Extra-curricular activities for Uni PS?!?!? Watch

Shibu the Doge
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Hi yall 👋🏽😔
Context : So today my school gave me a student info sheet to fill in (to get the teachers to write the teacher reference (?)) They asked if I have done any extracurricular activities outside of school. And then I was panicking because I haven’t done ANYTHING outside of school. I thought I don’t need any and only the grades matter (like in GCSEs)

My info:
A-level Physics
A-level Maths
A-level Chemistry
—> I’m in my first year of A-levels
—> I’m thinking of doing Physics/ Astrophysics/ Theoretical physics/ Astronomy in Uni

So what are some good extracurricular activities for me to do that will help me to stand out from others?

Thanks for reading all that and thank you for taking your time to help me!!!! 🤗
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Shibu the Doge
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Also I was thinking of doing a job at my physics or chemistry department in school for a start I don’t know if that’s a good idea or not
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PQ
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Just read some blogs and watch some online lectures/tv shows relevant to your subject
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artful_lounger
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Extracurricular activities aren't that important, universities in the UK are more interested in your particular commitment and awareness of your subject area. If you can undertake some activity related to your prospective subject area, such as Physics/Maths Olympiads, or science fairs (such as the Big Bang Fair) then that might be worth considering, but no university will expect that and outside of Oxbridge it's not even that common (and they specifically note that they are aware not all applicants will have had the opportunity to pursue those kinds of activities and so still don't expect them).

Doing some wider reading relevant to your subject might be worth doing e.g. over the summer though, and should be something most applicants can do reasonably. There are plenty of "pop" science books relating to physics which may be of interest which might be a good place to start. You may also be interested in some books on the history and/or philosophy of science/physics, which can help contextualise the development and "practice" of physics (or science more generally). The widely celebrated Feynman Lectures on Physics may also be worth checking out, and are available free online - these will give you an idea of how calculus is used in physics (as in degree level physics) and might help develop your physical intuition as well.

However don't let the above distract you from your studies as the main thing they are wanting to see is your ability to perform academically in relevant subject areas; ultimately wider reading etc, is just a side benefit secondary to you actually being able to understand and apply the subject material.
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Shibu the Doge
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Extracurricular activities aren't that important, universities in the UK are more interested in your particular commitment and awareness of your subject area. If you can undertake some activity related to your prospective subject area, such as Physics/Maths Olympiads, or science fairs (such as the Big Bang Fair) then that might be worth considering, but no university will expect that and outside of Oxbridge it's not even that common (and they specifically note that they are aware not all applicants will have had the opportunity to pursue those kinds of activities and so still don't expect them).

Doing some wider reading relevant to your subject might be worth doing e.g. over the summer though, and should be something most applicants can do reasonably. There are plenty of "pop" science books relating to physics which may be of interest which might be a good place to start. You may also be interested in some books on the history and/or philosophy of science/physics, which can help contextualise the development and "practice" of physics (or science more generally). The widely celebrated Feynman Lectures on Physics may also be worth checking out, and are available free online - these will give you an idea of how calculus is used in physics (as in degree level physics) and might help develop your physical intuition as well.

However don't let the above distract you from your studies as the main thing they are wanting to see is your ability to perform academically in relevant subject areas; ultimately wider reading etc, is just a side benefit secondary to you actually being able to understand and apply the subject material.
Thank you thank you thank you so much 🤗
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Benjamin McEvoy
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I got into Oxford without a single extracurricular activity.

Make sure your PASSION for your subject bleeds through the page and it won't matter that you haven't done any extracurriculars
(Original post by Revision Boiii)
Hi yall 👋🏽😔
Context : So today my school gave me a student info sheet to fill in (to get the teachers to write the teacher reference (?)) They asked if I have done any extracurricular activities outside of school. And then I was panicking because I haven’t done ANYTHING outside of school. I thought I don’t need any and only the grades matter (like in GCSEs)

My info:
A-level Physics
A-level Maths
A-level Chemistry
—> I’m in my first year of A-levels
—> I’m thinking of doing Physics/ Astrophysics/ Theoretical physics/ Astronomy in Uni

So what are some good extracurricular activities for me to do that will help me to stand out from others?

Thanks for reading all that and thank you for taking your time to help me!!!! 🤗
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Shibu the Doge
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(Original post by Benjamin McEvoy)
I got into Oxford without a single extracurricular activity.

Make sure your PASSION for your subject bleeds through the page and it won't matter that you haven't done any extracurriculars
:0 😱😱😱😱😱
What grades did you get if u don’t mind me asking
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Benjamin McEvoy
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A-Levels = 100% marks in English Literature, English Language, and Psychology. Dropped my other failing subjects.

GCSEs = Mainly As and A*s (back when that was a thing), and a few Bs
(Original post by Revision Boiii)
:0 😱😱😱😱😱
What grades did you get if u don’t mind me asking
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Shibu the Doge
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(Original post by Benjamin McEvoy)
A-Levels = 100% marks in English Literature, English Language, and Psychology. Dropped my other failing subjects.

GCSEs = Mainly As and A*s (back when that was a thing), and a few Bs
Wow 👏 👏 nice!
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mediclyfe
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Honestly if you can't think of one or can't find the time to commit to one, make it up... it's not like they'll ever know unless you choose something really obscure or you go to an interview and you've not done your research. I literally had no social life but I made it up and said I tutored year 8 and 9 students, and that I was involved in production arts with a local theatre group. And it worked
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