isiaiah d
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What are some fields chemical engineers can specialise in that are growing the most? I have a pretty general interest I would like to specialize more during my degree, I've heard things like nano/bio technology, but is there anything else?
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Student-95
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Renewables. Batteries. Environmental. Anything digital (digital twins, virtual plants, smart maintenance etc.)
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UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences
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Hi isiaih

I'm a third year chemical engineering student at the University of Birmingham. Chemical engineering is a great choice because of the wide range of fields you can go into! For instance I'm at a placement next year doing research and development for a coffee company, and I have friends doing everything from energy to pharmaceuticals to cars.
My best advice would be to get to university and then see what interests you most! Specialisation tends to happen towards the end of the degree, and your module choices are very unlikely to shut you off from any industry that appeals to you, so don't worry.
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GreenCub
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Some growing fields that chemical engineers work in include energy generation and storage (which is important as we are trying to shift from fossil fuel dependency to renewable/sustainable energy) and nanotechnology/biotechnology which is becoming more and more linked with chemical engineering.

Other fields include food/drink, pharmaceuticals, energy and oil/gas (it's a bit of a misconception that most chemical engineers go into oil and gas, as this isn't true at all).

Nearly all the products you commonly see in everyday life have been manufactured in some way using a process involving chemical engineers.
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artful_lounger
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Like the previous poster said, virtually everything you come across in your day to day life would've involved chemical engineers at some point. From plastics to paper to gels and pastes, pharmaceuticals to food, chemEs are involved in a lot more than oil and gas (or even just, energy engineering generally). I know of a chemE who did an internship with a toothpaste manufacturer

Water engineering/treatment, while perhaps traditionally more of a civE area, is also a field chemEs seem to be able to go into fairly readily, and is again, both important and likely to be growing at least slowly in the long term, and possibly faster depending how open you are to travelling and relocating. In energy, as above battery/energy storage is a major area of research and interest, and likely will see a lot of growth in the coming years. Renewable energy likewise, is not just politically topical, but a very active area of research both in academia and industry.
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