Pupils taking English IGCSE discover they've been taught the wrong book

Watch
shooks
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
A private school has apologised after teaching its pupils the wrong book for their English Literature IGCSE exam.

Year 11 pupils at Malvern St James Girls' School in Worcestershire had been taught Spies by Michael Frayn for the past two years.

But when they opened their exam papers on Wednesday morning, they discovered no questions about the text - because it was not on the 2019 syllabus.

Read the full Pupils taking English exam taught the wrong book article and join in the discussion by posting a message below.
1
reply
username4310824
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
How on earth did the teacher not realise?
5
reply
shooks
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by MinaBee)
How on earth did the teacher not realise?
It was on the syllabus in the two previous years, but taken off in 2019. Still - incredible that nobody checked!
4
reply
username3040480
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by shooks)
Here's where you can post a comment about our Pupils taking English exam taught the wrong book article.

Read the full Pupils taking English exam taught the wrong book article and join in the discussion by posting a message below.
what 2 years and no one noticed? how does that even happen?
0
reply
_gcx
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
It's a wonder how any teacher can be this incompetent.
5
reply
Notnek
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
I wonder if CIE can do anything? If a student has a bad teacher then that wouldn’t count as special consideration. Does serious incompetence count?

If the school did GCSEs instead of IGCSEs then I am very confident that this wouldn’t have happened - I’m sure that a student would have realised. With IGCSEs teachers/students can feel quite isolated because most schools are doing GCSEs. Personally I don’t see why British students should be allowed to take IGCSEs.
5
reply
NotNotBatman
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
This happened to my friend with A level music, they were taught the wrong content until his mum informed the teacher in March.

What would happen in this case though ?
1
reply
MaxDav Mac
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
I am currently doing IGCSEs over GCSEs and there are many benefits. With an IGCSE it is a qualification recognised all over the world yet a GCSE is only recognised in the UK. IGCSEs also still use A*-G so there is less likely to be a screw up with the marking as it is a trusted system-unlike the 9-1 system. As for the teaching of it, whether you are teaching a GCSE or an IGCSE you still have to cover pretty much the same stuff (besides the texts) and it is no harder to learn than a normal GCSE.
This was a colossal mistake by incompetent teachers who embody the arrogant ethos that many private schools do (in the sense that they think they are better than everyone and know everything perfectly, trust me I have personally experienced this), something like this could have easily happened with a normal GCSE so I don't see what the qualification type has to do with it.
I just wanted to let you know what my thoughts are, I don't mean to come across as rude but merely informative
(Original post by Notnek)
I wonder if CIE can do anything? If a student has a bad teacher then that wouldn’t count as special consideration. Does serious incompetence count?

If the school did GCSEs instead of IGCSEs then I am very confident that this wouldn’t have happened - I’m sure that a student would have realised. With IGCSEs teachers/students can feel quite isolated because most schools are doing GCSEs. Personally I don’t see why British students should be allowed to take IGCSEs.
7
reply
Satanicfaeries
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by shooks)
A private school has apologised after teaching its pupils the wrong book for their English Literature IGCSE exam.

Year 11 pupils at Malvern St James Girls' School in Worcestershire had been taught Spies by Michael Frayn for the past two years.

But when they opened their exam papers on Wednesday morning, they discovered no questions about the text - because it was not on the 2019 syllabus.

Read the full Pupils taking English exam taught the wrong book article and join in the discussion by posting a message below.
My cousin goes to this school and she was completely devastated man she studied so hard for literally nothing it’s terrible
0
reply
MaxDav Mac
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
They have applied for special consideration. Personally I think that CIE should make a paper for the texts that the students have studied (since it wasn't the students fault, even though they should have been doing their own checks on the syllabus) and the teachers should be let go and the money for the course from the school be refunded to the parents.
(Original post by NotNotBatman)
This happened to my friend with A level music, they were taught the wrong content until his mum informed the teacher in March.

What would happen in this case though ?
1
reply
Notnek
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by MaxDav Mac)
I am currently doing IGCSEs over GCSEs and there are many benefits. With an IGCSE it is a qualification recognised all over the world yet a GCSE is only recognised in the UK. IGCSEs also still use A*-G so there is less likely to be a screw up with the marking as it is a trusted system-unlike the 9-1 system. As for the teaching of it, whether you are teaching a GCSE or an IGCSE you still have to cover pretty much the same stuff (besides the texts) and it is no harder to learn than a normal GCSE.
This was a colossal mistake by incompetent teachers who embody the arrogant ethos that many private schools do (in the sense that they think they are better than everyone and know everything perfectly, trust me I have personally experienced this), something like this could have easily happened with a normal GCSE so I don't see what the qualification type has to do with it.
I just wanted to let you know what my thoughts are, I don't mean to come across as rude but merely informative
IGCSEs were originally allowed in the UK because they were deemed more “rigorous” than GCSEs. This is not the case anymore and arguably IGCSEs are “easier”. They’re not allowed anymore in state schools and private schools should now be switching back to GCSEs. It doesn’t make any sense to me now to have separate exams for certain students.

If a school had a majority of students who didn’t plan to stay in the UK then it might make sense to choose the IGCSE but GCSEs are also recognised all over the world so it doesn’t really make any difference.

The grades argument doesn’t really hold up. This new system has been going on for a few years now and people are getting more used to it. After a while most job applicants will list their numbered GCSE grades so it might seem a bit strange to still have letter grades.
5
reply
username4310824
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by Satanicfaeries)
My cousin goes to this school and she was completely devastated man she studied so hard for literally nothing it’s terrible
That's awful

Do you know what they actually ended up doing in the exam? Did they just have to finish early or something?
0
reply
sentry_going_up
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by Notnek)
IGCSEs were originally allowed in the UK because they were deemed more “rigorous” than GCSEs. This is not the case anymore and arguably IGCSEs are “easier”. They’re not allowed anymore in state schools and private schools should now be switching back to GCSEs. It doesn’t make any sense to me now to have separate exams for certain students.

If a school had a majority of students who didn’t plan to stay in the UK then it might make sense to choose the IGCSE but GCSEs are also recognised all over the world so it doesn’t really make any difference.

The grades argument doesn’t really hold up. This new system has been going on for a few years now and people are getting more used to it. After a while most job applicants will list their numbered GCSE grades so it might seem a bit strange to still have letter grades.
How are IGCSEs easier?
0
reply
username4606994
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
I had to do IGCSE English and do remember it being easier though that was 5 years ago now
(Original post by Notnek)
I wonder if CIE can do anything? If a student has a bad teacher then that wouldn’t count as special consideration. Does serious incompetence count?

If the school did GCSEs instead of IGCSEs then I am very confident that this wouldn’t have happened - I’m sure that a student would have realised. With IGCSEs teachers/students can feel quite isolated because most schools are doing GCSEs. Personally I don’t see why British students should be allowed to take IGCSEs.
(Original post by sentry_going_up)
How are IGCSEs easier?
0
reply
Notnek
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
I
(Original post by sentry_going_up)
How are IGCSEs easier?
What do you mean by how? By easier I mean that the average student would achieve a higher mark in an average IGCSE exam compared to a 9-1 GCSE exam. Of course grade boundaries would still balance this out.
1
reply
CoolCavy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
£37,000 a year...
5
reply
BlinkyBill
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 years ago
#17
Oh I really feel for these students. That must have been such a stressful experience. I am sure the exam board and school will be doing all they can to support the girls and make sure they're treated fairly. Exams are such a difficult time anyway, it's hard to imagine how this would feel on top of that.

I don't know the circumstances at all, and it's undeniably a serious error; but I wonder what the context is around how this occurred. Having been a teacher myself, I am thinking a lot about the challenges you face as a teacher (which are immense in a way that's hard to explain), and what support/checks were in place to ensure things like this can't happen. I'm inclined to wonder whether a mistake like this can happen without several failings in process, as opposed to one human error.

Just a really difficult situation.
0
reply
jemima0103
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 years ago
#18
I swear this was a storyline on waterloo road
2
reply
esrever
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 years ago
#19
Why does CIE change it's syllabus every few years?
1
reply
username4660704
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#20
Report 2 years ago
#20
Tbh, I think it is partly CIE's fault, I mean they shouldn't have taken this text off the syllabus without making sure that everyone knew it was taken off... someone was gonna make this mistake
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Poll: What factors affect your mental health most right now? Post-lockdown edition

Anxiousness about restrictions easing (33)
5.53%
Uncertainty around my education (70)
11.73%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (67)
11.22%
Lack of purpose or motivation (77)
12.9%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (33)
5.53%
Impact lockdown had on physical health (33)
5.53%
Social worries (incl. loneliness/making friends) (63)
10.55%
Financial worries (39)
6.53%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (24)
4.02%
Exposure to negative news/social media (35)
5.86%
Difficulty accessing real life entertainment (16)
2.68%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (59)
9.88%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (48)
8.04%

Watched Threads

View All