mwindram
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Doing biology, chemistry definitely.

struggling with maths atm for GCSE but haven't studied geography for GCSE.

probably going into something like biology or medicine

Parents aren't keen on me doing geography as they believe I will be behind.

Help anyone?!
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watershower
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DO WHAT YOU ENJOY
If you are only doing maths because it is an option, you will fail. It’s hard and easy to fall behind on.
Why do you want to do medicine? Make sure have passion for it, because it is rigorous and very competitive.
If your school lets you, start with all of them and then you can drop one in your second year.
Best of luck
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Afterlife?
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there are a few people at my school who do bio maths and geography and they have offers for medicine just like those who do maths, so its not anything significant
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neko no basu
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To be honest, biology and chemistry and maths would be a better combination than geography with biology and chem, especially if you want to go into medicine. To do medicine, they do look for you to have chemistry and then biology/physics/maths so if that's your career aspiration then I would recommend you to do maths. However, I'm not looking into studying medicine myself so I don't know how important maths is for someone wanting to go into biology/medicine.

I do however, take geography and I'm really enjoying it but then my other subjects are very humanities and essay based, and not biology or chemistry. The fact that you have not taken it at GCSE could potentially cause you to fall behind just because other people in the class have probably all done it at GCSE. A level geography is really not too much of an upgrade from GCSE so it's not a massive jump. Human geography tends to be more straightforward, physical geography on the other hand is a bit harder. If you are motivated to do well and work hard then you will be fine.
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mwindram
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I really love the enjoyment and gratitude of helping people, it feels great.

I've got a taster for geography in June after GCSEs so will have to see then.

Thanks
(Original post by watershower)
DO WHAT YOU ENJOY
If you are only doing maths because it is an option, you will fail. It’s hard and easy to fall behind on.
Why do you want to do medicine? Make sure have passion for it, because it is rigorous and very competitive.
If your school lets you, start with all of them and then you can drop one in your second year.
Best of luck
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mwindram
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thank you so much for your reply, your advice is really helpful.
the course I think is both physical and human with some coursework. The college have said it is okay for me to do geography, I will just have to wait and see
(Original post by neko no basu)
To be honest, biology and chemistry and maths would be a better combination than geography with biology and chem, especially if you want to go into medicine. To do medicine, they do look for you to have chemistry and then biology/physics/maths so if that's your career aspiration then I would recommend you to do maths. However, I'm not looking into studying medicine myself so I don't know how important maths is for someone wanting to go into biology/medicine.

I do however, take geography and I'm really enjoying it but then my other subjects are very humanities and essay based, and not biology or chemistry. The fact that you have not taken it at GCSE could potentially cause you to fall behind just because other people in the class have probably all done it at GCSE. A level geography is really not too much of an upgrade from GCSE so it's not a massive jump. Human geography tends to be more straightforward, physical geography on the other hand is a bit harder. If you are motivated to do well and work hard then you will be fine.
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Lelux
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biology and chemistry and geography is actually a very convenient and good combination as they provide such a wide range of skills. for example i myslef take maths physics economics and geography for alevel and they offer me both essay based and quantitative based skills Universities prefer this so are more likely to consider me as a more successful applicant.
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Lelux
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furthermore i would like to add that maths definetely does not give you an advantage if you plan to do medicine. this year 70 people in my 6th form got into a medical based course at university where all 70 took chemistry however only 20 took maths.
(Original post by neko no basu)
To be honest, biology and chemistry and maths would be a better combination than geography with biology and chem, especially if you want to go into medicine. To do medicine, they do look for you to have chemistry and then biology/physics/maths so if that's your career aspiration then I would recommend you to do maths. However, I'm not looking into studying medicine myself so I don't know how important maths is for someone wanting to go into biology/medicine.

I do however, take geography and I'm really enjoying it but then my other subjects are very humanities and essay based, and not biology or chemistry. The fact that you have not taken it at GCSE could potentially cause you to fall behind just because other people in the class have probably all done it at GCSE. A level geography is really not too much of an upgrade from GCSE so it's not a massive jump. Human geography tends to be more straightforward, physical geography on the other hand is a bit harder. If you are motivated to do well and work hard then you will be fine.
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neko no basu
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It's just that most people I know who are considering medicine have taken maths and none of taken geography, which is why I assumed it to be a better mix. As I haven't studied medicine myself I don't know how useful maths A level will be to a medicine degree but I do know that universities recommend maths (although not a requirement) as an A level option, but since OP is going to study biology and chemistry anyway, it doesn't matter too much.
(Original post by Lelux)
furthermore i would like to add that maths definetely does not give you an advantage if you plan to do medicine. this year 70 people in my 6th form got into a medical based course at university where all 70 took chemistry however only 20 took maths.
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neko no basu
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I think your points are very valid and doing geography in addition to bio and chem makes you a well-rounded applicant. I do think however, it depends more on the grades you get. So if you get an A* in biology, an A in chemistry and a A in geography, then they're obviously going to consider you more than someone that got an A* in biology, an A in chemistry and a B in maths.
(Original post by Lelux)
biology and chemistry and geography is actually a very convenient and good combination as they provide such a wide range of skills. for example i myslef take maths physics economics and geography for alevel and they offer me both essay based and quantitative based skills Universities prefer this so are more likely to consider me as a more successful applicant.
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Lelux
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ye thats true i guess ive always been good and fond of all the subjects im currently taking so i find it easier to enjoy and get goods grades in them.
(Original post by neko no basu)
I think your points are very valid and doing geography in addition to bio and chem makes you a well-rounded applicant. I do think however, it depends more on the grades you get. So if you get an A* in biology, an A in chemistry and a A in geography, then they're obviously going to consider you more than someone that got an A* in biology, an A in chemistry and a B in maths.
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neko no basu
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out of interest, you said earlier that you do maths, physics, economics and physics. Are you taking one for AS or 4 A levels? Because if you do, wow! That's so impressive.
(Original post by Lelux)
ye thats true i guess ive always been good and fond of all the subjects im currently taking so i find it easier to enjoy and get goods grades in them.
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jamesbarry17
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You need to make these choices as personal as possible, but if you ask me, and I did AS maths and am finishing A Level geography, I would say geography is easier but maths is worth doing if you can. You need to be really up for it though. I got A* maths GCSE but A Level was too much because I wasn't up to it in terms of the level of effort needed. Geography is a bit easier as long as you are naturally decent at it.
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mwindram
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I haven't done geography at GCSE so I'm thinking I might be a bit behind, I am a quick learner though. My predicated for maths GCSE is an 8 (a*) but last mock I got a 7 so I'm not sure. Thanks
(Original post by jamesbarry17)
You need to make these choices as personal as possible, but if you ask me, and I did AS maths and am finishing A Level geography, I would say geography is easier but maths is worth doing if you can. You need to be really up for it though. I got A* maths GCSE but A Level was too much because I wasn't up to it in terms of the level of effort needed. Geography is a bit easier as long as you are naturally decent at it.
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artful_lounger
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You don't need an A* in GCSE Maths to take, or even to do well in, A-level Maths. However, if you don't enjoy it or struggle to keep on top of the material now, it's debatable whether that will improve in A-level (although on the interest front, I can say at least I found the A-level Maths material a lot more interesting than GCSE Maths, which I found quite tedious and dull). Maths is a subject that requires a strong on-going commitment to it, doing problems every week if not one or two every day, to reinforce your learning. The only way to really learn maths (at least at A-level standard) is to practice it constantly. If motivation might be a struggle with that, that can make it harder to keep up and get a good result.

A-level Geography is a perfectly fine choice otherwise, either for medicine or in the sciences besides. Only one medical school that I'm aware of normally expects 3 STEM subjects (Cambridge), and all the others seem to care very little about which subject you take as your third (previously UCL had language indicating it "welcomed a contrasting subject" although I think this has been removed now). For medicine some aspects of geography may well be relevant (e.g. elements of demography), while in the sciences any aspect could be relevant (e.g. demography, environmental policy and sciences, physical geography and geology, ecology etc).

Whether the lack of GCSE Geography will be an issue is down to your school; if they accept students who haven't done the GCSE, then nominally they shouldn't expect that material, or should be able to provide you with advice and/or suggested reading over the summer. Some schools do require you to take the GCSE, as they structure their teaching around the assumption you have taken it. I don't know to what extent the GCSE material is "carried over" to the A-level, whether it is developed further or simply reframed in a different context though...
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Deggs_14
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I do geography, maths, chemistry and French a level, and I’d say a career in medicine is definitely better with maths in your case. However, do what you enjoy. Don’t worry about being behind for geography a level, it’s all brand new content that builds on the knowledge of science GCSE mainly. Also geography is 20% coursework, and you need to do a “Non Examined Assessment”, which is planning, collecting and writing up a large data collection report, which takes months and months and is so draining. I’d stick with maths, bio and chem. I got a 9 at GCSE maths and a B in my year 12 mock. Not to say that’s bad, but I’m struggling with maths as it doesn’t come naturally to me. A career in medicine maths, bio and chem is the way to go, but do what you’d be most confident and enjoy doing.
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mwindram
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I have emailed the college and they say that I am able to take geography if I want to despite not studying it for GCSE
(Original post by artful_lounger)
You don't need an A* in GCSE Maths to take, or even to do well in, A-level Maths. However, if you don't enjoy it or struggle to keep on top of the material now, it's debatable whether that will improve in A-level (although on the interest front, I can say at least I found the A-level Maths material a lot more interesting than GCSE Maths, which I found quite tedious and dull). Maths is a subject that requires a strong on-going commitment to it, doing problems every week if not one or two every day, to reinforce your learning. The only way to really learn maths (at least at A-level standard) is to practice it constantly. If motivation might be a struggle with that, that can make it harder to keep up and get a good result.

A-level Geography is a perfectly fine choice otherwise, either for medicine or in the sciences besides. Only one medical school that I'm aware of normally expects 3 STEM subjects (Cambridge), and all the others seem to care very little about which subject you take as your third (previously UCL had language indicating it "welcomed a contrasting subject" although I think this has been removed now). For medicine some aspects of geography may well be relevant (e.g. elements of demography), while in the sciences any aspect could be relevant (e.g. demography, environmental policy and sciences, physical geography and geology, ecology etc).

Whether the lack of GCSE Geography will be an issue is down to your school; if they accept students who haven't done the GCSE, then nominally they shouldn't expect that material, or should be able to provide you with advice and/or suggested reading over the summer. Some schools do require you to take the GCSE, as they structure their teaching around the assumption you have taken it. I don't know to what extent the GCSE material is "carried over" to the A-level, whether it is developed further or simply reframed in a different context though...
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Elliottmanwaring
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(Original post by watershower)
DO WHAT YOU ENJOY
If you are only doing maths because it is an option, you will fail. It’s hard and easy to fall behind on.
Why do you want to do medicine? Make sure have passion for it, because it is rigorous and very competitive.
If your school lets you, start with all of them and then you can drop one in your second year.
Best of luck
^I think this is an outrageous statement. Maths is a difficult alevel but there are plenty of people who did it in my year just because it is good as a CV booster and they did absolutely fine. In all honesty, Alevel maths actually isn't that hard relative to Chemistry or Biology. It doesn't have as much content and once you've done 20 past papers, you've basically done all of the types of questions you can be asked and so it makes revising for maths at alevel 1. pretty easy and 2. quite fun and rewarding. Alevel maths is a sick course, I really enjoyed it all the way through and would advocate it to anyone with an interest in science. Particularly, if you're thinking about medicine (I'm currently a medical student), it's pretty hard to get into medicine and maths looks so good on an application because if you can do maths, it tells the admissions tutor you're a pretty intelligent person. Not that geo doesn't say that either, but if I had to hedge my bets, I'd say maths looks better. In addition, I know that geography is literally rote learning a ton of facts and so that with biology sounds like a pretty hefty year of rote learning..

In terms of your Alevels, I would probably start off with four if you're thinking of applying for medicine. Try to stick to it because med is competitive and loads of people will have four so try not to fall behind on that stage. I did Bio, Chem, Phys, Maths, EPQ and found it manageable and if your heart is set on medicine I'm sure you can do it. As long as you're motivated and passionate to get into medical school, you can do it. You've just gotta make sure you want it and you'll always do the work for it if it's what you truly want. I never found working hard at alevel very hard once i was truly dead set on medicine, it's the once you've got in part that is hard to stay motivated for...

As I say, I would probs go for the maths if you're choosing between them, if you want medicine you'll work for it and that's all it takes to be good at alevel maths. Practice makes perfect and when you're super motivated you'll be revising like mad to do well so it shouldn't be a problem. If you ever have any questions about medicine or applying you're welcome to message me whenever.

Good luck with ur application mwindram
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username8408717
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(Original post by mwindram)
Doing biology, chemistry definitely.

struggling with maths atm for GCSE but haven't studied geography for GCSE.

probably going into something like biology or medicine

Parents aren't keen on me doing geography as they believe I will be behind.

Help anyone?!
What are your predicted grades for both those subjects?
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Elliottmanwaring
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
You don't need an A* in GCSE Maths to take, or even to do well in, A-level Maths. However, if you don't enjoy it or struggle to keep on top of the material now, it's debatable whether that will improve in A-level (although on the interest front, I can say at least I found the A-level Maths material a lot more interesting than GCSE Maths, which I found quite tedious and dull). Maths is a subject that requires a strong on-going commitment to it, doing problems every week if not one or two every day, to reinforce your learning. The only way to really learn maths (at least at A-level standard) is to practice it constantly. If motivation might be a struggle with that, that can make it harder to keep up and get a good result.

A-level Geography is a perfectly fine choice otherwise, either for medicine or in the sciences besides. Only one medical school that I'm aware of normally expects 3 STEM subjects (Cambridge), and all the others seem to care very little about which subject you take as your third (previously UCL had language indicating it "welcomed a contrasting subject" although I think this has been removed now). For medicine some aspects of geography may well be relevant (e.g. elements of demography), while in the sciences any aspect could be relevant (e.g. demography, environmental policy and sciences, physical geography and geology, ecology etc).

Whether the lack of GCSE Geography will be an issue is down to your school; if they accept students who haven't done the GCSE, then nominally they shouldn't expect that material, or should be able to provide you with advice and/or suggested reading over the summer. Some schools do require you to take the GCSE, as they structure their teaching around the assumption you have taken it. I don't know to what extent the GCSE material is "carried over" to the A-level, whether it is developed further or simply reframed in a different context though...
Back this completely, Alevel maths is totally different to GCSE. Yeah, you use some of the basic principles from GCSE but you stop doing all that boring reflecting shapes and drawing bar graphs.. You actually get to do some pretty cool stuff, I very nearly chose to do maths as my 5th choice when I was applying to do medicine (went for biomed in the end. typical ik) because the alevel course is so fun. I may have bigged it up a bit, it's not a party or anything.. But you honestly do get a nice bit of satisfaction out for alevel maths once you start doing enough past papers and really understanding the maths you're doing,.
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