Malaysian clinic shut down because of paranormal activity Watch

Good bloke
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#21
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#21
It's a shocker. Fortunately, in the west we don't have any institutions or people seeking to use for their own gain the predisposition of the gullible to believe superstitious nonsense.

Well, except the major religions, homeopaths, astrologers, mediums and fortune tellers, practitioners of Chinese medicine, writers of horror stories, casinos and bookmakers, the Loch Ness tourist industry, of course.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Good bloke)
It's a shocker. Fortunately, in the west we don't have any institutions or people seeking to use for their own gain the predisposition of the gullible to believe superstitious nonsense.

Well, except the major religions, homeopaths, astrologers, mediums and fortune tellers, practitioners of Chinese medicine, writers of horror stories, casinos and bookmakers, the Loch Ness tourist industry, of course.
Homeopathy is so clearly a load of hocum and yet until fairly recently a state-supported service in the UK, a nation based on rational enlightenment. Against that background, one marvels that crystal waving isn't compulsory in public service.
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z-hog
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(Original post by HucktheForde)
For those who cant read, this is basically a letter signed by Public health and safety officer at the district level of Malaysia , stating that there is sighting of ghost in a clinic and hence has to be shut down, including someone who saw an old women with long hair and long nails touching a patient. :afraid::afraid::afraid::afraid:

Do you believe this?:
Yeah, why not? People believe all sorts of strange things these days, why shouldn't we believe that?
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Homeopathy is so clearly a load of hocum and yet until fairly recently a state-supported service in the UK,
True, but, in defence of the NHS, the cost may have been justified by its success through the placebo effect (which can even work when the patient knows the only effect is a placebo).
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Good bloke)
True, but, in defence of the NHS, the cost may have been justified by its success through the placebo effect (which can even work when the patient knows the only effect is a placebo).
Ah. So maybe psuedoscience has a role?

Most of the evidence points to the value of time and attention for patients given by 'alternative' practitioners. Many people get better when listened to properly and then given authoritative-sounding harmless treatment by someone they esteem. Good old fashioned witch doctoring.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Good bloke)
True, but, in defence of the NHS, the cost may have been justified by its success through the placebo effect (which can even work when the patient knows the only effect is a placebo).
A propos, it's homeopathy being used in veterinary medicine that I have a particular problem with.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Shush clown - daddy's busy with some grown ups now. Here, have a snack:
Attachment 815590Attachment 815592
And a brief pause and a slight smell of sulphur and then wallop, the ban hammer falls. Normal service resumes and TSR becomes once more the place of gentle badinage and civilised debate that it is so well known for.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
And a brief pause and a slight smell of sulphur and then wallop, the ban hammer falls. Normal service resumes and TSR becomes once more the place of gentle badinage and civilised debate that it is so well known for.
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Last edited by Reality Check; 2 weeks ago
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Reality Check)
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Ahhh, my club. Bring us a carafe of port.
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OnYaBike
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(Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
Well I can't think of any other plausible explanation for a sighting of an old woman with long hair and nails other than that she is a SPOOOOPY GHOOOOST :iiam:
Can you imagine sitting in a room and an old lady with long hair and nails appears out of thin air? I'd advocate for shutting down the clinic too lol
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by OnYaBike)
Can you imagine sitting in a room and an old lady with long hair and nails appears out of thin air? I'd advocate for shutting down the clinic too lol
This happens to me regularly on the Overground.
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MeyPingas
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Sounds like the clinic might need diversity training...
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OnYaBike
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
This happens to me regularly on the Overground.
Run 4 ur lyfe
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AJ126
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(Original post by Good bloke)
True, but, in defence of the NHS, the cost may have been justified by its success through the placebo effect (which can even work when the patient knows the only effect is a placebo).
I'd prefer the NHS to spend money on medicine that actually works tbh not just a placebo.You are essentially saying that the NHS was justified in spending millions on water.Thats all homeopathy is really.Water.The only reason why it wasn't banned was because a certain Royal advocated for it.The very same royal who also talks to his plants.
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stoyfan
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(Original post by AJ126)
I'd prefer the NHS to spend money on medicine that actually works tbh not just a placebo.You are essentially saying that the NHS was justified in spending millions on water.Thats all homeopathy is really.Water.The only reason why it wasn't banned was because a certain Royal advocated for it.The very same royal who also talks to his plants.
Spoiler:
Show
Just has to be Prince Charles.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by AJ126)
not just a placebo.
If you can spend £1 and get a result worth £1.01 that you would not have got by spending nothing then the £1 was a worthwhile price to pay for the improvement.
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AJ126
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(Original post by Good bloke)
If you can spend £1 and get a result worth £1.01 that you would not have got by spending nothing then the £1 was a worthwhile price to pay for the improvement.
No it's not.Because you can spend a pound and get back 2 pounds instead of just an extra penny.Instead of spending money on a placebo for an ailment you can spend it on a real medicine which actually cures the ailment and gives you a lot more for your money.The choice isn't between spending a pound and doing nothing.Are you actually defending the NHS spending money on water as a medicine?
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(Original post by AJ126)
.Instead of spending money on a placebo for an ailment you can spend it on a real medicine which actually cures the ailment
You fail to take account of the sad fact that an effective medicine or procedure is not available for all ailments in all circumstances.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Good bloke)
If you can spend £1 and get a result worth £1.01 that you would not have got by spending nothing then the £1 was a worthwhile price to pay for the improvement.
Or, in the case of Homeopathy, £1.00000000000000000001.
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AJ126
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(Original post by Good bloke)
You fail to take account of the sad fact that an effective medicine or procedure is not available for all ailments in all circumstances.
Then we should spend taxpayer money on finding cures for those ailments through research.Not on giving patients false hope that their incurable illness can be cured.
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