Who were the Franks? (Crusades) Watch

SuperHuman98
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I have an essay question on the Crusades specifically the 3rd Crusade.

Essay is about the impact of the Crusades on the Franks.

Now im guessing that Franks definitely meant French especially as the French were the majority of the crusaders in the First Crusade, and Franks also refers to Francia.

But if I am talking about the 3rd Crusade can I also talking about Richard Lionheart, and Barbarossa as Franks? Since if I am correct Franks could also be a term used by Arabs to describe Europeans living in Crusader/former Crusader states.

I have a feeling that its just a general term for Western Europeans but I don't wanna mess up this essay by misinterpreting it
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BlueIndigoViolet
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Understand the confusion, Franks and Latin were used to describe the European kingdoms during this period, so mostly likely all 3 crusader kingdoms + others, as opposed to just the French kingdoms...


The term Frank has been used by many of the Eastern Orthodox and Muslim neighbours of medieval Latin Christendom (and beyond, such as in Asia) as a general synonym for a European from Western and Central Europe, areas that followed the Latin rites of Christianity under the authority of the Pope in Rome.Another term with similar use was Latins.


Modern historians often refer to Christians following the Latin rites in the eastern Mediterranean as Franks or Latins, regardless of their country of origin, whereas they use the words Rhomaios and Rûmi ("Roman") for Orthodox Christians. On a number of Greek islands, Catholics are still referred to as Φράγκοι (Frangoi) or "Franks", for instance on Syros, where they are called Φραγκοσυριανός (Frangosyrianos).
Last edited by BlueIndigoViolet; 9 months ago
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
I have an essay question on the Crusades specifically the 3rd Crusade.

Essay is about the impact of the Crusades on the Franks.

Now im guessing that Franks definitely meant French especially as the French were the majority of the crusaders in the First Crusade, and Franks also refers to Francia.

But if I am talking about the 3rd Crusade can I also talking about Richard Lionheart, and Barbarossa as Franks? Since if I am correct Franks could also be a term used by Arabs to describe Europeans living in Crusader/former Crusader states.

I have a feeling that its just a general term for Western Europeans but I don't wanna mess up this essay by misinterpreting it
Richard I was a Frank by any standards, he spoke French, he lived mainly in Aquitaine and he would have considered himself a Frankish ruler.

The term 'Franks' meant pretty much anyone from Western Europe to non-Europeans in the Crusades for example.
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SuperHuman98
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(Original post by BlueIndigoViolet)
Understand the confusion, Franks and Latin were used to describe the European kingdoms during this period, so mostly likely all 3 crusader kingdoms + others, as opposed to just the French kingdoms...


The term Frank has been used by many of the Eastern Orthodox and Muslim neighbours of medieval Latin Christendom (and beyond, such as in Asia) as a general synonym for a European from Western and Central Europe, areas that followed the Latin rites of Christianity under the authority of the Pope in Rome.Another term with similar use was Latins.


Modern historians often refer to Christians following the Latin rites in the eastern Mediterranean as Franks or Latins, regardless of their country of origin, whereas they use the words Rhomaios and Rûmi ("Roman") for Orthodox Christians. On a number of Greek islands, Catholics are still referred to as Φράγκοι (Frangoi) or "Franks", for instance on Syros, where they are called Φραγκοσυριανός (Frangosyrianos).
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Richard I was a Frank by any standards, he spoke French, he lived mainly in Aquitaine and he would have considered himself a Frankish ruler.

The term 'Franks' meant pretty much anyone from Western Europe to non-Europeans in the Crusades for example.
Perfect thanks a lot, I understand it now
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NJA
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Enjoy their creative humour (with modern translation)
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