zafreenfarooque
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Dear all,

I'm interested to hear what people regard as the main difference between the two in practical terms.

I have been reading a lot of horror stories about the PGCE...which doesn't really instil confidence in me as I'm returning to study after another career.

Is the NQT easier or are they basically the same thing apart from PGCE meaning you can teach anywhere?
0
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by zafreenfarooque)
Dear all,

I'm interested to hear what people regard as the main difference between the two in practical terms.

I have been reading a lot of horror stories about the PGCE...which doesn't really instil confidence in me as I'm returning to study after another career.

Is the NQT easier or are they basically the same thing apart from PGCE meaning you can teach anywhere?
What 'horror stories' have you heard about the PGCE? I think maybe if you got some straight facts about it, you could maybe make a more informed choice.

I think you're getting mixed up with your terms. An NQT is one in their first year after gaining QTS.
0
reply
zafreenfarooque
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Reality Check)
What 'horror stories' have you heard about the PGCE? I think maybe if you got some straight facts about it, you could maybe make a more informed choice.

I think you're getting mixed up with your terms. An NQT is one in their first year after gaining QTS.
Thanks for the reply- sorry I mean't QTS!
I am interested in people's personal experience in this matter
0
reply
mgi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by zafreenfarooque)
Dear all,

I'm interested to hear what people regard as the main difference between the two in practical terms.

I have been reading a lot of horror stories about the PGCE...which doesn't really instil confidence in me as I'm returning to study after another career.

Is the NQT easier or are they basically the same thing apart from PGCE meaning you can teach anywhere?
(Original post by zafreenfarooque)
Thanks for the reply- sorry I mean't QTS!
I am interested in people's personal experience in this matter
the PGCE is demanding but so is the first year of teaching as a NQT! the PGCE is the practical and theoretical training prior to qualification. The practical training is done on a very reduced teaching timetable and you have to plan each lesson in a very detailed and frankly unrealistic way. Reality really kicks in when you get a full teaching timetable . Hours spent planning one lesson just does not work. A work life balance is something that you have to get right from the beginning. If not then you will suffer from burn out like many teachers. I think the teacher shortages give you a clue as to how unpopular teaching has become; it is far too stressful as a job and the pay is poor.
1
reply
zafreenfarooque
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
Thanks for your reply
(Original post by mgi)
the PGCE is demanding but so is the first year of teaching as a NQT! the PGCE is the practical and theoretical training prior to qualification. The practical training is done on a very reduced teaching timetable and you have to plan each lesson in a very detailed and frankly unrealistic way. Reality really kicks in when you get a full teaching timetable . Hours spent planning one lesson just does not work. A work life balance is something that you have to get right from the beginning. If not then you will suffer from burn out like many teachers. I think the teacher shortages give you a clue as to how unpopular teaching has become; it is far too stressful as a job and the pay is poor.
0
reply
Ouristhefury
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
I interviewed for a PCGE and for School Direct unsalaried and in both interviews - the one on one part - the person interviewing did go through how much will be demanded of you, the expectations, and did even discuss work life balance, mental health and how you could handle all of that. They did not sell either course as a comfortable or pleasant experience and after talking to a few people, they agreed that it actually sounded like they were trying to put us off going into it but really, I think it is a case of trying to make sure you are fully fit and ready and know what to expect.

I have friends in the unsalaried and they are worn down. I know a few have not handled it well and have even given up a few hobbies and stuff they were a part of but in the PCGE, they told me to not give up any outside activities I have (however, they did say a part time job doing this is not realistic at all). I think both are pretty hard - I thought School Direct sounded very intense and I preferred the university route. It really depends how you learn but also how you manage. You just have to know it's not a walk in the park and pick the right thing for you then try to manage from there.

I already have pre-course tasks and an assignment for my course...
0
reply
mgi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Ouristhefury)
I interviewed for a PCGE and for School Direct unsalaried and in both interviews - the one on one part - the person interviewing did go through how much will be demanded of you, the expectations, and did even discuss work life balance, mental health and how you could handle all of that. They did not sell either course as a comfortable or pleasant experience and after talking to a few people, they agreed that it actually sounded like they were trying to put us off going into it but really, I think it is a case of trying to make sure you are fully fit and ready and know what to expect.

I have friends in the unsalaried and they are worn down. I know a few have not handled it well and have even given up a few hobbies and stuff they were a part of but in the PCGE, they told me to not give up any outside activities I have (however, they did say a part time job doing this is not realistic at all). I think both are pretty hard - I thought School Direct sounded very intense and I preferred the university route. It really depends how you learn but also how you manage. You just have to know it's not a walk in the park and pick the right thing for you then try to manage from there.

I already have pre-course tasks and an assignment for my course...
I wish you all the best with you teaching career. I don't envy you though! lol.
0
reply
mgi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
As i say to any prospective teacher who is willing to listen; the so called teaching "profession" is a nonsense. Believe me, many teachers, probably including your so called mentor, hate their jobs. It is unbelievably pressuring and stressful. There are many examples of bullying of staff in schools and the bureaucracy is insane! Your mentor is just a cowardly bully. She knows that you are training, didn't want to train you ,and knows from experience that you have no one in the school to complain to really because you are not qualified yet. Compassion for staff is completely missing in schools. Before i quit as a teacher i sued my headteacher for similar reasons to the ones you describe in your post. I was not prepared to put up with his workplace bullying. The school got rid of him and I left and found another school easily. Then i quit teaching. What a ridiculous job to have!
0
reply
zafreenfarooque
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#9
Yes it does seem that finding the right school and staff is essential
0
reply
mgi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by zafreenfarooque)
Yes it does seem that finding the right school and staff is essential
It is absolutely the most essential thing if you are to have any chance of surviving in teaching. You also need to pay just as much attention to your own well being as you do to any school leader or headteacher. And avoid taking any work home otherwise your school will take up all your free time outside of school as well. Not on!
1
reply
tom_tom_tom
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
I am a training mentor at a school. Reading the original post (in your quote, that’s been deleted) I want to put my opinion into the ring.

The poster that you quoted sounds like a nightmare trainee to mentor. It sounds like they do not accept feedback well and are aggrieved to implement people’s advice. It is mentoring this means you find your own way from advice. Yes, you will get conflicting advice all teachers have their own style it is up to the individual to decide what they use. As a mentor all I want to see is a student try something. They don’t like it, fine. It’s the willing to show they want to develop. Also, a key point schools are a massively moving picture as-well. While what the poster explains some unprofessional behaviour from their mentor people need to remember that most mentors don’t get paid any extra or have any extra release time. They have to fit it around what often lack of time they already have. Which sometimes does push a trainee to the back of the queue, be this right or not it is reality.

Reading the post I’m very much in the mindset that there is two sides to every story. Personality clashes are possibly and this may be a case of one. However, struggling with feedback at this point in time does not paint a good picture for teaching as a career and the maturity to deal with reflective practice.
(Original post by mgi)
As i say to any prospective teacher who is willing to listen; the so called teaching "profession" is a nonsense. Believe me, many teachers, probably including your so called mentor, hate their jobs. It is unbelievably pressuring and stressful. There are many examples of bullying of staff in schools and the bureaucracy is insane! Your mentor is just a cowardly bully. She knows that you are training, didn't want to train you ,and knows from experience that you have no one in the school to complain to really because you are not qualified yet. Compassion for staff is completely missing in schools. Before i quit as a teacher i sued my headteacher for similar reasons to the ones you describe in your post. I was not prepared to put up with his workplace bullying. The school got rid of him and I left and found another school easily. Then i quit teaching. What a ridiculous job to have!
1
reply
mgi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by tom_tom_tom)
I am a training mentor at a school. Reading the original post (in your quote, that’s been deleted) I want to put my opinion into the ring.

The poster that you quoted sounds like a nightmare trainee to mentor. It sounds like they do not accept feedback well and are aggrieved to implement people’s advice. It is mentoring this means you find your own way from advice. Yes, you will get conflicting advice all teachers have their own style it is up to the individual to decide what they use. As a mentor all I want to see is a student try something. They don’t like it, fine. It’s the willing to show they want to develop. Also, a key point schools are a massively moving picture as-well. While what the poster explains some unprofessional behaviour from their mentor people need to remember that most mentors don’t get paid any extra or have any extra release time. They have to fit it around what often lack of time they already have. Which sometimes does push a trainee to the back of the queue, be this right or not it is reality.

Reading the post I’m very much in the mindset that there is two sides to every story. Personality clashes are possibly and this may be a case of one. However, struggling with feedback at this point in time does not paint a good picture for teaching as a career and the maturity to deal with reflective practice.
No. I think the trainee has received a very timely wake up call! The clues are in your response. Teaching is not a good career as evidenced by the fact that you have noted that trainees get pushed to the back of the queue sometimes. Such a poor advert for a so called profession! I hear that there is a recruitment crisis in that "profession "? I can't think why??! There isn't one in a true profession like law. I wonder why?
0
reply
ByEeek
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
Do a PGCE either at uni or through school direct / schitt. The horror is that whilst you are planning / marking / dealing with nightmare kids, you also have to write several essays. It isn't that bad.

NQT for me was harder than training. Others may disagree. After a bumpy start RQT has been a breeze by comparison.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (33)
17.55%
I'm not sure (5)
2.66%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (66)
35.11%
I have already dropped out (3)
1.6%
I'm not a current university student (81)
43.09%

Watched Threads

View All