Dell CRT monitor (those old big bulky glass beige-coloured monitors) from 1999!<img src="https://static.thestudentroom.co.uk/5cd4194c39d0f/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.png" data-sceditor-emoticon="" alt="" title=""><img src="https://static.thestudentroom.co.uk/5cd4194c39d0f/forum/images/smilies/eek.png" data-sceditor-emoticon=":eek:" alt=":eek:" title=":eek:">



Even then, in 2015 I only upgraded to 4GB RAM, an Intel i5 4690 CPU and a 1TB hard drive which is very middle of the road by modern standards.

I also still use an iPhone 4S (a hand me down from my girlfriend after my Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini broke) and we STILL use a 1980's Decca TV set as our main TV! :eek:

I am shocked that a program wouldn't open on a machine with 4GB of RAM, I must admit, if I had other stuff running in the background on my 4GB RAM machine then some games would take ages to load/run really slow/not even get past the loading screen and I'd have to exit the game, close down the background programs and start the game again lol.

But I wouldn't expect a normal program to do that though - usually the operating system would just increase the size of the paging file (which essentially uses your hard drive as extra RAM) and the program would eventually load.

I just don't however see any point in spending more than you need - last year my college had PC's with Windows 7, i5 processors and 8GB RAM, then over the summer hols they upgraded them to Windows 10, i7 processors and 16GB RAM.

Guess how much speed improvement I noticed - absolutely none whatsoever because they were already running at lightning speed already - and most college students just use office and internet explorer (even IT Students) so it just seemed like a waste to me. The money would have been better spent elsewhere imo - perhaps free bus passes for every student, cheaper/better food in the refectory etc.

Anyway, enough rambling from me, good luck with the new machine. I hope it serves you well.
Last edited by CollegeStudent99; 4 weeks ago
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Dunnig Kruger
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"I just don't however see any point in spending more than you need - last year my college had PC's with Windows 7, i5 processors and 8GB RAM, then over the summer hols they upgraded them to Windows 10, i7 processors and 16GB RAM.

Guess how much speed improvement I noticed - absolutely none whatsoever because they were already running at lightning speed already - and most college students just use office and internet explorer (even IT Students) so it just seemed like a waste to me. The money would have been better spent elsewhere imo - perhaps free bus passes for every student, cheaper/better food in the refectory etc."


That is a hugely important point that you make there. I cannot stress highly enough how important it is.
What you've said in those 2 paragraphs should be stickied at the top of this section of the forum with shining flashing lights around it.
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Acsel
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(Original post by CollegeStudent99)
I am shocked that a program wouldn't open on a machine with 4GB of RAM
Honestly, this sort of thing isn't uncommon, paging can only get you so far. Taking a look at Solidworks hardware requirements, it actually wants a minimum of 16GB of RAM (and I can't imagine having a Celeron does the OP any favours either). I wouldn't consider Solidworks to be "normal software" but I've seen plenty of cases where software will just outright refuse to open if you don't meet the requirements. Or it opens and simply crashes.

In more extreme cases, you can see this sort of behaviour even in everyday Office software like Word and Excel. Open a large enough file without adequate system resources and you'll get a huge nope. I actually had to write my A Level Computing assignment in several documents, simply because although Word would open it wasn't a good experience. And that was on a laptop with 16GB of RAM and an i7 processor. That of course isn't normal usage for the majority of people, but in the case of Solidworks you'd certainly want to at least be hitting their 16GB minimum requirement if possible.

3D CAD software is a far cry from your average user's word docs, web browsing and streaming Netflix. You mention about not spending more than you need, and this is a really good example where the OP is going to notice substantial performance bumps as they spend more money. A £1000 laptop for writing emails is a luxury, a £1000 laptop for Solidworks is a tool for getting the job done.
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