UK turning into a Police state? Internet censorship Watch

Ninjashureken06
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#21
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#21
and there'll be roits in the street
(Original post by Ninjashureken06)
if VPNS get banned im leaving the country
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BlueIndigoViolet
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#22
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#22
Police state? Police too afraid to implement force and extra powers to stop this scourge of knife crime - imo powers like stop and search should be increased...


As for this regulation, the epitome of the nanny state, not thought through, policing content and parenting should be in the hands of parents not the government policing adult content...
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TheYearNiner
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#23
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Nothing good about porn anyway stop crying
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The_Internet
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#24
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They won't, and can't really ban VPNs... It'd mean every service provider would have to migrate to MPLS, and that's just insane given that MPLS/SDWAN is only really required for ease, and high speed video connectivity

Even the NHS uses VPNs over the N3 network. We use it to connect into our own office elsewhere! MPLS for an office with two people in it is just insane..

Government will try and act tough, saying they're going to ban VPNs or ban cryptography, but ultimately businesses will say "What the hell are you doing?" and the government will quietly backtrack whilst appeasing their older demographic.

It's also likely that ISPs will do the absolute bare minimum, and will do changes on the DNS security side of things, as required by law. Just like with piracy, that's super easy to get around...
Last edited by The_Internet; 2 months ago
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Acsel
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(Original post by The_Internet)
Even the NHS uses VPNs over the N3 network. We use it to connect into our own office elsewhere! MPLS for an office with two people in it is just insane..
It's like saying "we're going to ban P2P technology" just because a handful of people torrent movies illegally. The entire notion of banning VPNs or cryptography is just dumb.

The basic conclusion we came to in the other thread, it's a perfectly reasonable thing to do from a safeguarding perspective but the actual implementation is awful.
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The_Internet
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(Original post by Acsel)
It's like saying "we're going to ban P2P technology" just because a handful of people torrent movies illegally. The entire notion of banning VPNs or cryptography is just dumb.

The basic conclusion we came to in the other thread, it's a perfectly reasonable thing to do from a safeguarding perspective but the actual implementation is awful.
Kinda. They could say we're going ban what most people see as P2P downloads. It would be awful for Linux distributions however in the enterprise, I don't know anyone who'd download a distro via P2P

If the government doesn't understand what they want, and put into law that you can't have any P2P traffic whatsoever in the UK, then you can pretty much say bye bye to the economy, given that at ISPs you will have one IP at your side, and one IP at the customer's side ie: a peer to peer link. If they word it incorrectly, and it becomes law, we'd be pretty screwed...
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Greywolftwo
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(Original post by Jules89090)
First of all, any and all teenagers who want access to porn, will get it, via worse sites with highly illegal material, the deep web, or by using VPN's, so this solves nothing.

Secondly, sure, a lot of porn is destructive, which is why people should be educated about what a healthy sex life is. There are sex positive porn videos that don't warp peoples minds. Trying to block all porn won't help society, I can assure you that.

3rd, the UK government previously already banned all porn depicting female orgasms, but not male, so forgive me if I don't have confidence in their ability to remain objective when deciding what is good or not for general society.

4th, if they block this, why wouldn't they attempt to block other things they don't want the public viewing? All other governments (bar non) who have passed similar laws did exactly that.

You tell people not to watch this video but you've provided no sources for any counter points. Just your own conservative views.
Most teens don't know how to access the proper dark web, by downloading a TOR browser you are only at the entrance of the portal to the deep web
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Acsel
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(Original post by The_Internet)
Kinda. They could say we're going ban what most people see as P2P downloads. It would be awful for Linux distributions however in the enterprise, I don't know anyone who'd download a distro via P2P

If the government doesn't understand what they want, and put into law that you can't have any P2P traffic whatsoever in the UK, then you can pretty much say bye bye to the economy, given that at ISPs you will have one IP at your side, and one IP at the customer's side ie: a peer to peer link. If they word it incorrectly, and it becomes law, we'd be pretty screwed...
They fundamentally have. We already have laws regarding copyright breaches, it just simply worth enforcing them for individuals pirating content. It's the distributors who get targeted. But it's a similar reason why Tor and the Dark Web aren't "banned". The issue is not the platform but what it is being used for. In some respects, the government do understand that.

But it's never going to get to a stage where something stupid like "ban all P2P traffic" comes into effect, because people that know what they're talking about will raise the issue and it really isn't in government interest to break the Internet.
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Jules89090
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#29
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Russia, Turkey and China have banned VPN's. While they still exist, they are constantly getting broken, shut down and people caught using them get in real trouble, as in prison time, if the authorities feel like it. I'm completely ready to believe that the UK would break it's own country and take away people's civil liberties like that in the name of "national security" or some other BS.
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Acsel
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(Original post by Jules89090)
Russia, Turkey and China have banned VPN's. While they still exist, they are constantly getting broken, shut down and people caught using them get in real trouble, as in prison time, if the authorities feel like it. I'm completely ready to believe that the UK would break it's own country and take away people's civil liberties like that in the name of "national security" or some other BS.
The state of the Internet in Russia and China in particular is a far cry from what we have in the UK. Thinking that we would go in the same direction is absurd
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Greywolftwo
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#31
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I don't know where you get these extreme views from but that is definitely not true
(Original post by Jules89090)
Russia, Turkey and China have banned VPN's. While they still exist, they are constantly getting broken, shut down and people caught using them get in real trouble, as in prison time, if the authorities feel like it. I'm completely ready to believe that the UK would break it's own country and take away people's civil liberties like that in the name of "national security" or some other BS.
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Fullofsurprises
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#32
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(Original post by ThomH97)
I do believe it's intended to protect younger people. However, it clearly won't, and at the cost of a massive security and privacy risk.
This appears to be a typical government project of contemporary Britain.

(1) The media raise a problem, part of which is genuine and part overdone.
(2) The government promise a knee-jerk simplistic solution rather than analysing it properly and thinking it through.
(3) Legislation is rushed past compliant MPs scared by the public reaction to (1).
(4) A private corporation is then contracted to run the 'solution', badly and at great cost to the taxpayer.
(5) The contractor abuses or loses the private information of clients.
(6) After a few years of chaos the service is dropped.

Usually step (1) is inspired by the contractor mentioned in steps (4) and (5) via the adroit use of PR firms and tame journalists.
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the beer
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#33
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(Original post by The_Internet)
They won't, and can't really ban VPNs.
Couldn't they do something like introduce licenses and/or ban the use of any VPN that allows circumvention of UK law or doesn't provide them with government-mandated backdoors?
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Acsel
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#34
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(Original post by the beer)
Couldn't they do something like introduce licenses and/or ban the use of any VPN that allows circumvention of UK law or doesn't provide them with government-mandated backdoors?
Nobody would use a VPN with a backdoor in the first place. The government are also trying to increase our confidence in them, not destroy it. Adding a backdoor to a service built around privacy would do nothing to inspire confidence.

In terms of licenses and banning, they suffer many of the same issues as a "porn ban". Not only will people find a way around the restrictions, but you simply can't police the Internet in the same way you police people in real life. Try to ban VPNs? People will use P2P connections, or proxy servers, or any manner of other technology.

That's ignoring the logistics of actually banning a VPN to begin with. Traffic going over a VPN is in some ways identifiable, but it's not as simple as just blocking all the VPN traffic. Not to mention any VPN which connects you through another country would allow for circumvention of laws built around UK georestriction. That doesn't mean everyone using a VPN is using it to break a law. The whole notion of banning VPNs would only be there to prevent users accessing porn, not to stop legitimate users from using a VPN in the first place. Therefore to block the right traffic, you need to understand that traffic. Is it possible for someone to track an individual through a VPN? Absolutely. Is it possible to analyse all VPN traffic and selectively block the traffic you want, in real time? Across the entire country, from billions of citizens? Logistically no.
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username4454836
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(Original post by the beer)
Couldn't they do something like introduce licenses and/or ban the use of any VPN that allows circumvention of UK law or doesn't provide them with government-mandated backdoors?
If there is a backdoor for legitimate parties it is also a backdoor for illegitimate parties.
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the beer
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(Original post by Decahedron)
If there is a backdoor for legitimate parties it is also a backdoor for illegitimate parties.
Well yeah, not saying it's a good idea, just something i can imagine the government doing.
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KellyM90
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#37
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Oh really? The way Russia managed to get it's internet to the state it's currently in is by passing internet decency laws.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Pro...nd_Development

UK is in the process of doing. Not only with porn but you can now also get arrested for the things you say online here in the UK. Personally I think it's a good thing though. We don't need all that filth anymore. The internet shouldn't be so open anymore. It's dangerous.
(Original post by Acsel)
The state of the Internet in Russia and China in particular is a far cry from what we have in the UK. Thinking that we would go in the same direction is absurd
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KellyM90
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#38
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I do agree that the OP is an extreme liberal, but she seems to be on the mark in regards the UK gradually implementing internet censorship. Turkey and Russia didn't block the internet overnight. They did it in increments. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Pro...nd_Development
(Original post by Greywolftwo)
I don't know where you get these extreme views from but that is definitely not true
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username4454836
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(Original post by the beer)
Well yeah, not saying it's a good idea, just something i can imagine the government doing.
Even the isn't government that stupid.
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the beer
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(Original post by Decahedron)
Even the isn't government that stupid.
hmm, maybe.
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