Biomedical science degree, HCPC registration, IBMS asessement - help me understand

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Ingrid16
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#1
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#1
Hi,
As a prefix I am not a UK national but I've lived here 4 years and intend to stay.
In July I'll be graduating from University of York with my integrated masters biomedical sciences degree. I've had a look at job offers going and it seems like unless I register with HCPC I can't really use my degree (unless I'm missing something, do let me know if so). I've had a look and to register I'd need to have my degree assessed by IBMS. Can I apply for this asessement before I graduate?
I'm so confused as I thought I'd just be able to go to work after graduating but this has completely discouraged me and I feel a litlle defeated.
Thank you in advance for any help and suggestions.
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jamiejay
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#2
You only need HCPC registration if you wish to work as a Biomedical Scientist in the NHS. 'Biomedical science' at university doesn't necessarily lead to this job role. There's a lot of discussion on these forums about this, and it seems to be a common problem.
RegisteredBMS should be able to expand more.
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Ingrid16
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#3
(Original post by jamiejay)
You only need HCPC registration if you wish to work as a Biomedical Scientist in the NHS. 'Biomedical science' at university doesn't necessarily lead to this job role. There's a lot of discussion on these forums about this, and it seems to be a common problem.
RegisteredBMS should be able to expand more.
I'm just so confused, I've read some of those threads as well. So what type of jobs can I do straight after my degree then? Lab assistant/technician? Because looking at biomedical scientist jobs they all require hcpc registration... Can I go and work in the industry (still lab based positions) without the hcpc registration then? I'm getting anxious just thinking about the possibility that I've just wasted 4 years of my life and in the end I'll stay at my part time cleaning job for the rest of my life (nothing wrong with that but I do enjoy growing bacteria and was hoping to make a living off it).
Thank you for your response anyway!
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jamiejay
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I'm not entirely sure, someone else might be able to answer that. All I know is getting a 'trainee biomedical scientist' job with your degree is really difficult, as a lot of people are in your position. Applying for lab assistant jobs is also the same, some will even decline you for being overqualified, because they will not support you to progress up to a biomedical scientist. I'm not gonna lie, you're in an awkward position.
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Kiraz
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I am starting with university of York and I didn't choose biomedical science because of accredited only by RBS. So you cant work in NHS and NHS is the only place you can be a biomedical scientist (as far as I know). So I am doing genetics instead but thinking of changing to molecular biology if need be as modules are exactly the same. I think same modules for biomedical science too. I thought of changing to biochemistry but I haven't done chemistry before. So I dont think I can do it. Maybe talk to career service and go from there as that's what I am thinking of doing before I decide of what best.
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Kiraz
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Did you do a year in industry then? I am planning of doing it but its 5 years study.
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artful_lounger
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#7
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You should be able to work in industry without HCPC registration, I believe; you just can't work in NHS roles called "biomedical scientist" (which I think is a protected title, so searching for "biomedical scientist jobs UK" would only come back with those kinds of roles if so). You may be better off looking for slightly more generically named positions like "lab manager", "research technician", "lab technician" and so on, if not just more widely at other grad schemes which may or may not be in scientific or para-scientific areas.

If you specifically want to work in a bioscientific lab environment, that isn't necessarily in the NHS (which would require the HCPC reg and IBMS accreditation) you should also start looking at PhDs, because that's what those kinds of environments need generally, postdocs and established researchers. Also look at university bioscience department job offerings, as often they'll hire grads to act as techs and those roles may involve more non-trivial work under a researcher, which might at least be decent paying work while you look for other positions or apply to PhDs.
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Ingrid16
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
You should be able to work in industry without HCPC registration, I believe; you just can't work in NHS roles called "biomedical scientist" (which I think is a protected title, so searching for "biomedical scientist jobs UK" would only come back with those kinds of roles if so). You may be better off looking for slightly more generically named positions like "lab manager", "research technician", "lab technician" and so on, if not just more widely at other grad schemes which may or may not be in scientific or para-scientific areas.

If you specifically want to work in a bioscientific lab environment, that isn't necessarily in the NHS (which would require the HCPC reg and IBMS accreditation) you should also start looking at PhDs, because that's what those kinds of environments need generally, postdocs and established researchers. Also look at university bioscience department job offerings, as often they'll hire grads to act as techs and those roles may involve more non-trivial work under a researcher, which might at least be decent paying work while you look for other positions or apply to PhDs.
Thank you so much for this!
Well, ideally I'd love to work in a microbiology lab environment, and as a start I dont care if it would be growing bacteria from human/animal samples or researching antimicrobial resistance, as long as it involves agar plates I'm happy. Obviously more challenging jobs would be ideal but I don't want to limit myself more than I already am.
I have been looking into PhDs but the competition is fierce and I'm kind of bound to the Northern England region for at least next 4 years. So not all hope is lost then!
Are there specific sites I should be looking at those kind of job adverts? Or are they generally advertised on the site of the employer?
Again thank you very much for your response!
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Ingrid16)
Thank you so much for this!
Well, ideally I'd love to work in a microbiology lab environment, and as a start I dont care if it would be growing bacteria from human/animal samples or researching antimicrobial resistance, as long as it involves agar plates I'm happy. Obviously more challenging jobs would be ideal but I don't want to limit myself more than I already am.
I have been looking into PhDs but the competition is fierce and I'm kind of bound to the Northern England region for at least next 4 years. So not all hope is lost then!
Are there specific sites I should be looking at those kind of job adverts? Or are they generally advertised on the site of the employer?
Again thank you very much for your response!
I don't know really, aggregate sites like monster and reed will probably have some, grad schemes are likely more well advertised on the employer's sites directly. Likewise roles based in universities are probably best to check their sites directly first. I doubt you'll be doing much first hand research without getting a PhD first, more likely you'll be setting up things for someone else's research.

For microbiology stuff look at also food industry and water treatment stuff too, and look for stuff like "microbiology lab technician" or "microbiologist" maybe (the latter is probably more targeted at PhDs though). Those sectors, along with biotech firms, probably will have more opportunities than anything with the term "medical" in it at your level I think.
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Ingrid16
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I don't know really, aggregate sites like monster and reed will probably have some, grad schemes are likely more well advertised on the employer's sites directly. Likewise roles based in universities are probably best to check their sites directly first. I doubt you'll be doing much first hand research without getting a PhD first, more likely you'll be setting up things for someone else's research.

For microbiology stuff look at also food industry and water treatment stuff too, and look for stuff like "microbiology lab technician" or "microbiologist" maybe (the latter is probably more targeted at PhDs though). Those sectors, along with biotech firms, probably will have more opportunities than anything with the term "medical" in it at your level I think.
This makes a lot of sense, thank you
I know that for first-hand research I'll need a PhD which I'm looking into but want a backup plan to do something between finding a PhD and graduating.
Thank you for your advice, you've been very helpful!
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Ingrid16
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(Original post by Kiraz)
Did you do a year in industry then? I am planning of doing it but its 5 years study.
Sorry just seen this, no I tried but couldn't get my CV down properly so was only offered one interview towards the end of the placement search and I was not successful.
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Kiraz
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(Original post by Ingrid16)
Sorry just seen this, no I tried but couldn't get my CV down properly so was only offered one interview towards the end of the placement search and I was not successful.
That's my worry that I wont get placement either. I might apply to NHS scientist training program incase I wont be able to get a job in the end. You could try that too but I heard it's very competitive. Was there any mature students studying with you by the way? I am mature student and worry that I will be alienated. I am looking forward to starting though
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RegisteredBMS
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So in order to be a 'Biomedical Scientist' you need HCPC registration. You've gone partially down the wrong route so the only option now is a Trainee Biomedical Scientist job, of which you would need NHS experience so you'd need to find an entry level job first, a Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant.

In regards to outside the NHS, there are a few private laboratories but they all require Biomedical Scientists (i.e, they require HCPC registration) since it is a requirement of their UKAS accreditation.

You will not find work equivalent to what a Biomedical Scientist does within a clinical setting. Your only bets are within industry such as food etc. If it's a clinical setting you want, laboratory diagnosis etc then your next step is a Band 2 MLA and to then seek a Trainee BMS role.
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Ingrid16
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(Original post by Kiraz)
That's my worry that I wont get placement either. I might apply to NHS scientist training program incase I wont be able to get a job in the end. You could try that too but I heard it's very competitive. Was there any mature students studying with you by the way? I am mature student and worry that I will be alienated. I am looking forward to starting though
I applied to the STP but fell short, too competitive especially the microbiology specialism. There was one mature student in biology I think, had a few lectures with her, and similarly one in biochemistry. I don't think you should feel alienated
(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
So in order to be a 'Biomedical Scientist' you need HCPC registration. You've gone partially down the wrong route so the only option now is a Trainee Biomedical Scientist job, of which you would need NHS experience so you'd need to find an entry level job first, a Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant.

In regards to outside the NHS, there are a few private laboratories but they all require Biomedical Scientists (i.e, they require HCPC registration) since it is a requirement of their UKAS accreditation.

You will not find work equivalent to what a Biomedical Scientist does within a clinical setting. Your only bets are within industry such as food etc. If it's a clinical setting you want, laboratory diagnosis etc then your next step is a Band 2 MLA and to then seek a Trainee BMS role.
So technically I just made it more difficult for myself by not going for a IBMS accredited course, but I can still go through specific jobs to become a registered biomedical scientist in the end, correct? It will just take more time?
Thank you for the information
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Kiraz
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(Original post by Ingrid16)
So technically I just made it more difficult for myself by not going for a IBMS accredited course, but I can still go through specific jobs to become a registered biomedical scientist in the end, correct? It will just take more time?
Thank you for the information
Thank you for the reply. I chose UoY just because its Russel group uni without realising it wasnt ibms accredited. I thought as long accredited with a body it was ok to take. I did apply biomedical science at Teesside university too as it is ibms accredited but pulled out after getting unconditional at UoY lol. I hope it wasnt a mistake. We will see. Good luck to you in the future with your career.
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Ingrid16
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(Original post by Kiraz)
Thank you for the reply. I chose UoY just because its Russel group uni without realising it wasnt ibms accredited. I thought as long accredited with a body it was ok to take. I did apply biomedical science at Teesside university too as it is ibms accredited but pulled out after getting unconditional at UoY lol. I hope it wasnt a mistake. We will see. Good luck to you in the future with your career.
See I had to make the uni and programme choice pretty fast and in Poland you look at league tables to determine what uni is good so I just applied the same logic and thought oh look, a Russell group uni, good biology department in all tables, must be good right? Lol
Thanks and good luck to you too
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RegisteredBMS
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Sorry I didn't realise you had not done an IBMS accredited degree. You've made it a LOT harder and also more expensive. You're not eligible for a Trainee Biomedical Scientist role without an IBMS accredited degree.

Prior to obtaining a Trainee BMS role, you need the IBMS to assess the suitability of your degree. This costs £285 and is non-refundable regardless of the result. The result will be one of three:

1. Your degree is suitable and you will be therefore deemed as the equivalent as having an IBMS accredited degree. This is uncommon.
2. Your degree is far too unsuitable and a whole new degree is required. This is also uncommon.
3. Your degree is unsuitable but top-up modules are an option. Complete this modules and you will have IBMS accreditation. This is the most common option. Unfortunately it brings an additional cost since you will be enrolling to individual modules with a University whom will charge you as any University does for a course. This is usually several hundred pounds.

So to answer your question overall. It will take more time, yes, it will also take more money. If being a Biomedical Scientist is what you want, go for it. Make sure it is though.
(Original post by Ingrid16)
I applied to the STP but fell short, too competitive especially the microbiology specialism. There was one mature student in biology I think, had a few lectures with her, and similarly one in biochemistry. I don't think you should feel alienated

So technically I just made it more difficult for myself by not going for a IBMS accredited course, but I can still go through specific jobs to become a registered biomedical scientist in the end, correct? It will just take more time?
Thank you for the information
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Ingrid16
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#18
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
Sorry I didn't realise you had not done an IBMS accredited degree. You've made it a LOT harder and also more expensive. You're not eligible for a Trainee Biomedical Scientist role without an IBMS accredited degree.

Prior to obtaining a Trainee BMS role, you need the IBMS to assess the suitability of your degree. This costs £285 and is non-refundable regardless of the result. The result will be one of three:

1. Your degree is suitable and you will be therefore deemed as the equivalent as having an IBMS accredited degree. This is uncommon.
2. Your degree is far too unsuitable and a whole new degree is required. This is also uncommon.
3. Your degree is unsuitable but top-up modules are an option. Complete this modules and you will have IBMS accreditation. This is the most common option. Unfortunately it brings an additional cost since you will be enrolling to individual modules with a University whom will charge you as any University does for a course. This is usually several hundred pounds.

So to answer your question overall. It will take more time, yes, it will also take more money. If being a Biomedical Scientist is what you want, go for it. Make sure it is though.
Okay, so can I apply to get my degree assessed before graduation? Or not?
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RegisteredBMS
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#19
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I'm not sure on that, but if you contact the IBMS they'll be able to inform you. As long as you know for sure your exact modules you will be studying then they may be able to do it.

https://www.ibms.org/registration/de...-registration/
(Original post by Ingrid16)
Okay, so can I apply to get my degree assessed before graduation? Or not?
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