University won't consider my speech-related disability Watch

1Person
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#1
Okay, so I really couldn't imagine this would have happened until a few days ago. Basically, I have a speech-related impairment in the form of a stutter (a serious one) so I have some big difficulties in expressing myself in the oral form.

I have previously received an offer to study Physics at UCL when I was informed of the need to pass an English language test in order to gain admission. I promptly contacted the admission office at UCL in order to explain my situation and told them about my impairment. I explained to them that the English language test that I have taken (the PTE-A) has been evaluated by an algorithm instead of a human (as usual) and so that it wasn't possible to address my speech-related issues at the time of the examination. Therefore, I have kindly asked them to consider my test results even without meeting the exact requirement for the speaking part since I have a medical certificate which clearly states my condition and difficulties. Also, my scores everywhere else were already meeting their requirements and I also had a quite high score in the writing section. To my surprise, they told me they couldn't consider my extenuating circumstances, even before taking a look at the medical evidence. They just said that they trust the English examination boards to accommodate for this.

That sounded quite unfair to me, but I decided to move on and ask if they could just have waived the requirement instead as I am already studying at the University in the UK for the current (2018-2019) academic, also achieving quite good results, and because they themselves specify the following condition as successfully meeting the language requirements:
<<completed a minimum of twelve months academic education leading to an awarded qualification, in a country that UCL considers to be 'majority English speaking'>>
However, they then told me that I won't have studied long enough at the university to be considered under this condition. Isn't an academic year considered to be equivalent to "twelve months academic education" in the UK? If not, how long should I have studied at the university in order to meet this requirement? I mean, no one in the world studies for 12 consecutive months at a time... Also, if my English was already good enough a year ago to let me into my current course then maybe it is the same (or better) now as well.

In addition to that, I also have a good score in the English language part of the SAT, 700/800... (I am saying this as some other universities outside the UK also considered my score in this examination to properly satisfy the language requirement)

Also notice that, out of 15 universities I have applied to during the last two years (both in and outside the UK), they are the only one that won't accept my actual situation as fully meeting their English language requirements.

I really don't know what to do. I cannot just pretend I don't have my communicative issues, take the test and magically achieve a good mark in the speaking section. Given the total absence of any kind of support from UCL on this matter, I almost feel like I am being discriminated against because of my inabilities. Is there any way to make them reconsider my case? Any suggestion would be greatly appreciated!

TLDR: I have a speech-related disability. I am already studying in the UK, have good PTE results overall except for the speaking part (although I have supporting medical evidence for this) and also a good score in the English language section of the SAT. UCL won't consider any of this and are still asking me to pass an English language test and get a satisfactory score in the speaking section as well in order to gain admission. I need them to reconsider my case or I probably won't be able to transfer to them for the next academic year.
0
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 months ago
#2
(Original post by 1Person)
Okay, so I really couldn't imagine this would have happened until a few days ago. Basically, I have a speech-related impairment in the form of a stutter (a serious one) so I have some big difficulties in expressing myself in the oral form.
I would go somewhere else that understands your situation. UCL is not the only university - that attitude stinks as well.
0
reply
CoolCavy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 months ago
#3
BurstingBubbles
0
reply
1Person
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#4
(Original post by Muttley79)
I would go somewhere else that understands your situation. UCL is not the only university - that attitude stinks as well.
Yes, that would be ideal especially since I am still waiting for a few decisions from unis outside of the UK. In the UK I think UCL would still be my best shot, academically speaking. What do you mean by saying "that attitude stinks as well"? I am sorry but I didn't understand this last statement.
0
reply
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 months ago
#5
(Original post by 1Person)
Okay, so I really couldn't imagine this would have happened until a few days ago. Basically, I have a speech-related impairment in the form of a stutter (a serious one) so I have some big difficulties in expressing myself in the oral form.

I have previously received an offer to study Physics at UCL when I was informed of the need to pass an English language test in order to gain admission. I promptly contacted the admission office at UCL in order to explain my situation and told them about my impairment. I explained to them that the English language test that I have taken (the PTE-A) has been evaluated by an algorithm instead of a human (as usual) and so that it wasn't possible to address my speech-related issues at the time of the examination. Therefore, I have kindly asked them to consider my test results even without meeting the exact requirement for the speaking part since I have a medical certificate which clearly states my condition and difficulties. Also, my scores everywhere else were already meeting their requirements and I also had a quite high score in the writing section. To my surprise, they told me they couldn't consider my extenuating circumstances, even before taking a look at the medical evidence. They just said that they trust the English examination boards to accommodate for this.

That sounded quite unfair to me, but I decided to move on and ask if they could just have waived the requirement instead as I am already studying at the University in the UK for the current (2018-2019) academic, also achieving quite good results, and because they themselves specify the following condition as successfully meeting the language requirements:
<<completed a minimum of twelve months academic education leading to an awarded qualification, in a country that UCL considers to be 'majority English speaking'>>
However, they then told me that I won't have studied long enough at the university to be considered under this condition. Isn't an academic year considered to be equivalent to "twelve months academic education" in the UK? If not, how long should I have studied at the university in order to meet this requirement? I mean, no one in the world studies for 12 consecutive months at a time... Also, if my English was already good enough a year ago to let me into my current course then maybe it is the same (or better) now as well.

In addition to that, I also have a good score in the English language part of the SAT, 700/800... (I am saying this as some other universities outside the UK also considered my score in this examination to properly satisfy the language requirement)

Also notice that, out of 15 universities I have applied to during the last two years (both in and outside the UK), they are the only one that won't accept my actual situation as fully meeting their English language requirements.

I really don't know what to do. I cannot just pretend I don't have my communicative issues, take the test and magically achieve a good mark in the speaking section. Given the total absence of any kind of support from UCL on this matter, I almost feel like I am being discriminated against because of my inabilities. Is there any way to make them reconsider my case? Any suggestion would be greatly appreciated!

TLDR: I have a speech-related disability. I am already studying in the UK, have good PTE results overall except for the speaking part (although I have supporting medical evidence for this) and also a good score in the English language section of the SAT. UCL won't consider any of this and are still asking me to pass an English language test and get a satisfactory score in the speaking section as well in order to gain admission. I need them to reconsider my case or I probably won't be able to transfer to them for the next academic year.
It might be worth considering if this uni would be the best option for you given they seem reluctant to accommodate your needs. If you need any other support or adjustments while studying you might find yourself faced with similar issues.
If not then I suggest you make a case that it would be a "reasonable adjustment" given your disability to reconsider you OR try to sort out getting yourself assessed with your disability taken into account. Unfortunately I don't have enough knowledge to make any more specific suggestions.
1
reply
BurstingBubbles
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 months ago
#6
1Person

If you meet the criteria and they are turning you away only based on a stammer then they are discriminating and not following the Equality Act 2010. As people have said above, exam boards and unis should be able to provide reasonable adjustments. When I trained to be a speech therapist there was someone on my course with a stammer and they did just fine at being a speech therapist so there's no excuse not to 'allow' someone with a stammer onto any uni course. As people have said above, if UCL are discriminating against you then you probably wouldn't be happy there anyway. But I would report it if you think you're being discriminated against so they can try and improve themselves.

You need to be getting onto the exam board as well, they should not be marking you down at all for the way you say something but the content of what you say. They should be giving you a lot of extra time.

As a separate note, have you been seen by a speech therapist recently? A referal may be good if the stammer is bothering you at all. If it's not then of course no need for a referal. It's other people who should be giving you the time and actually listening. Good luck with it all
Last edited by BurstingBubbles; 5 months ago
3
reply
swanseajack1
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 months ago
#7
(Original post by 1Person)
Okay, so I really couldn't imagine this would have happened until a few days ago. Basically, I have a speech-related impairment in the form of a stutter (a serious one) so I have some big difficulties in expressing myself in the oral form.

I have previously received an offer to study Physics at UCL when I was informed of the need to pass an English language test in order to gain admission. I promptly contacted the admission office at UCL in order to explain my situation and told them about my impairment. I explained to them that the English language test that I have taken (the PTE-A) has been evaluated by an algorithm instead of a human (as usual) and so that it wasn't possible to address my speech-related issues at the time of the examination. Therefore, I have kindly asked them to consider my test results even without meeting the exact requirement for the speaking part since I have a medical certificate which clearly states my condition and difficulties. Also, my scores everywhere else were already meeting their requirements and I also had a quite high score in the writing section. To my surprise, they told me they couldn't consider my extenuating circumstances, even before taking a look at the medical evidence. They just said that they trust the English examination boards to accommodate for this.

That sounded quite unfair to me, but I decided to move on and ask if they could just have waived the requirement instead as I am already studying at the University in the UK for the current (2018-2019) academic, also achieving quite good results, and because they themselves specify the following condition as successfully meeting the language requirements:
<<completed a minimum of twelve months academic education leading to an awarded qualification, in a country that UCL considers to be 'majority English speaking'>>
However, they then told me that I won't have studied long enough at the university to be considered under this condition. Isn't an academic year considered to be equivalent to "twelve months academic education" in the UK? If not, how long should I have studied at the university in order to meet this requirement? I mean, no one in the world studies for 12 consecutive months at a time... Also, if my English was already good enough a year ago to let me into my current course then maybe it is the same (or better) now as well.

In addition to that, I also have a good score in the English language part of the SAT, 700/800... (I am saying this as some other universities outside the UK also considered my score in this examination to properly satisfy the language requirement)

Also notice that, out of 15 universities I have applied to during the last two years (both in and outside the UK), they are the only one that won't accept my actual situation as fully meeting their English language requirements.

I really don't know what to do. I cannot just pretend I don't have my communicative issues, take the test and magically achieve a good mark in the speaking section. Given the total absence of any kind of support from UCL on this matter, I almost feel like I am being discriminated against because of my inabilities. Is there any way to make them reconsider my case? Any suggestion would be greatly appreciated!

TLDR: I have a speech-related disability. I am already studying in the UK, have good PTE results overall except for the speaking part (although I have supporting medical evidence for this) and also a good score in the English language section of the SAT. UCL won't consider any of this and are still asking me to pass an English language test and get a satisfactory score in the speaking section as well in order to gain admission. I need them to reconsider my case or I probably won't be able to transfer to them for the next academic year.
As Muttley has said you would be best looking elsewhere. There is no appreciable academic difference between UCL and a number of universities. Maybe look at places like Durham, Warwick, Lancaster, Exeter and Bath. If you are looking at London try Kings and for other bigger cities try Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester or Leeds.

The other option is to contact the disability officer for UCL. They are required by Law to make reasonable adjustment for anyone with a disability. I assume their refusal is due to you coming from a non English speaking country and requiring IELTS or similar and you have done well in the written section but badly in the Oral due to disability.
1
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 months ago
#8
(Original post by 1Person)
Yes, that would be ideal especially since I am still waiting for a few decisions from unis outside of the UK. In the UK I think UCL would still be my best shot, academically speaking. What do you mean by saying "that attitude stinks as well"? I am sorry but I didn't understand this last statement.
What I meant is they aren't obeying the law and you may find that if you go there they won't be supportive. UCL is not the only good university for Physics.
1
reply
1Person
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#9
(Original post by Kindred)
It might be worth considering if this uni would be the best option for you given they seem reluctant to accommodate your needs. If you need any other support or adjustments while studying you might find yourself faced with similar issues.
If not then I suggest you make a case that it would be a "reasonable adjustment" given your disability to reconsider you OR try to sort out getting yourself assessed with your disability taken into account. Unfortunately I don't have enough knowledge to make any more specific suggestions.
I know, I have thought the same, especially considering the fact that I have also another sight-related disability (two is better than one I suppose...). I was wondering about the possibility of not getting enough support from them, once there, so I told them about my preoccupations. They responded by saying: <<We can assure you that UCL provides a wide range of support for students with a disability or medical condition but we can only offer this to current UCL students.>>
Do you think this is actually true? Shouldn't a university also be able to take into account offer-holder difficulties and support them as well? I mean, others did...

Anyway, how would I "make a case that it would be a "reasonable adjustment" given your disability to reconsider"? Who exactly should I contact at UCL for that?

(Original post by BurstingBubbles)
1Person

If you meet the criteria and they are turning you away only based on a stammer then they are discriminating and not following the Equality Act 2010. As people have said above, exam boards and unis should be able to provide reasonable adjustments. When I trained to be a speech therapist there was someone on my course with a stammer and they did just fine at being a speech therapist so there's no excuse not to 'allow' someone with a stammer onto any uni course. As people have said above, if UCL are discriminating against you then you probably wouldn't be happy there anyway. But I would report it if you think you're being discriminated against so they can try and improve themselves.

You need to be getting onto the exam board as well, they should not be marking you down at all for the way you say something but the content of what you say. They should be giving you a lot of extra time.

As a separate note, have you been seen by a speech therapist recently? A referal may be good if the stammer is bothering you at all. If it's not then of course no need for a referal. It's other people who should be giving you the time and actually listening. Good luck with it all
Well, they are turning me away because of a low score in the speaking section of an English language examination, despite my certified speech-related issues, mostly because they do care more about putting a tick in the right box for admission, rather than taking into account my personal situation and having a look at the relevant medical evidence. I don't know if that would be considered to be a discriminatory behavior or not, but I think that it might at least be a little bit unnecessary. After all, green tick or not, I am already studying at the university somewhere else and doing quite well so...

Unfortunately, it wouldn't be much possible for the PTE-A exam board (Pearson) to accommodate my difficulties as their evaluation is carried out by algorithms. Most likely, they would only allow me extra time but without giving the AI knowledge of my stutter it would be little difference when I will start to repeat words or interrupt sentences midway.
I suppose that the only thing that I might do at this point is trying out another test. Honestly, I would like to avoid doing this as I don't know other tests' format too well, thus I might need some time before being able to get a good score everywhere. Also, I already have some plans for this Summer, after the end of my examinations, so it would also be hard for me to find the time needed to prepare for and undertake another English language examination. Plus the fact that, having already studied a full academic year at the university in the UK, I should probably have given enough proof already of my English language abilities.

I used to attend a speech therapist in the past, but I have stopped once I wasn't able to make any progress after some time.
Thanks

(Original post by swanseajack1)
As Muttley has said you would be best looking elsewhere. There is no appreciable academic difference between UCL and a number of universities. Maybe look at places like Durham, Warwick, Lancaster, Exeter and Bath. If you are looking at London try Kings and for other bigger cities try Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester or Leeds.

The other option is to contact the disability officer for UCL. They are required by Law to make reasonable adjustment for anyone with a disability. I assume their refusal is due to you coming from a non English speaking country and requiring IELTS or similar and you have done well in the written section but badly in the Oral due to disability.
The two main reasons why I would prefer to study at UCL are:
1. It's in London, a city that I do like very much.
2. Even though there would probably be almost no difference in the quality of teaching and research, UCL would definitely be the institution with the 'best international outlook', out of all my current choices (though I am still waiting for a few unis outside of the UK). This is quite important to me as I might want to migrate somewhere else after graduation. Indeed, in some countries, the sole name of the university that you attended is of extreme importance.

Anyway, do you think I would actually be able to contact UCL's disability officer, despite not being a student there yet?
0
reply
swanseajack1
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 months ago
#10
you have nothing to lose by trying and saying you believe the university is discriminating against you because of your speech impediment. Maybe they will be able to liaise with your admissions tutor.
(Original post by 1Person)
I know, I have thought the same, especially considering the fact that I have also another sight-related disability (two is better than one I suppose...). I was wondering about the possibility of not getting enough support from them, once there, so I told them about my preoccupations. They responded by saying: <<We can assure you that UCL provides a wide range of support for students with a disability or medical condition but we can only offer this to current UCL students.>>
Do you think this is actually true? Shouldn't a university also be able to take into account offer-holder difficulties and support them as well? I mean, others did...

Anyway, how would I "make a case that it would be a "reasonable adjustment" given your disability to reconsider"? Who exactly should I contact at UCL for that?


Well, they are turning me away because of a low score in the speaking section of an English language examination, despite my certified speech-related issues, mostly because they do care more about putting a tick in the right box for admission, rather than taking into account my personal situation and having a look at the relevant medical evidence. I don't know if that would be considered to be a discriminatory behavior or not, but I think that it might at least be a little bit unnecessary. After all, green tick or not, I am already studying at the university somewhere else and doing quite well so...

Unfortunately, it wouldn't be much possible for the PTE-A exam board (Pearson) to accommodate my difficulties as their evaluation is carried out by algorithms. Most likely, they would only allow me extra time but without giving the AI knowledge of my stutter it would be little difference when I will start to repeat words or interrupt sentences midway.
I suppose that the only thing that I might do at this point is trying out another test. Honestly, I would like to avoid doing this as I don't know other tests' format too well, thus I might need some time before being able to get a good score everywhere. Also, I already have some plans for this Summer, after the end of my examinations, so it would also be hard for me to find the time needed to prepare for and undertake another English language examination. Plus the fact that, having already studied a full academic year at the university in the UK, I should probably have given enough proof already of my English language abilities.

I used to attend a speech therapist in the past, but I have stopped once I wasn't able to make any progress after some time.
Thanks


The two main reasons why I would prefer to study at UCL are:
1. It's in London, a city that I do like very much.
2. Even though there would probably be almost no difference in the quality of teaching and research, UCL would definitely be the institution with the 'best international outlook', out of all my current choices (though I am still waiting for a few unis outside of the UK). This is quite important to me as I might want to migrate somewhere else after graduation. Indeed, in some countries, the sole name of the university that you attended is of extreme importance.

Anyway, do you think I would actually be able to contact UCL's disability officer, despite not being a student there yet?
0
reply
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 months ago
#11
(Original post by 1Person)
The two main reasons why I would prefer to study at UCL are:
1. It's in London, a city that I do like very much.
2. Even though there would probably be almost no difference in the quality of teaching and research, UCL would definitely be the institution with the 'best international outlook', out of all my current choices (though I am still waiting for a few unis outside of the UK). This is quite important to me as I might want to migrate somewhere else after graduation. Indeed, in some countries, the sole name of the university that you attended is of extreme importance.

Anyway, do you think I would actually be able to contact UCL's disability officer, despite not being a student there yet?
Yeah they should be baring things in mind for prospective students too.
In the UK schools and universities legally have to make "reasonable adjustments" to support people with disabilities. The problem is that is quite subjective so it's hard to work out what is a reasonable adjustment. What I would try is talking to the student support office to get some advice and having a read through the unis policies to see if you can find anything. It may be that they don't have any obligation to reconsider because the assessments were done and they should have taken your issues into account. If they were done in another country though you could potentially make a case that there is not adequate support compared to in the UK and ask to be given a test by them to give you another chance.
0
reply
CarolinaVM
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 months ago
#12
Hi!

I did a postgraduate degree at UCL (in an unrelated field) and I was a student representative for both my degree and my faculty.

I find it shocking that they treated you that way (but I do recall them being annoying with English language proof with someone that had studied in the UK for her entire life).

To my knowledge (I was in touch with loads of students with disabilities), UCL is very supportive and accomodating of students in this regard. I do think it might be worth it to contact their disability officer, at least so they are aware of what people in Admissions are doing. 😒

As for English tests, I reckon IELTS could be a good one for you. The speaking test is with a real examiner and they do ask about disabilities upon registration - I believe that if you provide them with the evidence and register in advance they may well change the times set for the speaking component. Writing is the section that most people find particularly difficult in IELTS, but you clearly have strong writing skills - it's just a matter of learning what structure they expect. 😉
0
reply
swanseajack1
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 months ago
#13
Here is a list of UCL requirements do you meet any. Could you delay to prove the 12 month or sit GCSE English Language

English language requirements


If your first language is not English you must be able to provide recent evidence that your spoken and written command of the English language is adequate for the programmes for which you have applied

These requirements are different for each degree and can be found in the entry requirements section of each degree page.
Please see accepted English language qualifications for details of individual English language tests and the grade equivalencies for Standard, Good and Advanced levels at UCL.
Accepted English language qualifications
Evidence of English language proficiency
Evidence we require may take one of the following forms
completed a minimum of 12 months' education in a country that UCL considers to be 'majority English speaking', no more than the summer two years prior to the proposed date of enrolment;
completed a minimum of 18 months of work experience in a country that UCL considers to be 'majority English speaking', no more than two years prior to the proposed date of enrolment;
completed a school leaving qualification containing English, which UCL considers to meet the CEFR B2 level in all 4 skills, no more than the summer 2 years prior to the proposed date of enrolment;obtained one of the English language tests accepted by UCL, no more than 2 years prior to the proposed date of enrolment.
A number of qualifications and tests are recognised, UCL's preferred English language qualification being the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The qualification or test result must have been awarded at the appropriate level (standard, good or advanced).We reserve the right, in individual circumstances, to specify an additional language requirement for an applicant if it is felt to be necessary, or to require a higher level than that indicated in the programme information below.
UCL Centre for Languages & International Education (CLIE)The UCL Centre for Languages & International Education offers a range of approved English language courses.
UCL Centre for Languages & International Education (CLIE)
(Original post by 1Person)
I know, I have thought the same, especially considering the fact that I have also another sight-related disability (two is better than one I suppose...). I was wondering about the possibility of not getting enough support from them, once there, so I told them about my preoccupations. They responded by saying: <<We can assure you that UCL provides a wide range of support for students with a disability or medical condition but we can only offer this to current UCL students.>>
Do you think this is actually true? Shouldn't a university also be able to take into account offer-holder difficulties and support them as well? I mean, others did...

Anyway, how would I "make a case that it would be a "reasonable adjustment" given your disability to reconsider"? Who exactly should I contact at UCL for that?


Well, they are turning me away because of a low score in the speaking section of an English language examination, despite my certified speech-related issues, mostly because they do care more about putting a tick in the right box for admission, rather than taking into account my personal situation and having a look at the relevant medical evidence. I don't know if that would be considered to be a discriminatory behavior or not, but I think that it might at least be a little bit unnecessary. After all, green tick or not, I am already studying at the university somewhere else and doing quite well so...

Unfortunately, it wouldn't be much possible for the PTE-A exam board (Pearson) to accommodate my difficulties as their evaluation is carried out by algorithms. Most likely, they would only allow me extra time but without giving the AI knowledge of my stutter it would be little difference when I will start to repeat words or interrupt sentences midway.
I suppose that the only thing that I might do at this point is trying out another test. Honestly, I would like to avoid doing this as I don't know other tests' format too well, thus I might need some time before being able to get a good score everywhere. Also, I already have some plans for this Summer, after the end of my examinations, so it would also be hard for me to find the time needed to prepare for and undertake another English language examination. Plus the fact that, having already studied a full academic year at the university in the UK, I should probably have given enough proof already of my English language abilities.

I used to attend a speech therapist in the past, but I have stopped once I wasn't able to make any progress after some time.
Thanks


The two main reasons why I would prefer to study at UCL are:
1. It's in London, a city that I do like very much.
2. Even though there would probably be almost no difference in the quality of teaching and research, UCL would definitely be the institution with the 'best international outlook', out of all my current choices (though I am still waiting for a few unis outside of the UK). This is quite important to me as I might want to migrate somewhere else after graduation. Indeed, in some countries, the sole name of the university that you attended is of extreme importance.

Anyway, do you think I would actually be able to contact UCL's disability officer, despite not being a student there yet?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19
  • Coventry University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19
  • University of Birmingham
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19

Why wouldn't you turn to teachers if you were being bullied?

They might tell my parents (11)
6.01%
They might tell the bully (18)
9.84%
I don't think they'd understand (32)
17.49%
It might lead to more bullying (70)
38.25%
There's nothing they could do (52)
28.42%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed