OCR A level English Literature 2019 Watch

MissCarter786
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#41
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#41
im going to fail...
im struggling on the Shakespeare bit and paper 2...
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Deliciate
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#42
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(Original post by chem17)
I’m in a similar situation - I always find that the context pulls my marks down because while I know lots of context, I find integrating it very difficult - otherwise it’s just a sort of ‘bolt on’ in each paragraph and seems irrelevant... And I find both Hamlet questions hideous.

Any tips, anyone?
kinda just use the context to inform your point and strengthen your argument. You should always state your point first, use evidence from the text and then bend the context to make it relevant to your point. whilst doing this ensure you're making a sustained argument rather than just giving a history essay. the way you do this is by linking the context constantly to the play and to critics - ensuring AO1 forms the backbone of your essay.

try to be selective with the quotes you memorise. i always choose quotes that help me discuss context. if a quote can't help you discuss context then it's not useful for this essay. it's just like when you choose quotes for an essay where AO2 is dominant, you select quotes that allows you to engage in fruitful analysis.

context should inform your argument and support your point - it is a form of evidence. rather than placing it at the end of the paragraph, discuss it throughout the paragraph and discuss how this supports the writer's overall message. all the pieces of context you learn will have in some way impacted the writer - its up to you to suggest how this piece of context impacted the writer, why a specific quote shows that the writer was influenced by this context. your paragraph should basically never end with context, unless it's something very general like the patriarchal society or women. your final sentence should tie all your ideas together to help to create a coherent and sustained argument.
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chem17
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(Original post by Deliciate)
kinda just use the context to inform your point and strengthen your argument. You should always state your point first, use evidence from the text and then bend the context to make it relevant to your point. whilst doing this ensure you're making a sustained argument rather than just giving a history essay. the way you do this is by linking the context constantly to the play and to critics - ensuring AO1 forms the backbone of your essay.

try to be selective with the quotes you memorise. i always choose quotes that help me discuss context. if a quote can't help you discuss context then it's not useful for this essay. it's just like when you choose quotes for an essay where AO2 is dominant, you select quotes that allows you to engage in fruitful analysis.

context should inform your argument and support your point - it is a form of evidence. rather than placing it at the end of the paragraph, discuss it throughout the paragraph and discuss how this supports the writer's overall message. all the pieces of context you learn will have in some way impacted the writer - its up to you to suggest how this piece of context impacted the writer, why a specific quote shows that the writer was influenced by this context. your paragraph should basically never end with context, unless it's something very general like the patriarchal society or women. your final sentence should tie all your ideas together to help to create a coherent and sustained argument.
Thank you!! That is so helpful!
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Deliciate
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#44
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(Original post by chem17)
Thank you!! That is so helpful!
no problem
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chem17
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(Original post by Deliciate)
no problem
You don't have any advice about critics do you please?
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Wooord
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#46
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(Original post by Deliciate)
kinda just use the context to inform your point and strengthen your argument. You should always state your point first, use evidence from the text and then bend the context to make it relevant to your point. whilst doing this ensure you're making a sustained argument rather than just giving a history essay. the way you do this is by linking the context constantly to the play and to critics - ensuring AO1 forms the backbone of your essay.

try to be selective with the quotes you memorise. i always choose quotes that help me discuss context. if a quote can't help you discuss context then it's not useful for this essay. it's just like when you choose quotes for an essay where AO2 is dominant, you select quotes that allows you to engage in fruitful analysis.

context should inform your argument and support your point - it is a form of evidence. rather than placing it at the end of the paragraph, discuss it throughout the paragraph and discuss how this supports the writer's overall message. all the pieces of context you learn will have in some way impacted the writer - its up to you to suggest how this piece of context impacted the writer, why a specific quote shows that the writer was influenced by this context. your paragraph should basically never end with context, unless it's something very general like the patriarchal society or women. your final sentence should tie all your ideas together to help to create a coherent and sustained argument.
This is very helpful, thank you!
For your essays, do you argue both for and against? So if the question was for example, “(insert text here) is primarily concerned with taboo topics” and you decide your main argument running through the essay will be to agree with this, do you evaluate the other side of the argument? Hopefully this makes sense, my teacher doesn’t seem to want to answer this!
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Sasha Limbu
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#47
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(Original post by Wooord)
I submitted my coursework 2 weeks ago, and have no idea what its on! Hoping for a A. Good luck, I hope someone answers your question, that would be very useful. How have you been revising?
I have been revising by making mindmaps, flashcards and a table linking the A01+A03+A04+A05. I plan to re-read Richard III and The Merchant's Tales before my exam next thursday. Btw I found out my coursework is an A.😃 Thank you, good luck to you too!
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Deliciate
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(Original post by chem17)
You don't have any advice about critics do you please?
for critics in the comparative essay I would say definitely do not over complicate it as it's not as significant as the contextual AO. again, critics provide evidence to strengthen your point (whether you're disagreeing or agreeing with the critic). make sure when you include a critical quote you don't just insert it because it sounds good but you engage with it and develop it. Critical quotes provide a very succinct and nicely worded way to articulate what you might be trying to say, but obviously they don't answer the question - you must answer the question yourself through the critical quote. of course critics don't have to be quotes, they can be interpretations (feminist, marxist, psychoanalytical) or different perspectives (on the one hand you could argue x, on the other hand you could argue y) but they all serve the same purpose.
(Original post by Wooord)
This is very helpful, thank you!
For your essays, do you argue both for and against? So if the question was for example, “(insert text here) is primarily concerned with taboo topics” and you decide your main argument running through the essay will be to agree with this, do you evaluate the other side of the argument? Hopefully this makes sense, my teacher doesn’t seem to want to answer this!
as far as i am aware, whether you argue both for and against the question will not put you at an advantage or disadvantage. arguing against is useful because it means you're considering an alternative perspective, which is considered critical but it may cause you to lose your overall argument. it's important that you dont come to a balanced conclusion both agreeing and disagreeing at the same time because you'd be contradicting yourself - you should have a clear-cut view. in the example above you can't conclude that the primary concern is taboo topics but there are also other primary concerns such as x, y and z because they can't all be 'primary' concerns. instead you might conclude that taboo topics are not the 'primary' concern but another factor is - that way you somewhat agree with the statement. i tend to never completely disagree with the question unless it's completely wrong and inaccurate. if the question is one where it's hard to disagree with then definitely do not disagree for the sake of disagreeing.
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lucy.s.p
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#49
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so you seem like my English lit saviour but do you have any advice with revision as just writing essays is driving me crazy. do you have any other effective ways of revision? Thanks so much!
(Original post by Deliciate)
kinda just use the context to inform your point and strengthen your argument. You should always state your point first, use evidence from the text and then bend the context to make it relevant to your point. whilst doing this ensure you're making a sustained argument rather than just giving a history essay. the way you do this is by linking the context constantly to the play and to critics - ensuring AO1 forms the backbone of your essay.

try to be selective with the quotes you memorise. i always choose quotes that help me discuss context. if a quote can't help you discuss context then it's not useful for this essay. it's just like when you choose quotes for an essay where AO2 is dominant, you select quotes that allows you to engage in fruitful analysis.

context should inform your argument and support your point - it is a form of evidence. rather than placing it at the end of the paragraph, discuss it throughout the paragraph and discuss how this supports the writer's overall message. all the pieces of context you learn will have in some way impacted the writer - its up to you to suggest how this piece of context impacted the writer, why a specific quote shows that the writer was influenced by this context. your paragraph should basically never end with context, unless it's something very general like the patriarchal society or women. your final sentence should tie all your ideas together to help to create a coherent and sustained argument.
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Deliciate
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(Original post by lucy.s.p)
so you seem like my English lit saviour but do you have any advice with revision as just writing essays is driving me crazy. do you have any other effective ways of revision? Thanks so much!
ahhhh no i am definitely not, i am just trying to get through this like everyone else :lol:
i really like making tables on google docs for english to make sure i am covering all the assessment objectives. for the 1b critics essay in drama and poetry pre-1900, i have made a table for all the major themes and characters in the play with the different headings of: the interpretation, which audience would hold this interpretation, evidence from the text, critics and performances. for the comparative side of drama and poetry i made a document with all the different pieces of context linked to quotes, themes, critics etc. I think it's important to make documents like this to ensure youre hitting all the assessment objectives. however, I think at this stage doing something like this will take far too long so youre better off learning the notes you've made already, its up to u though.
this weekend i am gonna hopefully memorise all of this info and i have made flashcard sets on quizlet to learn critics and quotes from the play. next week, monday-thurs, i'm gonna make really short essay plans and basically recite them to myself. might sound sad but i really like talking through my essay plans, it helps it to stick and also means i'm kinda engaging with the question and i often come up with new ideas. writing whole essays is obviously useful to practice exam technique but it's very time consuming and tedious, i find essay plans more realistic as you're more likely to remember a short essay plan than a whole essay in the exam.
good luck xx
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Wooord
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#51
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Deliciate thank you, you are an incredible person I hope you have an amazing day
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MissCarter786
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#52
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#52
Does anyone know how to revise Shakespeare part A and B?
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lucy.s.p
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#53
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thank you so much this was so helpful!! xx
(Original post by Deliciate)
ahhhh no i am definitely not, i am just trying to get through this like everyone else :lol:
i really like making tables on google docs for english to make sure i am covering all the assessment objectives. for the 1b critics essay in drama and poetry pre-1900, i have made a table for all the major themes and characters in the play with the different headings of: the interpretation, which audience would hold this interpretation, evidence from the text, critics and performances. for the comparative side of drama and poetry i made a document with all the different pieces of context linked to quotes, themes, critics etc. I think it's important to make documents like this to ensure youre hitting all the assessment objectives. however, I think at this stage doing something like this will take far too long so youre better off learning the notes you've made already, its up to u though.
this weekend i am gonna hopefully memorise all of this info and i have made flashcard sets on quizlet to learn critics and quotes from the play. next week, monday-thurs, i'm gonna make really short essay plans and basically recite them to myself. might sound sad but i really like talking through my essay plans, it helps it to stick and also means i'm kinda engaging with the question and i often come up with new ideas. writing whole essays is obviously useful to practice exam technique but it's very time consuming and tedious, i find essay plans more realistic as you're more likely to remember a short essay plan than a whole essay in the exam.
good luck xx
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akmk
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Does anyone by any chance have any example essays or even just paragraphs that are good quality? No worries if not/you don't want to share, I totally get that! Just wondering as I feel like I don't even know what I'm aiming for
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starsonia2
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(Original post by MissCarter786)
Does anyone know how to revise Shakespeare part A and B?
For part A , I’ve been opening the text to any random passage and spending like 10mins making an essay plan of what I could analyze, and for B I’ve been making notes per character if we get a character q- like critics and quotes for it
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lucy.s.p
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does anyone have comparisons between the play duchess of Mali and the merchants tale? I know the obvious comparisons but I was just wondering if anyone had any more intricate or less obvious ones? thanks!
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greenteascratchy
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Does anyone know 1) how many critics we should include per para roughly for Shakespeare?

2) As someone asked above, I would super appreciate any model essays particularly on part 1a of Shakespeare.

3) Any help/tips on part 1a, especially any tips on what language analysis to look out for, roughly how many quotes from the passage to analyse per paragraph etc.

Good luck everyone!!
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greenteascratchy
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(Original post by lucy.s.p)
does anyone have comparisons between the play duchess of Mali and the merchants tale? I know the obvious comparisons but I was just wondering if anyone had any more intricate or less obvious ones? thanks!
Not sure which ones you already know of, but some 'niche' ones (at least to me!) would be to use Proserpina (very impressive because she's difficult) and comparing her to perhaps the Duchess/Julia on the role of women or disobedience. My teacher once gave us this model essay on how Proserpina can be compared to Bosola/Julia in terms of disobedience.

Using Julia is also impressive, using her to compare to May in particular, but more ambitious would be Damyan or Proserpina. The only issue is the lack of critical stuff so you have to be very clear on what you're writing. Proserpina is a 'tart feminist' (Tatlock I believe) and mention things on her myth, how Ceres her mother had to negotiate with Hades and therefore this is carried over by Proserpina's arguing skills. But also looking at whether she is portrayed as a strong female figure, because whilst she argues well and appears to be in control of her relationship with Pluto, she proves his point that women talk too much.

Antonio is another interesting one to look at in regards to social status, so comparing him to Damyan is a link.


Sorry, I'm so all over the place in my answer, but I hope it helps somehow? I don't know how many character links you have so I could be the most unhelpful person ever! If you have any ideas I would love to hear them as well
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lucy.s.p
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Hiya thanks so much they were so helpful you're amazing!! lifesaver, I love the analysis of prosperpina as defying stereotypes as well as conforming to them. I dont think I have many others but I guess another one you could try is how bosola is like placebo In some ways due to both of their sycophantic nature maybe cariola too? although I think maybe that one is a bit of a push. one I'm struggling to use is delio? and where to get him in? I guess in some ways he's like justinus as they're both good friends but I don't think delio necessarily advises against Antonio getting with the duchess which he probably should've done? sorry for rambling let me know if you have anything else this is really helping haha! x
(Original post by greenteascratchy)
Not sure which ones you already know of, but some 'niche' ones (at least to me!) would be to use Proserpina (very impressive because she's difficult) and comparing her to perhaps the Duchess/Julia on the role of women or disobedience. My teacher once gave us this model essay on how Proserpina can be compared to Bosola/Julia in terms of disobedience.

Using Julia is also impressive, using her to compare to May in particular, but more ambitious would be Damyan or Proserpina. The only issue is the lack of critical stuff so you have to be very clear on what you're writing. Proserpina is a 'tart feminist' (Tatlock I believe) and mention things on her myth, how Ceres her mother had to negotiate with Hades and therefore this is carried over by Proserpina's arguing skills. But also looking at whether she is portrayed as a strong female figure, because whilst she argues well and appears to be in control of her relationship with Pluto, she proves his point that women talk too much.

Antonio is another interesting one to look at in regards to social status, so comparing him to Damyan is a link.


Sorry, I'm so all over the place in my answer, but I hope it helps somehow? I don't know how many character links you have so I could be the most unhelpful person ever! If you have any ideas I would love to hear them as well
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MissCarter786
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#60
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The grade boundaries for 2018 were mad for OCR... they are ridiculous and they have put me down!!!!!!!! ARGH
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