Struggling with my dyslexia & the idea of teaching. Watch

meaghan sharp
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So where I am at in this process: I have been offered a place for a schools direct program. Which is conditional on me obtaining my Professional Skills Test in English and math. I have passed my math and am retaking my English.

The main issues I am having is fear, I am severely dyslexic and I am very worried about the workload, specifically the paper work and organisational requirements.

Is there any one within this forum that is currently going through the school direct program with sever dyslexia? Do you have any regrets? Do you think its to difficult?

Any discussion would be helpful.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by meaghan sharp)
So where I am at in this process: I have been offered a place for a schools direct program. Which is conditional on me obtaining my Professional Skills Test in English and math. I have passed my math and am retaking my English.

The main issues I am having is fear, I am severely dyslexic and I am very worried about the workload, specifically the paper work and organisational requirements.

Is there any one within this forum that is currently going through the school direct program with sever dyslexia? Do you have any regrets? Do you think its to difficult?

Any discussion would be helpful.
I'm not a teacher, but I am dyslexic and dyspraxic and just wanted to say how much I admire you for deciding to go into teaching. have you gotten extra time sorted for your skills tests?
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meaghan sharp
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(Original post by claireestelle)
I'm not a teacher, but I am dyslexic and dyspraxic and just wanted to say how much I admire you for deciding to go into teaching. have you gotten extra time sorted for your skills tests?
Hi,
Thanks, yes I have got extra time for my QTS Professional skills test. 25% As well as getting a paper test for each. I have a diagnostic report that I had done while I was at Uni (UWE) for Graphic design so I was able to email them that along with a form I had to fill in.

I have one complaint, the people who are responsible for booking tests for the dyslexics for QTS/PST take a long time to get back to you. There are only two people in the whole country that deal with us, they have 10 working days to get back to you. Which means that it can take almost half a month for them to get back to you. I personally think that there should be more of a team of people who can book/ correspond with people like me who are trying to take the QTS/PST.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by meaghan sharp)
Hi,
Thanks, yes I have got extra time for my QTS Professional skills test. 25% As well as getting a paper test for each. I have a diagnostic report that I had done while I was at Uni (UWE) for Graphic design so I was able to email them that along with a form I had to fill in.

I have one complaint, the people who are responsible for booking tests for the dyslexics for QTS/PST take a long time to get back to you. There are only two people in the whole country that deal with us, they have 10 working days to get back to you. Which means that it can take almost half a month for them to get back to you. I personally think that there should be more of a team of people who can book/ correspond with people like me who are trying to take the QTS/PST.
Yes that sounds frustrating, glad you got it sorted though.
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BlinkyBill
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I'm not Dyslexic, but I was a teacher (and also used to teach kids with Dyslexia). Like claireestelle, I think it's incredibly cool what you're doing.

From a teaching perspective, the level of admin and organisation needed is high, I'm not going to lie. However, it's the systems you put in place for yourself to manage that which are what make it possible in my opinion. Every teacher needs those sorts of habits and processes to get through, and it'll be the same for you. I'm assuming, but I reckon you've probably got some pretty solid personal habits in place to manage your dyslexia already, so it'll be working out how you apply those to the teaching workload.

I wonder whether the Schools Direct programme will also be able to offer you some support on this front?

Best of luck with it all!
(Original post by meaghan sharp)
So where I am at in this process: I have been offered a place for a schools direct program. Which is conditional on me obtaining my Professional Skills Test in English and math. I have passed my math and am retaking my English.

The main issues I am having is fear, I am severely dyslexic and I am very worried about the workload, specifically the paper work and organisational requirements.

Is there any one within this forum that is currently going through the school direct program with sever dyslexia? Do you have any regrets? Do you think its to difficult?

Any discussion would be helpful.
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yzanne
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I have about 4 teachers that I know are dyslexic, all of whom are executive heads. I have dyscalculia which is sort of a maths version of Dyslexia, and I just wanted to say that I think it's very admirable of you to do what you do.
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meaghan sharp
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Not directly, I will have to apply for DSA and then fund any extra help through that. which is disappointing as I thought that I would be able to access the student support services of the uni that my schools direct placement is associated with.


(Original post by BlinkyBill)
I'm not Dyslexic, but I was a teacher (and also used to teach kids with Dyslexia). Like claireestelle, I think it's incredibly cool what you're doing.

From a teaching perspective, the level of admin and organisation needed is high, I'm not going to lie. However, it's the systems you put in place for yourself to manage that which are what make it possible in my opinion. Every teacher needs those sorts of habits and processes to get through, and it'll be the same for you. I'm assuming, but I reckon you've probably got some pretty solid personal habits in place to manage your dyslexia already, so it'll be working out how you apply those to the teaching workload.

I wonder whether the Schools Direct programme will also be able to offer you some support on this front?

Best of luck with it all!
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meaghan sharp
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(Original post by yzanne)
I have about 4 teachers that I know are dyslexic, all of whom are executive heads. I have dyscalculia which is sort of a maths version of Dyslexia, and I just wanted to say that I think it's very admirable of you to do what you do.
Not there yet, and also reconsidering if it is right for me. But I appreciate the sentiment.
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BlinkyBill
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Ahhh I see. I agree, that is a shame. I wonder if you could contact student support services at that uni, and just double check whether there would be any options there (or maybe you already have)?

Fully appreciate you're still considering, and hopefully someone with more direct experience on the Schools Direct program might pop in here to help. But good to hear from yzanne that there are examples of teachers with dyslexia who really flourish.

I hope your English exam goes well!
(Original post by meaghan sharp)
Not directly, I will have to apply for DSA and then fund any extra help through that. which is disappointing as I thought that I would be able to access the student support services of the uni that my schools direct placement is associated with.
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meaghan sharp
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Hi ,
Yes I did contact the uni separately and no dice. My parents tought me from a young age to advocate for my needs. So I have been trying to get all the support that I can set up fr when I start the course. there seams to be little help for the procedure before you actually start, or I have been googling the wrong words/ looking in the wrong places. But since I don't have any contemporaries to talk to about their experiences, with dyslexia in mind I feel quite isolated and unsure of my decision to go into teaching.

As for the other teachers mentioned by @yzanne it is nice to hear. It still would be great to hear directly from people who are doing the PGCE or Schools Direct Program or some one with QTS status who is Dyslexic.

(Original post by BlinkyBill)
Ahhh I see. I agree, that is a shame. I wonder if you could contact student support services at that uni, and just double check whether there would be any options there (or maybe you already have)?

Fully appreciate you're still considering, and hopefully someone with more direct experience on the Schools Direct program might pop in here to help. But good to hear from yzanne that there are examples of teachers with dyslexia who really flourish.

I hope your English exam goes well!
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harrysbar
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I work in a school with a maths teacher who is severely dyslexic. He is a real favourite of the pupils since he is so encouraging to them about their own obstacles to learning, and freely admits that he struggles with things like spelling and organisation. He talks about his own problems very cheerfully and no one judges him - I think the kids like him more for it and after all, everyone can relate to finding certain things difficult - especially in a maths lesson :unsure:
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meaghan sharp
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@harrysbar My main concern is not the interaction with children. I have had years of experience as a nanny to get used to talking to little ones about the challenges I face. With your colleague, how do you think they handle the "business" side of teaching i.e paperwork, lesson planing ect?
(Original post by harrysbar)
I work in a school with a maths teacher who is severely dyslexic. He is a real favourite of the pupils since he is so encouraging to them about their own obstacles to learning, and freely admits that he struggles with things like spelling and organisation. He talks about his own problems very cheerfully and no one judges him - I think the kids like him more for it and after all, everyone can relate to finding certain things difficult - especially in a maths lesson :unsure:
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harrysbar
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(Original post by meaghan sharp)
@harrysbar My main concern is not the interaction with children. I have had years of experience as a nanny to get used to talking to little ones about the challenges I face. With your colleague, how do you think they handle the "business" side of teaching i.e paperwork, lesson planing ect?
I hear that they get quite a bit of help from colleagues, but I guess they're lucky they work in a friendly department.
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BewareTomato
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(Original post by meaghan sharp)
So where I am at in this process: I have been offered a place for a schools direct program. Which is conditional on me obtaining my Professional Skills Test in English and math. I have passed my math and am retaking my English.

The main issues I am having is fear, I am severely dyslexic and I am very worried about the workload, specifically the paper work and organisational requirements.

Is there any one within this forum that is currently going through the school direct program with sever dyslexia? Do you have any regrets? Do you think its to difficult?

Any discussion would be helpful.
Hey

I’m dyslexic, dyspraxic (and dyscalulic). I’ve got a conditional
Place for a school’s direct... it’s quite scary. I hope I don’t make a fool of myself tbh and I’m able to cope with it all!

(I didn’t add to the discussion but im in a similar boat to you)
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Visual_Learner
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I don't have dyslexia but I am dyscalculic. I rarely inform others I'm innumerate, it rarely comes up in discussions unless I absolutely have to mention it.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Visual_Learner)
I don't have dyslexia but I am dyscalculic. I rarely inform others I'm innumerate, it rarely comes up in discussions unless I absolutely have to mention it.
Yes, but that's easier to hide in everyday life
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meaghan sharp
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Hello @BewareTomato its nice to meet you. How are you finding the whole process? Do you think you have good coping mechanisms in place for studying? Have you told them ( the teaching school) about your learning differences? Have you done your professional skills test?
(Original post by BewareTomato)
Hey

I’m dyslexic, dyspraxic (and dyscalulic). I’ve got a conditional
Place for a school’s direct... it’s quite scary. I hope I don’t make a fool of myself tbh and I’m able to cope with it all!

(I didn’t add to the discussion but im in a similar boat to you)
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meaghan sharp
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@Visual_Learner are you studying ITT or are you someone with QTS status?
(Original post by Visual_Learner)
I don't have dyslexia but I am dyscalculic. I rarely inform others I'm innumerate, it rarely comes up in discussions unless I absolutely have to mention it.
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BewareTomato
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(Original post by meaghan sharp)
Hello @BewareTomato its nice to meet you. How are you finding the whole process? Do you think you have good coping mechanisms in place for studying? Have you told them ( the teaching school) about your learning differences? Have you done your professional skills test?
Hi

I have told the school. They were accommodating for the testing. It was a gruelling day but they were very nice. They repeated the questions if I asked them and never rushed me.

I have passed my numeracy (idk how) but I’m finding the English considerably hard for some reason. I do have reasonable adjustments in place.

For studying it depends

- coursework I start it early as I need to understand the task. I have a team at uni who help me with this. I’m not sure if I’ll get this at the school so I’m a little worried.
Then I break it down into chunks (and words) to make sure I meet the word count. And I start to write it slowly.

- Exams: I just make sure I understand throughout. After lectures and seminar I go over the work and email the lecture if I don’t understand something. They’re nice and get back to me promptly.

Closer to exam time I go over my recordings and highlight the things that the lecture said are important and refresh the older topics.

It’s very time consuming but I have the support in place at uni currently so I find myself coping well.

My pgce place is SD so I’m not sure if I’ll get the same type of support .... it makes me a little nervous tbh
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fallen_acorns
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I've never gone through the uk teaching programs, but I have been a teacher abroad, and still work in education now, just not in teaching roles.. and I am pretty badly dyslexic. (As my posts on here could easily testify)

The answer to whether you can teach is: yes, just certain things will be a bit harder for you, and certain things will take you a bit longer. There is no reason at all you can't do it, you will just need to work a bit harder on the written components of the job then some of your colleagues. It's not a problem, all teachers are worse in some areas, for example I always had a much much easier time with classroom behaviour and discipline then some other teachers I knew.. it's just swings and roundabouts, some things about the job will be easy for you, some won't be.

Get good at dealing with students who want to correct your spelling though..
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