Is taking a course at Uni solely because you enjoy it a good idea? Watch

TheNamesBond.
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I'm studying Philosophy as one of my A-Levels and it's really the only thing I enjoy studying, it doesn't even feel like work when I'm revising or jotting down notes, I'm in Year 12 and I've been thinking really hard lately about what I want to do at Uni, I've searched Unis around me and I've looked over courses and read over the content, modules for example, I can only see myself studying Philosophy.

I can't be sure if it's right though because I don't know what I'll do after, really not sure about this choice, I won't be starting next year anyway so I'm not applying this year then, which is a decision I've come to since I don't want to rush into Uni, I'd rather take a year out, save up, figure out what I want to do, you know, get my head straight.
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wolfmoon88
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(Original post by TheNamesBond.)
I'm studying Philosophy as one of my A-Levels and it's really the only thing I enjoy studying, it doesn't even feel like work when I'm revising or jotting down notes, I'm in Year 12 and I've been thinking really hard lately about what I want to do at Uni, I've searched Unis around me and I've looked over courses and read over the content, modules for example, I can only see myself studying Philosophy.

I can't be sure if it's right though because I don't know what I'll do after, really not sure about this choice, I won't be starting next year anyway so I'm not applying this year then, which is a decision I've come to since I don't want to rush into Uni, I'd rather take a year out, save up, figure out what I want to do, you know, get my head straight.
You will only really do well (get something out of it) if you truly enjoy it so in that sense it is definitely not a bad idea. Not rushing into university is also a great decision, definitely take some time to think about it.

In terms of philosophy as a course choice, it wouldn't be a bad idea in terms of employment. Critical Thinking is a highly valued soft skill in the workforce. Logic also allows for people to make more thoughtful decisions (rational) and understand argumentation.
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harrysbar
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It would be like any other non vocational course in terms of career prospects - like English, History, Languages or Sociology/Psychology, there is no clearly defined career area to go into. Lots of people studying subjects like this go on to do a vocational Masters in subjects as diverse as Law, Human Resources, Marketing and Business. Or they apply for general graduate schemes where your degree subject doesn’t matter
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Oxford Mum
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Doing the course because you love it is the best possible motivation I can think of. And not rushing it? What an eminently sensible person you are!!! Now take care to work hard for those a levels to get the best marks you can. Good marks will widen your choice. And from your post, I am confident you will take equal care over which uni you choose. Visit a few and feel those vibes. It’s like falling in love: you know when it feels right
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skw123
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Really depends on what job you want to do. However, there are so many jobs these days that ask for any degree discipline. So doing something you enjoy at uni makes the 3/4 years a lot less stressful.
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mgi
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I would disagree with simply doing a uni course because you find it interesting; there should be an associated plan that you have as to what you would do with it once you have spent so much time,effort and money doing it. There are so many unemployed graduates/graduates working in non degree related fields. Non graduates are financially out performing a lot of graduates probably because 3-4 years of work related training and less debt works better than just doing an interesting degree!
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TheNamesBond.
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(Original post by skw123)
Really depends on what job you want to do. However, there are so many jobs these days that ask for any degree discipline. So doing something you enjoy at uni makes the 3/4 years a lot less stressful.
That's the thing, I don't know what job I want to do, and I don't feel confident in going to Uni not knowing what I want to do after, I have no interest in that whatsoever.

I need to be sure about what I'm going to do after Uni, or at least have some sort of idea, last thing I want is to spend all that money and end up with no paths that I find interesting.

I don't want to teach, I have no interest in banking or anything related like accounting, advertising or marketing, neither do I have any interest in journalism.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by TheNamesBond.)
I don't want to teach, I have no interest in banking or anything related like accounting, advertising or marketing, neither do I have any interest in journalism.
What jobs sound better than those jobs to you?
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swelshie
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It's a good idea to know roughly what you want to do early on in a degree to be able to work towards the skills/knowledge/attributes needed for the kinds of roles you'd be applying to at the end. You're right in thinking that deciding what you want to do in life after you graduate is not going to work as well or at least be more difficult. You'd basically be treating university as a kind of welfare and that sticks out like a sore thumb to an employer.

It's also not the case that "oh it's free I might as well do it". You're not really treated the same afterwards. Also career choices/changes that are viable while you are still living at home become less so when you're working full time and have bills to pay etc (in both time and cost).

So best to do it right first time.
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ltsmith
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you can get into many careers with a philosophy degree but beware grad schemes often have up to 100 people applying for a single place.

do a degree apprenticeship. you get paid to study and you get real world working experience.
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elcalvo
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(Original post by TheNamesBond.)
I'm studying Philosophy as one of my A-Levels and it's really the only thing I enjoy studying, it doesn't even feel like work when I'm revising or jotting down notes, I'm in Year 12 and I've been thinking really hard lately about what I want to do at Uni, I've searched Unis around me and I've looked over courses and read over the content, modules for example, I can only see myself studying Philosophy.

I can't be sure if it's right though because I don't know what I'll do after, really not sure about this choice, I won't be starting next year anyway so I'm not applying this year then, which is a decision I've come to since I don't want to rush into Uni, I'd rather take a year out, save up, figure out what I want to do, you know, get my head straight.
I chose to do my degree in Geography because I was good at it and enjoyed it at A level, but now I'm just finishing placement year and heading into final year and regret so much about my choice. My degree has focussed mainly on physical geography and the earth and I've now lost all passion and motivation for the subject, and with no clear route into a career that remotely interests me I'm worried about what I'll do when I graduate.

My advice would be to use the year out to really think hard about what you want to do both at uni but also long-term, and then base your degree choice loosely around that. Try to pick something that either leads into something you've got great interest in or something that will leave your options wide open, don't box yourself into a specific field and then lose all interest like I did.
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mgi
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(Original post by elcalvo)
I chose to do my degree in Geography because I was good at it and enjoyed it at A level, but now I'm just finishing placement year and heading into final year and regret so much about my choice. My degree has focussed mainly on physical geography and the earth and I've now lost all passion and motivation for the subject, and with no clear route into a career that remotely interests me I'm worried about what I'll do when I graduate.

My advice would be to use the year out to really think hard about what you want to do both at uni but also long-term, and then base your degree choice loosely around that. Try to pick something that either leads into something you've got great interest in or something that will leave your options wide open, don't box yourself into a specific field and then lose all interest like I did.
Yes, i would go so far as to say that doing a degree without an employment plan that is likely to work after one graduates is fundamentally a waste of time and money; "interest " is just not enough unless you are not wanting a job out of it.
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gjd800
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Degree apprenticeships are a great route for a lot of people and I think more should seriously consider them.

With that said, reading philosophy is great and the doors that are open to you afterwards are diverse. I've had mates with average phil degrees go into govt, the Home Office, law, finance, writing for online news outlets. it doesn't close any doors unless you want to be an engineer or a medic, really.
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Oxford Mum
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Joinedup
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(Original post by gjd800)
Degree apprenticeships are a great route for a lot of people and I think more should seriously consider them.

With that said, reading philosophy is great and the doors that are open to you afterwards are diverse. I've had mates with average phil degrees go into govt, the Home Office, law, finance, writing for online news outlets. it doesn't close any doors unless you want to be an engineer or a medic, really.
I agree that degree apprenticeships are great - they're also very competitive. getting into a uni these days... not so much tbh.

Phil can and does work out for people - mostly I suspect the ones who don't fall so in love with their subject that they neglect to apply for internships etc.
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gjd800
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(Original post by Joinedup)
mostly I suspect the ones who don't fall so in love with their subject that they neglect to apply for internships etc.
Yeah, I do wonder sometimes. I see posts like 'I graduated 4 years ago with a first in STEM and still live in my nan's fridge' etc on here and think 'how have you managed to let this slip past you?' Diligence always required, as with anything!
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hallamstudents
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(Original post by TheNamesBond.)
I'm studying Philosophy as one of my A-Levels and it's really the only thing I enjoy studying, it doesn't even feel like work when I'm revising or jotting down notes, I'm in Year 12 and I've been thinking really hard lately about what I want to do at Uni, I've searched Unis around me and I've looked over courses and read over the content, modules for example, I can only see myself studying Philosophy.

I can't be sure if it's right though because I don't know what I'll do after, really not sure about this choice, I won't be starting next year anyway so I'm not applying this year then, which is a decision I've come to since I don't want to rush into Uni, I'd rather take a year out, save up, figure out what I want to do, you know, get my head straight.
Hey, yeah i think that sounds great. If you enjoy it then you should naturally do better in it. Have a think and maybe chat to people who have done psychology at uni and ask them what they think?
Sophia
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