Lostx
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Philosophy

History

Psychology
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Jackudy3
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I'd say Philosophy and Psychology are fairly easy, which will give you extra time and leeway to be able to work on your difficult A-level, History.
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Lostx
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Thank you

My parents are against me studying Psychology because ‘it’s too close to home’ as I have a mental illness. Should I listen to them?
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CoolCavy
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History is certainly not easy.
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Lostx
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Is maths any easier?
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math42
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I did History at AS. It was my worst AS (against English Lit, Maths, Further Maths and Physics); one of the exams was pretty hard, the other was nice. There was a lot of memorization needed.
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Lostx
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So you did Maths at A-level... was this tricky?
(Original post by math42)
I did History at AS. It was my worst AS (against English Lit, Maths, Further Maths and Physics); one of the exams was pretty hard, the other was nice. There was a lot of memorization needed.
Thank you for your help btw
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math42
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(Original post by Lostx)
So you did Maths at A-level... was this tricky?

Thank you for your help btw
It was easy, but that was because I loved it and was happy to spend a lot of time doing it.
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rm.25
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(Original post by Lostx)
Is maths any easier?
I would say no, maths is one of the hardest a level
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artful_lounger
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A lot of psychology (if not most of it) has little to do with mental illness/psychopathology. Most of it will be learning about how the mind and brain works, stuff to do with development, perception, attention, memory etc. That said often courses do include a unit on psychopathology/abnormal psychology, as students are often interested in this area. But generally speaking it's usually not going to be a significant amount of the course though compared to other aspects of e.g. behavioural and cognitive psychology and (possibly) neurobiology.

The degree of difficulty of a given A-level subject is always relative to the persons particular learning style, interests, and motivations. A lot of people consider maths very difficult, for example, but often they are taking it not because they are genuinely interested in or enjoy maths, but because it is a means to an end (either a requirement for a course they might want to apply to, or because they think it "looks good" compared to other options) and so struggle with it. Those who are actually engaged with the material tend more often to do well and will not infrequently find it's quite "easy" for them.

Psychology has a lot of content to learn, as does history. If you're good at absorbing large amounts of information (and then drawing on that in exams) then it probably won't be necessarily that hard for you. If you're better at understanding principles and processes then applying those to problems (e.g. as in maths, physics and so on) it might be less well suited to your strengths. Choose your subjects based on your interests and strengths, rather than whether other people think they're easy or difficult. as you might find what someone else finds easy, you find difficult (and vice versa)!
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SanicSpeed
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I don't think you're gonna be able to get any meaningful answers to your question, because it doesn't really make sense as it stands. It's difficult to call any subjects 'objectively' easier than others, since how easy you find it depends on your own capabilities and also what grade you're aiming for. It would be better to just look for comments on the individuals modules describing in what ways they were easy/difficult and then comparing these with your own personal skills/tastes. Like acknowledging History requires a lot of memorisation, so would be 'easier' for those who can retain large amounts of (not very complex) information. As opposed to hearing someone say 'maths is so easy' or 'maths is so hard' and making a decision based on that totally useless information.
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sambeaz6
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Well A levels are A levels. All will require a huge amount of work, some requiring a lot of memorisation, some requiring problem solving, some requiring both. All will likely require the same number of study hours to succeed in, but spent doing different things. Sociology, for example, is seen as an easy subject and thr questions are really simple, but there is a huge amount of contet. To have enough knowledge to guarantee an A* you'd probably have to learn more than 200 names and like them to theories, criticisms, studies etc. None of the A levels are objectively easier, but some may be subjectively easier if you have the skills that help you to succeed in them.
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birthoftragedy
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Philosophy is easy if you genuinely enjoy it, have some knowledge of any philosophers already and read it in your own time, you also have to be fairy good at abstract and analytical thinking
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