john_iqbal786
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So I am deciding between mechatronics and electrical and electronic engineering currently. Currently the idea of working with robots seems appealing to me. However, on the electrical course I am looking at there are no optional units specialising in robotics or automation. Whereas, the mechatronics course good has mix of mech eng, electrical and computer eng and has units specialising in robotics. Quite a few of the units are the same on the electrical course except maybe 2 or 3 per year. While Im not a fan of the design and manufacture modules, the rest of the modules I like the sound of. What I am wondering is whether a degree in mechatronics and robotics would give me a narrower selection of jobs upon graduation than electrical eng as it more specialised. On the other hand would an electrical and electronic engineering degree give me enough knowledge to get a robotics job upon graduation
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Herts PG Student Repsdafaf
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(Original post by john_iqbal786)
So I am deciding between mechatronics and electrical and electronic engineering currently. Currently the idea of working with robots seems appealing to me. However, on the electrical course I am looking at there are no optional units specialising in robotics or automation. Whereas, the mechatronics course good has mix of mech eng, electrical and computer eng and has units specialising in robotics. Quite a few of the units are the same on the electrical course except maybe 2 or 3 per year. While Im not a fan of the design and manufacture modules, the rest of the modules I like the sound of. What I am wondering is whether a degree in mechatronics and robotics would give me a narrower selection of jobs upon graduation than electrical eng as it more specialised. On the other hand would an electrical and electronic engineering degree give me enough knowledge to get a robotics job upon graduation
Short answer - no, as robotics is probably going to see a lot of growth in the near future, so it's definitely not limiting.

Long answer - I think in terms of general opportunities, both degrees are more or less equal. A similar way of looking at it is comparing mechanical engineering with automotive engineering - while automotive engineering is more specialised, in industry there's no shortage of mechanical engineers jn automotive positions, or vice versa. I would imagine its much the same with the courses you mention (happy to be corrected however)!

Personally, I've found the more specialised course to be more exciting, as it relates directly to something I'm interested in (I'm an Automotive Engineering student). The design and manufacturing modules may seem like a chore, but in reality these are often the most important modules to give an appreciation of what engineering entails.

In short, I would say that if the more specialist course appeals to you, go for it. Normally the specialisation will come in the second or third year of study, so you will have the same grounding anyway.

Hope that helps!

Theo
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john_iqbal786
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(Original post by Herts PG Student Rep)
Short answer - no, as robotics is probably going to see a lot of growth in the near future, so it's definitely not limiting.

Long answer - I think in terms of general opportunities, both degrees are more or less equal. A similar way of looking at it is comparing mechanical engineering with automotive engineering - while automotive engineering is more specialised, in industry there's no shortage of mechanical engineers jn automotive positions, or vice versa. I would imagine its much the same with the courses you mention (happy to be corrected however)!

Personally, I've found the more specialised course to be more exciting, as it relates directly to something I'm interested in (I'm an Automotive Engineering student). The design and manufacturing modules may seem like a chore, but in reality these are often the most important modules to give an appreciation of what engineering entails.

In short, I would say that if the more specialist course appeals to you, go for it. Normally the specialisation will come in the second or third year of study, so you will have the same grounding anyway.

Hope that helps!

Theo
Thanks for your reply. I agree specialising in what I'm interested in would be better, however I was thinking to go for the more general route of electrical and electronic in case my interest gets shifted. Which is what I would have done if not for lack of optional modules into robotics, automation, AI etc. The software and electronics in automated robots is what has my interest and the mechanics of robots isn't bad either its just really the manufacturing processes which I don't fancy much (maybe it was just the university I was at but the module would put you to sleep). But, I guess you have to go through it to fully appreciate what you are creating.

Also, the reason why I thought mechatronics may be more limiting is because it is mixture of electrical and electronic, computer and mechanical engineering, which means your spread a bit thin in each area and if you were not to go for a robotics job then companies may choose an electrical or mechanical graduate as they would have more experience dealing with one of the two.
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Herts PG Student Repsdafaf
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(Original post by john_iqbal786)
Thanks for your reply. I agree specialising in what I'm interested in would be better, however I was thinking to go for the more general route of electrical and electronic in case my interest gets shifted. Which is what I would have done if not for lack of optional modules into robotics, automation, AI etc. The software and electronics in automated robots is what has my interest and the mechanics of robots isn't bad either its just really the manufacturing processes which I don't fancy much (maybe it was just the university I was at but the module would put you to sleep). But, I guess you have to go through it to fully appreciate what you are creating.

Also, the reason why I thought mechatronics may be more limiting is because it is mixture of electrical and electronic, computer and mechanical engineering, which means your spread a bit thin in each area and if you were not to go for a robotics job then companies may choose an electrical or mechanical graduate as they would have more experience dealing with one of the two.
I agree with the sentiment around manufacturing modules - I never found them particularly interesting myself, but they are definitely a necessary evil of sorts, especially in the design process.

In terms of being spread thin, it would depend to an extent on what the crossover is in the first year or two. I haven't seen too many cases where one course has gone into more depth than another - it is just the context that shifts. The more general courses have options to learn more stuff, but generally I think the engineering knowledge base is more or less the same across most of our engineering courses. The caveat is that I'm speaking from the perspective of mechanical and its specialisations, so I'm not sure what the spread is like on the electrical side.

It may be worth speaking to a tutor to see what they think, as they would likely have more knowledge - especially at your given institution.

Hope that helps

Theo
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