Feel guilty for quitting my job as they've been so good to me Watch

claret_n_blue
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Hey all,

A few months ago I started applying for new jobs because I want more money. My current company won't pay me as much. The amount I can walk straight into at a new place, it'll take me around 3 years to try and get that here. Living in London, I need more money to live comfortably.

I've been applying and I'm quite far down the process however this last month has been insane. Since I have been doing well in my interview, weirdly I've been smashing it at my current job. Right now I'm in the position where I absolutely love my team and what I do. We work really hard, mainly because there isn't enough people, and also because we love what we do.

However if I accept the new job, I will feel like it'll be a huge kick in the teeth for a lot of people who have taught me so much, I have had so much fun with, and who have been able to enjoy their work more also now that I can take a bit of weight off their shoulders.

I know, bottom line when it comes to the CEO is that I'm just a number and they'll say "bye bye" if I try and act up, but I can't help feeling guilty that I'm betraying my team, and after all the love they've shown me, I'm throwing it back in their face.

Has anyone been in similar positions? What did you do? What should I do in this case? The salary is nearly an additional 8k a year, so it's a significant amount, plus a clear career path (unlike my current job)
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LoisLame
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Honestly don’t treat changing jobs as a betrayal. Treat it as the gift of an experience it was to work with them. Moving jobs is a natural part of life and they will totally understand. Enjoy the rest of the time you spend with your current team but don’t feel guilty about moving on to the next one. Keep moving forward and everything will be A-Okay 😎👌Besides an additional 8k is hard to turn down when you’re living in London! Hope this helped and I wish you the best with your career 💕
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chelseadagg3r
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That's quite the pay increase, congratulations! They won't be expecting you to stay forever, and they won't be expecting to stay forever either. I think they'll completely understand. Don't feel like you're betraying them - you aren't. It's a part of working life
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by claret_n_blue)
Hey all,

A few months ago I started applying for new jobs because I want more money. My current company won't pay me as much. The amount I can walk straight into at a new place, it'll take me around 3 years to try and get that here. Living in London, I need more money to live comfortably.

I've been applying and I'm quite far down the process however this last month has been insane. Since I have been doing well in my interview, weirdly I've been smashing it at my current job. Right now I'm in the position where I absolutely love my team and what I do. We work really hard, mainly because there isn't enough people, and also because we love what we do.

However if I accept the new job, I will feel like it'll be a huge kick in the teeth for a lot of people who have taught me so much, I have had so much fun with, and who have been able to enjoy their work more also now that I can take a bit of weight off their shoulders.

I know, bottom line when it comes to the CEO is that I'm just a number and they'll say "bye bye" if I try and act up, but I can't help feeling guilty that I'm betraying my team, and after all the love they've shown me, I'm throwing it back in their face.

Has anyone been in similar positions? What did you do? What should I do in this case? The salary is nearly an additional 8k a year, so it's a significant amount, plus a clear career path (unlike my current job)
You're not betraying anyone, nor are you throwing anything at anybody's face.

Take the new job, hand in your notice once you've passed the relevant post-offer stages (background check etc) and work the notice out, or take the holiday you're due.

Many congratulations
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harrysbar
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(Original post by claret_n_blue)
Hey all,

A few months ago I started applying for new jobs because I want more money. My current company won't pay me as much. The amount I can walk straight into at a new place, it'll take me around 3 years to try and get that here. Living in London, I need more money to live comfortably.

I've been applying and I'm quite far down the process however this last month has been insane. Since I have been doing well in my interview, weirdly I've been smashing it at my current job. Right now I'm in the position where I absolutely love my team and what I do. We work really hard, mainly because there isn't enough people, and also because we love what we do.

However if I accept the new job, I will feel like it'll be a huge kick in the teeth for a lot of people who have taught me so much, I have had so much fun with, and who have been able to enjoy their work more also now that I can take a bit of weight off their shoulders.

I know, bottom line when it comes to the CEO is that I'm just a number and they'll say "bye bye" if I try and act up, but I can't help feeling guilty that I'm betraying my team, and after all the love they've shown me, I'm throwing it back in their face.

Has anyone been in similar positions? What did you do? What should I do in this case? The salary is nearly an additional 8k a year, so it's a significant amount, plus a clear career path (unlike my current job)
I think it's common to feel a bit guilty about leaving a job when you like your colleagues and know that leaving the team will put them in a bit of an awkward position for a while. BUT we all need to do what is right for us, and it is perfectly clear in this situation that you need to take the higher paid job with the better career structure.

Occasionally, handing in your notice can prompt your current employer to offer you more money to stay and that would be more of a dilemma, in my opinion. But at the moment it is clear cut that you should leave and not allow your sensitivity to hold you back career wise. You're not betraying your team and most of them would probably also leave for an additional 8k, or else they have personal reasons for why the job suits their life. I work in a place where a lot of people left recently (for reasons I won't go into) - some of them felt guilty about leaving while we were in a bit of a mess but the organisation survives when individuals leave and everyone moves on.

Congratulations on the new job, don't let guilt hold you back from enjoying your achievement. I'm sure your colleagues will be genuinely pleased for you when you tell them the news.
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claret_n_blue
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Thanks a lot for all the advice guys, I really appreciate it

I think I just need to make sure that if my final stage goes well, I might give my work a heads up before I hand my official notice in.
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TaintedLight
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99% of the time Loyalty in the corporate world is overrated. They are really there to make money not be bffs. Bffs is just a by product if things go well.
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Y333EEE
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I wouldn't worry, it's just a part of life. They fully expect people to move on for more money, challenges or whatever reason. All your colleagues would do the same given half a chance
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barnetlad
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Leave with dignity, thank them, and by taking when giving your notice you are helping to leave with a good grace.
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winterscoming
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You're not betraying anybody; business isn't personal. When it comes to careers and employment, you need to look out for your own interests because nobody else will. Even the most helpful boss/employer/co-worker is ultimately looking out for their own interests too; it's just that in most good companies people look out for themselves by helping each other along the way and they gain as much benefit from your training/progression as you have in terms of your productivity at work and the quality of your work.

However, it still doesn't change the simple fact that the reason you have your current job is that your employer sees that the contribution you make to their business is of equal or greater value to them than the money they are paying you. Remember that if the tables were turned and your employer no longer felt you were needed, they wouldn't think twice before handing you your P45.

Also remember that absolutely everybody who works in a company is replaceable (even if not cheaply or easily) -- no exceptions there; even the people who everybody believes is irreplaceable (or people who believe themselves to be irreplaceable) turn out to be just as expendable as everybody else.

Furthermore, every business must always operate under the assumption that any one of its employees could leave at any time; or they could even be run over by a bus - the net effect to the employer is much the same; no well-managed company ever takes their employees for granted, and any work which needs doing can be reassigned to someone else (whoever replaces you, or maybe someone else who you work with already).

The money you're paid reflects how much your employer values the contribution you make to the business. If there are other employers willing to pay you more, then it means that you are undervalued in your current job. If your current employer felt it was really important for you to stay, or that the risk of you leaving outweighed the salary you're being paid, then your current salary would have already increased to reflect the fact that you'd be worth more to them.

When you write your letter of resignation, it's good to strike a positive chord, thanking them, let them know how much you've enjoyed it and appreciated the opportunities, yet being completely honest about the reason(s) why this move is good for you. You never know if some day in the future circumstances might change and perhaps you'll end up working with or for the same company again or the same people, so it's always good to leave behind a good impression.

Congratulations on the new job, hopefully it'll be a great opportunity to take the next step in your career, and with any luck you'll enjoy it just as much (or more), gain some valuable new skills/experience working in a different environment and with different people, all while being paid more at the same time.
Last edited by winterscoming; 9 months ago
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Y333EEE
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(Original post by winterscoming)
You're not betraying anybody; business isn't personal. When it comes to careers and employment, you need to look out for your own interests because nobody else will. Even the most helpful boss/employer/co-worker is ultimately looking out for their own interests too; it's just that in most good companies people look out for themselves by helping each other along the way and they gain as much benefit from your training/progression as you have in terms of your productivity at work and the quality of your work.

However, it still doesn't change the simple fact that the reason you have your current job is that your employer sees that the contribution you make to their business is of equal or greater value to them than the money they are paying you. Remember that if the tables were turned and your employer no longer felt you were needed, they wouldn't think twice before handing you your P45.

Also remember that absolutely everybody who works in a company is replaceable (even if not cheaply or easily) -- no exceptions there; even the people who everybody believes is irreplaceable (or people who believe themselves to be irreplaceable) turn out to be just as expendable as everybody else.

Furthermore, every business must always operate under the assumption that any one of its employees could leave at any time; or they could even be run over by a bus - the net effect to the employer is much the same; no well-managed company ever takes their employees for granted, and any work which needs doing can be reassigned to someone else (whoever replaces you, or maybe someone else who you work with already).

The money you're paid reflects how much your employer values the contribution you make to the business. If there are other employers willing to pay you more, then it means that you are undervalued in your current job. If your current employer felt it was really important for you to stay, or that the risk of you leaving outweighed the salary you're being paid, then your current salary would have already increased to reflect the fact that you'd be worth more to them.

When you write your letter of resignation, it's good to strike a positive chord, thanking them, let them know how much you've enjoyed it and appreciated the opportunities, yet being completely honest about the reason(s) why this move is good for you. You never know if some day in the future circumstances might change and perhaps you'll end up working with or for the same company again or the same people, so it's always good to leave behind a good impression.

Congratulations on the new job, hopefully it'll be a great opportunity to take the next step in your career, and with any luck you'll enjoy it just as much (or more), gain some valuable new skills/experience working in a different environment and with different people, all while being paid more at the same time.
Hit the nail on the head 👏👏👏
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scorpiorules
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Dont give them a headsup till you have been offered the job. You can then see if they will match the offer (including career prospects) but dont forget they were happy to keep paying you less than you are obviously worth.
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Y333EEE
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(Original post by scorpiorules)
Dont give them a headsup till you have been offered the job. You can then see if they will match the offer (including career prospects) but dont forget they were happy to keep paying you less than you are obviously worth.
I think they're probably going to have moved on now mate considering this was originally posted a month ago
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t.r.a.c.e
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It's normal to feel guilty, however this for your future and you will be getting paid an additional 8k, so I suggest you get that job.
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