Why does the fight or flight response use the endocrine system?

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Grace0301
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Hi everyone
I would ask my teacher this but they are not replying to my emails
I was wondering why the fight or flight response uses hormones if hormones are so much slower to take effect? In fact I suppose my question is how does adrenaline take effect so fast? Or perhaps I am mistaken. I understand that the combination of neural and endocrine activity amplifies the fight or flight response, but I don't really understand how that can be effective if hormones rely on the bloodstream which is a lot slower than neural pathways.

Thanks guys
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bethwantsdeath
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it uses the HPAC (hormone) pathway when the stressor is chronic and continuous, but the quicker SAM pathway for immediate action
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by Grace0301)
Hi everyone
I would ask my teacher this but they are not replying to my emails
I was wondering why the fight or flight response uses hormones if hormones are so much slower to take effect? In fact I suppose my question is how does adrenaline take effect so fast? Or perhaps I am mistaken. I understand that the combination of neural and endocrine activity amplifies the fight or flight response, but I don't really understand how that can be effective if hormones rely on the bloodstream which is a lot slower than neural pathways.

Thanks guys
The fight or flight response uses both a neural and an endocrine response. The increased sympathetic activity will increase heart rate and contractility, divert blood from GI tract to skeletal muscles, cause pupil dilation, etc. The increased sympathetic activity also causes the adrenal medulla to secrete more catecholamines (mainly adrenaline but also noradrenaline and dopamine) into the blood. The adrenal medulla is made of up chromaffin cells, which are essentially modified post-ganglionic neurones, which rather than synapsing with an effector, just spills the adrenaline/noradrenaline into the blood (rather than forming a neuromuscular junction).
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