Fasting-Revision- Exam Season 2019 Watch

ari.x
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Hey guys,
If any of you are fasting for Ramadan this year and have exams (GCSE or A-level) how are you finding it? I've got 3 2 + 3hour long A-level exams whilst I'm going to be fasting so I'm abit nervous but wanted to know how you guys find it
Also what are your revision routines for Ramadan? Do you revise after or before sunrise? Share your routines as I'm on study leave now and wanted to try out new things!
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hdconfused
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Hey. Same, I’m trying to change my routine too. When do you break your fast? And when do you begin it? For me studying after breaking the fast uptill dawn has been good.
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need3verify
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Mine is basically:
Wake up college revise iftar taraweeh sleep/revise/tv/whatever sehri sleep

(with prayers obviously)

Personally I am finding it fine, I had my revision done before Ramadhan, now it's just practise practise pracrise(recurring)

Just remember fasting is not a burden, everything in this life will be accounted for in the next and we control ourselves much better whilst fasting.

"the dunya is a prison for the believer and a paradise for an unbeliever" (something like that, but means a lot!)

Anyway, about time I break my fast!
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hdconfused
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Thank you for the reminder! True, we control ourselves better when we are fasting. And that’s great that you did all your revision before Ramadan, I made this harder on me by procrastinating my revision
(Original post by need3verify)
Mine is basically:
Wake up college revise iftar taraweeh sleep/revise/tv/whatever sehri sleep

(with prayers obviously)

Personally I am finding it fine, I had my revision done before Ramadhan, now it's just practise practise pracrise(recurring)

Just remember fasting is not a burden, everything in this life will be accounted for in the next and we control ourselves much better whilst fasting.

"the dunya is a prison for the believer and a paradise for an unbeliever" (something like that, but means a lot!)

Anyway, about time I break my fast!
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AsithU
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Or how about you accept that fasting will biologically deteriorate your brain and you will not be able to function as well as you usually do. Your sleep cycle is also messed up as a result of your fasting. Your studying will suffer, and your grades will fall. It's a shame your God requires this.

Do whatever you need to do to keep your beliefs intact; I'm in no place to argue against your religion.
But don't expect this to have no effect on your exams - something this drastic WILL mess with any human, there's no stopping that.
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hdconfused
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All of us do accept this. We do it, knowing that to an extent we will be physically and mentally affected. But we still do it, because time and time again we’ve seen how God has helped us through it previously. Countless of us have achieved brilliant grades, despite our entire world flipping 180 degrees, our biological clock and sleep patterns being overturned. Goes to show that faith can power you through, when food can’t. And lol trust me nobody failed an exam because they were fasting. Nobody eats or sleeps properly during exam season unfortunately, whether fasting or not fasting.
(Original post by AsithU)
Or how about you accept that fasting will biologically deteriorate your brain and you will not be able to function as well as you usually do. Your sleep cycle is also messed up as a result of your fasting. Your studying will suffer, and your grades will fall. It's a shame your God requires this.

Do whatever you need to do to keep your beliefs intact; I'm in no place to argue against your religion.
But don't expect this to have no effect on your exams - something this drastic WILL mess with any human, there's no stopping that.
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need3verify
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Lol I find it quite the opposite tbh, it's true your sleep cycle will be messed up, but there's plenty of time to sleep during the day and more so during study leave,but if you don't count the optional night prayers, you can sleep from 9 til 3 then 4 til 7 just fine.

However, the main point I'm trying to make is that fasting actually increases your focus, and as a result your knowledge. While we're fasting we don't blame that we're fasting for a lack of knowledge, we go and learn it, and it's even encouraged in the religion to seek knowledge. Says in the Quran-"My Lord, increase me in knowledge" and by doing so in the month of Ramadhan, we earn a multiple of greater reward then we normally would.

So there's basically no excuse not to revise / study lool. It's all about the mindset. Make it a good thing and it will be, make it bad and it will be still good but you will perceive it as bad. Try fasting one day, outside of the exam season though.
(Original post by AsithU)
Or how about you accept that fasting will biologically deteriorate your brain and you will not be able to function as well as you usually do. Your sleep cycle is also messed up as a result of your fasting. Your studying will suffer, and your grades will fall. It's a shame your God requires this.

Do whatever you need to do to keep your beliefs intact; I'm in no place to argue against your religion.
But don't expect this to have no effect on your exams - something this drastic WILL mess with any human, there's no stopping that.
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z.ainab
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(Original post by ari.x)
Hey guys,
If any of you are fasting for Ramadan this year and have exams (GCSE or A-level) how are you finding it? I've got 3 2 + 3hour long A-level exams whilst I'm going to be fasting so I'm abit nervous but wanted to know how you guys find it
Also what are your revision routines for Ramadan? Do you revise after or before sunrise? Share your routines as I'm on study leave now and wanted to try out new things!
Before sunrise for me! I tend to sleep after fajr salah and wake up at 6.30 / 7:00 am for college.
It’s difficult sitting exams during this period, however, it’s a blessed month, so we should be grateful that exam season has fallen right now. Put in as much effort as you can, revise hard and turn to Allah, as he is the best provider x
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Studentukht
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(Original post by AsithU)
Or how about you accept that fasting will biologically deteriorate your brain and you will not be able to function as well as you usually do. Your sleep cycle is also messed up as a result of your fasting. Your studying will suffer, and your grades will fall. It's a shame your God requires this.

Do whatever you need to do to keep your beliefs intact; I'm in no place to argue against your religion.
But don't expect this to have no effect on your exams - something this drastic WILL mess with any human, there's no stopping that.
Mate there’s lots of health benefits to fasting! Even non Muslims do it!!! Go do ur research your in no position to talk about if it’s good or not for the body your not a doctor lol
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AsithU
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(Original post by Studentukht)
Mate there’s lots of health benefits to fasting! Even non Muslims do it!!! Go do ur research your in no position to talk about if it’s good or not for the body your not a doctor lol
Ask a doctor.
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Yasmeen_xx
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No it’s a real shame that exams were put in the season we do fasting . It isn’t a shame , not if you actually researched the true health benefits of fasting .
Fasting will not inevitably give you bad grades,
many Muslims out there fast during exam period and still come out with A’s and A*’s and I would know because I’ve done it myself .
You are entitled to your own opinion , but don’t say things like ‘it’s a shame god did this to you’ , because if you were a Muslim you’d know for sure that it wasn’t like that .

To all the Muslims out there :
Remember Allah is the most merciful , forgiving creator . If you for whatever reason cannot fast due to exams or Ilness , then you have a whole year to make up for it .
(Original post by AsithU)
Or how about you accept that fasting will biologically deteriorate your brain and you will not be able to function as well as you usually do. Your sleep cycle is also messed up as a result of your fasting. Your studying will suffer, and your grades will fall. It's a shame your God requires this.

Do whatever you need to do to keep your beliefs intact; I'm in no place to argue against your religion.
But don't expect this to have no effect on your exams - something this drastic WILL mess with any human, there's no stopping that.
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AsithU
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(Original post by Yasmeen_xx)
It isn’t a shame , not if you actually researched the true health benefits of fasting .
If there are so many health benefits to fasting, why do you only do it when your religion demands that you do it?
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KawaiiArtist
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(Original post by AsithU)
If there are so many health benefits to fasting, why do you only do it when your religion demands that you do it?
It's not just in Ramadan when we fast, we can fast on almost any day, the prophet peace be upon him would often fast on a Monday& Thursday, spreading it out during the week. The times we can't fast are the days of celebration as they are days we are supposed to celebrate and indulge in eating. Ramadan for Muslims is the holy month where the Quran was revealed and we are ordered to fast unless someone falls under the category of being ill, or has a health condition, is pregnant, breast feeding, travellling etc as a person is not burdened beyond what they can bear. Fasting has many benefits, not only health wise as we are cleaning out our body, but during this month its a time of reflection, where we try to improve ourselves, for eg when fasting we are controlling our desire to eat and we are also encouraged to control our tongue (refrain from harmful speech etc) and improve our actions in general, bringing ourselves closer to our God.

Anyway addressing the actual question, last year I had my GCSE's in Ramadan and revised from iftar till suhur, and I would also revise a bit in the evening and morning, where I still have some energy/it's nearly time to eat. This Ramadan I've sort of been doing the same thing, just not as intense as I have no exams.
Last edited by KawaiiArtist; 1 day ago
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AsithU
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(Original post by KawaiiArtist)
It's not just in Ramadan when we fast, we can fast on almost any day, the prophet peace be upon him would often fast on a Monday& Thursday, spreading it out during the week. .
You can fast but you don't. People above are claiming there are health benefits to fasting. Religion aside, why don't you want these "health benefits" for more than a month?
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KawaiiArtist
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Okay, so...

1. Anyone CAN (generally, unless they have a health condition etc) fast whenever they want to, no one is saying they CAN'T fast when they want to, and who says they don't fast when they want to?

2. There are health benefits to fasting. That's a fact that logically makes sense.

3. Firstly, who says I don't want these health benefits for more than a month? Also, who says I don't get these health benefits for more than a month? One of the key benefits to fasting the whole month is we are not only cleansing our body, but we are building up the habit of watching what we eat and drink, how much we eat and drink. And as I said previously, I can fast when I want and get the benefits, and I'm sure most people would agree that fasting all the time would be extreme and damaging to ones health.

Also fasting is not just about abstaining from food. There is so much more wisdom behind it and so many benefits.
Its a time of spiritual reflection, improving ourselves and increasing our devotion and worship. Also it helps us develop our self control and appreciate what God has given us. For example, The Prophet said, "Whoever does not give up forged speech and evil actions, Allah (God) is not in need of his leaving his food and drink."


You can fast but you don't. People above are claiming there are health benefits to fasting. Religion aside, why don't you want these "health benefits" for more than a month?
Last edited by KawaiiArtist; 1 day ago
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AsithU
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(Original post by KawaiiArtist)
Okay, so...

1. Anyone CAN (generally, unless they have a health condition etc) fast whenever they want to, no one is saying they CAN'T fast when they want to, and who says they don't fast when they want to?

2. There are health benefits to fasting. That's a fact that logically makes sense.

3. Firstly, who says I don't want these health benefits for more than a month? Also, who says I don't get these health benefits for more than a month? One of the key benefits to fasting the whole month is we are not only cleansing our body, but we are building up the habit of watching what we eat and drink, how much we eat and drink. And as I said previously, I can fast when I want and get the benefits, and I'm sure most people would agree that fasting all the time would be extreme and damaging to ones health.

Also fasting is not just about abstaining from food. There is so much more wisdom behind it and so many benefits.
Its a time of spiritual reflection, improving ourselves and increasing our devotion and worship. Also it helps us develop our self control and appreciate what God has given us. For example, The Prophet said, "Whoever does not give up forged speech and evil actions, Allah (God) is not in need of his leaving his food and drink."

We're talking about health benefits. Medical health benefits. Stop bringing spirituality into it and show me that your argument lasts.

1) I have not met one Muslim who fasts outside of Ramadan. If there are health benefits, why don't YOU do it?
2) No, give me examples, stop avoiding the question. So far three people have said "health benefits" but the only example of one I have is your third point of "cleansing the body". You say you build up the habit of watching how much you eat and drink but you do not. Because as soon as Ramadan is over it's back to your old habits. Don't pretend this isn't the case.
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need3verify
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It's not only during Ramadhan that Muslims fast,we can fast most days of the year, but it's compulsory(for those who can) to do it during the month of Ramadhan, as it is spiritually a special month.

As for the health benefits, they are not the main reason people fast. It is a pillar of islam, so by not fasting they wouldnt be fulfilling their religious obligations.

Look up about the 27th(or last 10 days) of Ramadhan and see why its so special for Muslims.
(Original post by AsithU)
If there are so many health benefits to fasting, why do you only do it when your religion demands that you do it?
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KawaiiArtist
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I'm curious as to why you are so focused on this topic? I read the messages above and the way it comes across is that you, without any respect are insulting someones religion. Not every Muslim is going to fast outside of Ramadan, as its not obligatory, and health reasons are NOT the ONLY reason we fast as Muslims, as I and others have stated. Also, if you were actually concerned about their health and you want to advise someone, you do it in a nice manner. Why must you be so negative, no one is perfect, and of course some of us will fall back into our old habits, but its trying to better ourselves that is the key point. Not just in eating, but other areas too.

If you really are interested on the health benefits do some research, I don't have the time to explain nor ensure everything I say is scientifically correct, but if you want to feel some of what a fasting person feels, why not try fasting?

(Original post by AsithU)
We're talking about health benefits. Medical health benefits. Stop bringing spirituality into it and show me that your argument lasts.

1) I have not met one Muslim who fasts outside of Ramadan. If there are health benefits, why don't YOU do it?
2) No, give me examples, stop avoiding the question. So far three people have said "health benefits" but the only example of one I have is your third point of "cleansing the body". You say you build up the habit of watching how much you eat and drink but you do not. Because as soon as Ramadan is over it's back to your old habits. Don't pretend this isn't the case.
Last edited by KawaiiArtist; 1 day ago
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Randoman019
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Think you're one of those where being nice doesn't work.
Bottom line is, there are health benefits, but that's not why muslims do it.
They do it cos it's required in Islam.
When the month is over, they stop doing it, most never do it again, until the month rolls around the next year.
Most don't enjoy doing it.
If that was the case, it will be done left right and centre.
People who do it, if muslim, do it cos it's required, if you're not muslim and you do it, it's for your own "health" reason or whatever.
Either way, stop tryna cause trouble and stop crying a small thing that doesn't affect you in the slightest.
(Original post by AsithU)
We're talking about health benefits. Medical health benefits. Stop bringing spirituality into it and show me that your argument lasts.

1) I have not met one Muslim who fasts outside of Ramadan. If there are health benefits, why don't YOU do it?
2) No, give me examples, stop avoiding the question. So far three people have said "health benefits" but the only example of one I have is your third point of "cleansing the body". You say you build up the habit of watching how much you eat and drink but you do not. Because as soon as Ramadan is over it's back to your old habits. Don't pretend this isn't the case.
Last edited by Randoman019; 1 day ago
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12zamanf
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Im acc dying. I've just read your comments throughout this whole feed. You're saying that fasting is BIOLOGICALLY DAMAGING?

Have you even heard of this breakthrough by the Japanese Cell Biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi? He's a specialist in Autophagy. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine, why? Two main words, Cancer, Cure. He discovered that when we fast for 10-12 hours a day, the energy in the body is used up. With time, appetite becomes intense and the body resorts to engulfing cancer cells. He said we actually should fast 20 days a year to eradicate and kill cancer cells/potential for them too.

Honestly, the benefits to fasting are true, so you REALLY need to shut up, cause you sound absurd. You're no scientist or doctor. I fasted all my fasts during GCSE and came out with 11 grades: 4 A*, 4 A, 3 Bs. Don't even try to tell anyone that fasting will be harmful during exams. Numerous scientific discoveries have shown that fasting has benefits including boosting you to your brain's primal focus, fat loss, and ability to fuse stronger connections in the brain (better links between knowledge). Fasting is nature's most powerful natural antibiotic. Jus do your research.

Your argument saying "why don't you all fast outside of this month" is very very weak. What an absurd point to make, I find it difficult to take you seriously. Muslims aren't commanded to fast outside of this month, but they are ADVISED to fast twice every week (if they want). They are compulsory for 30 days to benefit us, possibly because LIKE YOU SAID; who would consider fasting for 30 days straight if it wasn't made obligatory? I doubt many people would do it. Lol, you answered your own question. I for one DO fast outside of this month, for health benefits. And believe me, there are many many others-muslims and non muslims- who do to. Its choice. So honestly that's a very weak weak argument. That's like saying...I can't even compare it to anything because it's so nonsensical.

Next time, think before you speak.
(Original post by AsithU)
We're talking about health benefits. Medical health benefits. Stop bringing spirituality into it and show me that your argument lasts.

1) I have not met one Muslim who fasts outside of Ramadan. If there are health benefits, why don't YOU do it?
2) No, give me examples, stop avoiding the question. So far three people have said "health benefits" but the only example of one I have is your third point of "cleansing the body". You say you build up the habit of watching how much you eat and drink but you do not. Because as soon as Ramadan is over it's back to your old habits. Don't pretend this isn't the case.
Last edited by 12zamanf; 1 day ago
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