Would you not want the money? Watch

Anonymous #1
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I am a student but also do some work which pays around £20 per hour, sometimes more. This is more than most students are able to earn and I feel that it would be crazy not do to as much of this work as possible, since sometimes there is no limit on how much I can do. So often I find myself working all hours and hardly spending any time on my course. I don't spend any of the money but it seems amazing to build up some decent savings. I feel that I'm not doing as well on my course as if I didn't do the work and it's not as though I need the money now, however don't you think that it makes sense to earn what I can since even if I do less well on my course, having savings is good and graduate jobs don't even generally pay as much as what I am earning, even though it is for unskilled work!

My family disapproves of the work and thinks I shouldn't do it at all as I don't need the money but then they're often tight with money which doesn't make sense really.
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am a student but also do some work which pays around £20 per hour, sometimes more. This is more than most students are able to earn and I feel that it would be crazy not do to as much of this work as possible, since sometimes there is no limit on how much I can do. So often I find myself working all hours and hardly spending any time on my course. I don't spend any of the money but it seems amazing to build up some decent savings. I feel that I'm not doing as well on my course as if I didn't do the work and it's not as though I need the money now, however don't you think that it makes sense to earn what I can since even if I do less well on my course, having savings is good and graduate jobs don't even generally pay as much as what I am earning, even though it is for unskilled work!

My family disapproves of the work and thinks I shouldn't do it at all as I don't need the money but then they're often tight with money which doesn't make sense really.
I wouldn’t want the money to be honest. If I wasn’t doing well in the course, i would do less time of that job and focus on catching up so I get my degree so I can get a better job in the long term. I think your parents wants you to focus on your studies I think that’s why they disapprove.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
I wouldn’t want the money to be honest. If I wasn’t doing well in the course, i would do less time of that job and focus on catching up so I get my degree so I can get a better job in the long term. I think your parents wants you to focus on your studies I think that’s why they disapprove.
But what if I never manage to get a graduate job and then I've missed out on this good money, which is sometimes actually more like £30 an hour?
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Simonthegreat
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What is it you do and how many hours per day/week?
(Original post by Anonymous)
But what if I never manage to get a graduate job and then I've missed out on this good money, which is sometimes actually more like £30 an hour?
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am a student but also do some work which pays around £20 per hour, sometimes more. This is more than most students are able to earn and I feel that it would be crazy not do to as much of this work as possible, since sometimes there is no limit on how much I can do. So often I find myself working all hours and hardly spending any time on my course. I don't spend any of the money but it seems amazing to build up some decent savings. I feel that I'm not doing as well on my course as if I didn't do the work and it's not as though I need the money now, however don't you think that it makes sense to earn what I can since even if I do less well on my course, having savings is good and graduate jobs don't even generally pay as much as what I am earning, even though it is for unskilled work!

My family disapproves of the work and thinks I shouldn't do it at all as I don't need the money but then they're often tight with money which doesn't make sense really.
Sounds like you don't really want to be on this course, and you're distracting yourself from it by working. I think you need to make a choice between the job or your studies. Decide which is more important to you. There isn't a right answer btw, choose whichever makes you happiest. But you're just wasting time, money and resources studying if you aren't committed to it.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am a student but also do some work which pays around £20 per hour, sometimes more. This is more than most students are able to earn and I feel that it would be crazy not do to as much of this work as possible, since sometimes there is no limit on how much I can do. So often I find myself working all hours and hardly spending any time on my course. I don't spend any of the money but it seems amazing to build up some decent savings. I feel that I'm not doing as well on my course as if I didn't do the work and it's not as though I need the money now, however don't you think that it makes sense to earn what I can since even if I do less well on my course, having savings is good and graduate jobs don't even generally pay as much as what I am earning, even though it is for unskilled work!

My family disapproves of the work and thinks I shouldn't do it at all as I don't need the money but then they're often tight with money which doesn't make sense really.
Your degree will be with you for life, so you need to decide if you want to commit to it and do well, not commit the time and get a poorer degree classification than you are capable of, or drop out and focus on working.
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doodle_333
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What do you do? I made £12-15 an hour as a student and though it was good! Uni is going to affect your life much more than saving an extra few k now, I would say cut back and focus on your studies.
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Anonymous #1
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Thanks for the replies everyone. I'm sure you'll understand that I would prefer not to divulge what I do as others would take the bread from my mouth so to speak if I did - to that end, it isn't a stable job but is good work while it lasts. Savings do stay with you for life if you keep them and consider this, if you save just 20 grand, say, then you could probably afford a gym membership for life. Build up more savings and there's no limit to what you could have covered for life!

I do think it would be a shame to quit my course but having a lower classification but more savings then my student loan doesn't seem bad does it? I'm sure lots of people would be happy to take a lower classification if their fees were waived.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I do think it would be a shame to quit my course but having a lower classification but more savings then my student loan doesn't seem bad does it? I'm sure lots of people would be happy to take a lower classification if their fees were waived.
The lower classification could make you less employable though, and given that you openly admit that your current situation won't last forever, it seems a bit silly to overlook the long term ramifications of poor performance during your degree. Savings are great while they last, but if you can't get a job or fall into difficulties, those savings could disappear pretty quickly.

Why did you choose to do a degree in the first place btw?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
The lower classification could make you less employable though, and given that you openly admit that your current situation won't last forever, it seems a bit silly to overlook the long term ramifications of poor performance during your degree. Savings are great while they last, but if you can't get a job or fall into difficulties, those savings could disappear pretty quickly.

Why did you choose to do a degree in the first place btw?
Because that's what my family wanted and I didn't know I'd find this work.

Another way of looking at it is I may never get a graduate job as I am rubbish at interviews, so then I could have no job anyway but no savings.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Because that's what my family wanted and I didn't know I'd find this work.

Another way of looking at it is I may never get a graduate job as I am rubbish at interviews, so then I could have no job anyway but no savings.
It sounds like you're set on doing your work, so maybe you should stop your degree and focus fully on your work in that case?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
It sounds like you're set on doing your work, so maybe you should stop your degree and focus fully on your work in that case?
But then if it dries up I'm a bit stuck and also my parents wouldn't be happy.
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ltsmith
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what is your degree ?
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Anonymous)
But then if it dries up I'm a bit stuck and also my parents wouldn't be happy.
But then you said you'd have your savings, and as I said, a lower degree classification is difficult (or impossible) to explain away to employers. You need to think about your long term goals rather than focusing purely on short term gains.
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RandomTennisfan
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I think like Drawtheline said you need to make a decision on either course or work, it will be impossible or very hard to make both work currently something has to give. Just think your course should set you up for a better future to earn money, but however if you’re really disengaged then it might be best to carry on working.
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bones-mccoy
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It doesn't sound like you're that bothered about the degree so I'd really think about whether it's worth carrying on with university. As you've said this job is only short term, whatever money you make will surely be spent on expenses after you graduate and are struggling to find jobs with whatever grade classification you end up with. Money doesn't last forever, especially not in this climate where the cost of living is so high, but a degree will.

Whatever you do, make sure you look at the long-term issues rather than just short-term. Perhaps you'll find something which really engages you and eventually return to study or new training in the future, maybe the high paying work will work out and become more stable, who knows?
Last edited by bones-mccoy; 4 days ago
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Anonymous #1
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Cheers guys, it's not true that I'm not bothered about the degree, it's just a lot of money not to earn.
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