confuseddddd
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Hi guys,
I really want to be a primary school teacher, but I am also really interested in Law. I am really confused on what I could do because by the end of this year I have to decide what course I want to do as I will be starting university from next September.
I was thinking about doing a Law Degree and then a teaching course to become a Primary School teacher, but I also want to be a Lawyer. Is it not possible for me to be a Lawyer as well as a Primary School Teacher?
If you have any other suggestions please tell me as they would be really helpful for me to make my decision.

I know that teachers are really underpaid, whereas lawyers earn a really good amount. However, the salary isn't what matters for me, I have a passion for both Law and Teaching.
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artful_lounger
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You could consider something in the realm of education policy research which might integrate both to an extent; the Education course at Cambridge might be of interest as they focus on this, in part (although it's not a teaching qualification). However that is neither being a teacher nor a lawyer, and there isn't really any way you would do both. You could become a secondary school teacher and teach law at A-level as well, although that isn't a primary teacher and obviously still isn't a lawyer.

The main thing to remember is you can become a lawyer (in the UK) with any degree background; in fact with the introduction of the SQE in a few years you wouldn't even necessarily need to do a "conversion" course (the GDL). Additionally students from non-law backgrounds can apply to training contracts with law firms which may also pay for the cost of a GDL as part of the contract.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by confuseddddd)
Hi guys,
I really want to be a primary school teacher, but I am also really interested in Law. I am really confused on what I could do because by the end of this year I have to decide what course I want to do as I will be starting university from next September.
I was thinking about doing a Law Degree and then a teaching course to become a Primary School teacher, but I also want to be a Lawyer. Is it not possible for me to be a Lawyer as well as a Primary School Teacher?
If you have any other suggestions please tell me as they would be really helpful for me to make my decision.

I know that teachers are really underpaid, whereas lawyers earn a really good amount. However, the salary isn't what matters for me, I have a passion for both Law and Teaching.
If you did a national curriculum subject at uni - one of the ones taught in every school like English, Maths, Science, History, Geography, RS, Languages, then you could specialise in 3 years time in either Law or teaching.

As you are so undecided, keeping your options open sounds sensible to me.
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mgi
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(Original post by confuseddddd)
Hi guys,
I really want to be a primary school teacher, but I am also really interested in Law. I am really confused on what I could do because by the end of this year I have to decide what course I want to do as I will be starting university from next September.
I was thinking about doing a Law Degree and then a teaching course to become a Primary School teacher, but I also want to be a Lawyer. Is it not possible for me to be a Lawyer as well as a Primary School Teacher?
If you have any other suggestions please tell me as they would be really helpful for me to make my decision.

I know that teachers are really underpaid, whereas lawyers earn a really good amount. However, the salary isn't what matters for me, I have a passion for both Law and Teaching.
Yes. But teaching is a very stressful job at the school level ,poorly paid and not worth it in my opinion. It depends on your goals- if you intend to be financially sound so that you can buy somewhere to live then law would be a better option. I don't think you can do both at the same time. For me, it is nit just about passion it is also about the practicalities of achieving financial goals as well. What is the point of being passionately broke or struggling financially if one can avoid it?
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Gradyh
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I understand that more quit teaching early on as opposed to newly qualified lawyers. The added pressure of ensuring the children are well behaved takes up your teaching time. Whereas a lawyer will have clients and a caseload to manage... you clearly adore children and want to help them, you could go into Education law of childcare law?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Gradyh)
I understand that more quit teaching early on as opposed to newly qualified lawyers. The added pressure of ensuring the children are well behaved takes up your teaching time. Whereas a lawyer will have clients and a caseload to manage... you clearly adore children and want to help them, you could go into Education law of childcare law?
Lots of Law students drop out of their degrees though because it is such a tough subject. And the ones who do graduate often struggle to get training contracts or find it impossible to do so because the market is oversaturated. And there is no such thing as a childcare lawyer
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mgi
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Am i the only one who thinks that there is rarely any point in doing a degree as a young person unless one has a carefully thought out present and future financial plan? Otherwise, you can graduate with a lot of debt, no job, poorly paid job, job unrelated to your 3-4 year degree course!?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by mgi)
Am i the only one who thinks that there is rarely any point in doing a degree as a young person unless one has a carefully thought out present and future financial plan? Otherwise, you can graduate with a lot of debt, no job, poorly paid job, job unrelated to your 3-4 year degree course!?
I agree someone shouldn't do a vocational course unless they have a carefully thought out plan for the future - hence why I suggested to OP 5 months ago (before this thread got bumped) that they do a national curriculum subject instead of Law or Education, in order to keep both those and lots of other careers options open
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missat
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(Original post by confuseddddd)
Hi guys,
I really want to be a primary school teacher, but I am also really interested in Law. I am really confused on what I could do because by the end of this year I have to decide what course I want to do as I will be starting university from next September.
I was thinking about doing a Law Degree and then a teaching course to become a Primary School teacher, but I also want to be a Lawyer. Is it not possible for me to be a Lawyer as well as a Primary School Teacher?
If you have any other suggestions please tell me as they would be really helpful for me to make my decision.

I know that teachers are really underpaid, whereas lawyers earn a really good amount. However, the salary isn't what matters for me, I have a passion for both Law and Teaching.
I have completed my LLB Law Degree (2:1) and recently completed the CILEx Graduate Fast-Track Diploma and have been applying for paralegal work, and seeking work experience for the past 18 months but I have been unsuccessful as it is extremely competitive (most employers request three years paralegal experience and completion of the LPC). I have always dreamed of having a career in Law and becoming a solicitor. However, I have decided to seek a career in Primary School Teaching and will apply to commence the PGCE in Primary Education for September 2020. I personally believe you should start your career in Law do a law degree, work hard to become a lawyer and if you still have a passion for Primary School Teaching, undertake the PGCE for one year to become a primary school teacher.
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confuseddddd
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(Original post by Gradyh)
I understand that more quit teaching early on as opposed to newly qualified lawyers. The added pressure of ensuring the children are well behaved takes up your teaching time. Whereas a lawyer will have clients and a caseload to manage... you clearly adore children and want to help them, you could go into Education law of childcare law?
(Original post by harrysbar)
I agree someone shouldn't do a vocational course unless they have a carefully thought out plan for the future - hence why I suggested to OP 5 months ago (before this thread got bumped) that they do a national curriculum subject instead of Law or Education, in order to keep both those and lots of other careers options open
(Original post by missat)
I have completed my LLB Law Degree (2:1) and recently completed the CILEx Graduate Fast-Track Diploma and have been applying for paralegal work, and seeking work experience for the past 18 months but I have been unsuccessful as it is extremely competitive (most employers request three years paralegal experience and completion of the LPC). I have always dreamed of having a career in Law and becoming a solicitor. However, I have decided to seek a career in Primary School Teaching and will apply to commence the PGCE in Primary Education for September 2020. I personally believe you should start your career in Law do a law degree, work hard to become a lawyer and if you still have a passion for Primary School Teaching, undertake the PGCE for one year to become a primary school teacher.
Thank you for all your advice. I will be doing Criminology and Sociology at University
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by confuseddddd)
Hi guys,
I really want to be a primary school teacher, but I am also really interested in Law. I am really confused on what I could do because by the end of this year I have to decide what course I want to do as I will be starting university from next September.
I was thinking about doing a Law Degree and then a teaching course to become a Primary School teacher, but I also want to be a Lawyer. Is it not possible for me to be a Lawyer as well as a Primary School Teacher?
If you have any other suggestions please tell me as they would be really helpful for me to make my decision.

I know that teachers are really underpaid, whereas lawyers earn a really good amount. However, the salary isn't what matters for me, I have a passion for both Law and Teaching.
You say that 'the salary isn't what matters for me'..... Let me assure you, when you have to pay your own way in the world, and that means paying for EVERYTHING~!! salary WILL matter for you. More than 80% of the REALLY serious arguments and disagreements between couples involve money and its management. If there is sufficient funding to live, those arguments become much less serious. A mate of mine has 3 daughters. The eldest decided that she wanted to be a school teacher. This is not surprising, because that is the first real 'profession' that most young people are exposed to. We tried to dissuade her, pointing out that elementary school teachers are paid dirt, and that child discipline was getting worse and worse. She, of course, would NOT be dissuaded. She finished her degree, and started teaching. Her BF was involved in the family businness - which was a 'plumbing supply' business - selling parts to plumbers. I was trying to get her dad involved in maintaining his own vehicles, and when the daughter [still living at home & a college student] at that point walked by, i would invite her to watch what we were doing.. She couldn't be bothered. "Oh, i'm going to get married, and my husband is going to take care of all that.

To make a long story short - the got married - and the ONLY!! thing her husband was interested in was plumbing. He wouldn't even fix his own car, much less hers. At times he was taking a bus or cab to work, because he couldn't afford to have his own car fixed in a garage. Forget hers!! She finally had to go take an 'adult education' course in auto repair. She told her mum: "Now do NOT tell Henry". Of course her mum told me straightaway. She still complains about how little teachers make. We point out - but Pamala... we TOLD you that!! Had she done an IT degree, she would be making 3 times as much. She also wouldn't have to put up with the disciplinary problems she faces every day. She's become involved in fights in the classroom - your basic rugby scrum, involving 8 or 10 students. Occasionally, knives or box cutters have been involved. This is NOT 'inner city' Chicago or NYC. It is upscale, northern Virginia, right outside D.C. - where the diplomats & embassy staff live. No faculty in her school have been stabbed yet - but i feel that that is only luck. Drugs are nearly everywhere, and various gangs have an established presence.

I have taught (as i have a masters degree), but only at the undergraduate and graduate Uni level. I would NEVER consider teaching below undergraduate uni. I do not wipe bottoms, blow noses, and generally do not assign homework. I usually run my classes like graduate school. I expect the students to be adults, and to do whatever they have to do to get the information into their heads. Every place i have ever taught, the students have been well behaved, and anxious to do well. This is a far cry from 6th form (high school) on my side of the pond, and i suspect yours.

A mate of mine's kid did an engineering degree (electrical), but then decided he didn't want to be an engineer - so he went back to uni and did a law degree. He said that he was the only lawyer with a 'hard science' degree at 4 out of 5 law firms that he's worked for. After 7 yrs of practice, he was making about $250,000 USD. Now, even i could live on that. Best of luck!!
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