NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTION OF HALOGENALKANES simple question

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JacobBob
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What I understand is that if a hydroxide was added to a halogenalkane in aqueous conditions, an alcohol is produced. But if a hydroxide was added to a halogenalkane in ethanolic conditions, an alkene is produced.

If that is true, then how can I add an organic "cosolvent" to the first mixture and still get an alcohol ? In fact, how can I use ethanol and still get and alcohol ?

I saw it in a past paper question , the question was on forming alcohols from halogenalkanes and they asked why ethanol was used in place of water as a solvent
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charco
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It's all about the conditions. HOT, ethanolic strong/concentrated sodium hydroxide solution forms the ethoxide ion, which is the dehydrohalogenating agent.

For hydrolysis, you need to heat the halogenoalkane with an excess of water in the presence of hydroxide ions.

Both reactions are competing, so you adjust the conditions to try to ensure a maximum yield of the desired product.
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