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bethanyrose02
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I'm currently in Year 12 and am hoping to apply to study medicine in October. I have been considering Liverpool University as I love the city, however it is ranked at the bottom of the league table for medicine, should I pay attention to this?
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AzureCeleste
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For medicine, no.
It doesn't matter where you study, everyone graduates with the same degree and same qualifications. Get's the same job in the same company and its considered the same wherever you go
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Democracy
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(Original post by bethanyrose02)
I'm currently in Year 12 and am hoping to apply to study medicine in October. I have been considering Liverpool University as I love the city, however it is ranked at the bottom of the league table for medicine, should I pay attention to this?
No. If there's a problem with a medical school you'll hear about it via the GMC, not the Sunday supplements
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nexttime
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(Original post by bethanyrose02)
I'm currently in Year 12 and am hoping to apply to study medicine in October. I have been considering Liverpool University as I love the city, however it is ranked at the bottom of the league table for medicine, should I pay attention to this?
I definitely wouldn't worry about this.

The league tables for medicine are particularly nonsensical, written by people who have no idea what they are doing. For example, they often use employment rates and weight them highly, but to date everyone who has passed their degree has got an FY1 job, so when they label a university as low employment rate and make them plummet down the table, this is just nonsense. There are ways of looking at what goes into FY1 employment rankings if you want, but they don't do that. Because they don't know what they're doing.

Equally things like entry standards/average UCAS tariff make frankly little sense in a medicine league table, when everyone has AAA+.

Things to pay attention to instead are the course structure and teaching style, which varies dramatically, and the entry requirements and whether you stand a reasonable chance of getting in or not. In addition to the normal stuff like whether you like the city and university, of course.
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ItzNico
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(Original post by bethanyrose02)
I'm currently in Year 12 and am hoping to apply to study medicine in October. I have been considering Liverpool University as I love the city, however it is ranked at the bottom of the league table for medicine, should I pay attention to this?
It doesn’t matter where you go for medicine as you will end up getting a job regardless, as the NHS lacks in doctors, so go wherever you feel you will enjoy and do best in as medicine is a really tough course! I’m hoping to go study medicine from September in QMUL!
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olivia.francesca
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Liverpool university is meant to be a phenomenal university for sciences, and remember it is a Russel group university. I know it has a reputation for having amazing labs and so the course is a lot more practical than at other unis who mostly focus on just teaching the content and you don’t get any real life experience. Also loving the location is a huge factor in picking a uni, remember you have to live there for 4 years so if you love liverpool then it would be a good choice
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MrMedicalStudent
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Im sure Liverpool is amazing for Medicine. And like the others have said, you souldn't worry too much about league tables by the Times or CUG etc due to reasons mentioned allready.

HOWEVER If you'd like to see a thourgh comparison then you should look at data released by the General Medical Council which ranks UK medical schools in various areas. For example in 2018, the GMC found the medical school which produced the "most prepared doctors" for F1 (your first year as a real doctor) was University of East Anglia (Norwich Medical School) and has been 1st in the UK for 3 years in a row whereas Liverpool, unfortunately, diddnt feature and was infact under the mean average in 2018 for preparedness to practise. That doesnt mean Liverpool is a bad place to study medicine. It just means that on average doctors that graduated from this institustion felt they were less well prepared than their peers, such as those from UEA.

Overall though, go to a medical school where you feel most comfortable, but if you want proper data, then you should use it from GMC directly (link below).

http://www.gmc-uk.org/education/25496.asp

Thanks. Med Love.
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GANFYD
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(Original post by MrMedicalStudent)
Im sure Liverpool is amazing for Medicine. And like the others have said, you souldn't worry too much about league tables by the Times or CUG etc due to reasons mentioned allready.

HOWEVER If you'd like to see a thourgh comparison then you should look at data released by the General Medical Council which ranks UK medical schools in various areas. For example in 2018, the GMC found the medical school which produced the "most prepared doctors" for F1 (your first year as a real doctor) was University of East Anglia (Norwich Medical School) and has been 1st in the UK for 3 years in a row whereas Liverpool, unfortunately, diddnt feature and was infact under the mean average in 2018 for preparedness to practise. That doesnt mean Liverpool is a bad place to study medicine. It just means that on average doctors that graduated from this institustion felt they were less well prepared than their peers, such as those from UEA.

Overall though, go to a medical school where you feel most comfortable, but if you want proper data, then you should use it from GMC directly (link below).

http://www.gmc-uk.org/education/25496.asp

Thanks. Med Love.
It doesn't say that Liverpool graduates felt less prepared, that cannot be extrapolated from that data. It says fewer Liverpool graduates felt prepared, but of those who were, who is to say whether they felt more or less prepared than those who graduated from UEA? And that all of those who felt they were not really ready weren't just missing the mark and those from UEA were miles off? The data should not be used to infer things beyond the specific question it has been designed to answer.
More Liverpool graduates felt prepared for F1 than graduates from Barts, Cambridge and Imperial.
I would say that if a med school can get 60% of its graduates to feel confident to move on, then the training is there for them all to do it and there are likely other factors at work here.
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APPLICANT2016
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I suspect the negative feedbacks were from final years still doing the PBL course. Liverpool have completely revamped the course and it is now integrated. Some excellent facilities. - harc centre for anatomy, a clinical skills centre and so on. Some great hospitals. 7 weeks if placements in year 2. And Liverpool are throwing a LOT of money on the medical school and on additional facilities and teaching staff.

Is it the best med school? Hell no.
Is it the worst? Hell no.
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black tea
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(Original post by olivia.francesca)
Liverpool university is meant to be a phenomenal university for sciences, and remember it is a Russel group university. I know it has a reputation for having amazing labs and so the course is a lot more practical than at other unis who mostly focus on just teaching the content and you don’t get any real life experience. Also loving the location is a huge factor in picking a uni, remember you have to live there for 4 years so if you love liverpool then it would be a good choice
But OP is looking to apply to medicine, not science. And medicine is not a 4 year degree- it's at least 5.
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olivia.francesca
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Damn I wasn’t being that precise I was just telling op that it’s a good uni. I used science as an umbrella term and why does it matter exactly how many years the course lasts my point about location still stands
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black tea
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(Original post by olivia.francesca)
Damn I wasn’t being that precise I was just telling op that it’s a good uni. I used science as an umbrella term and why does it matter exactly how many years the course lasts my point about location still stands
Just pointing out that none of that is relevant to the course OP wants to do, and whether it's a good uni or not is also completely irrelevant for medicine. But yeah, totally agree about location being a huge factor in picking a uni.
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Democracy
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Medical degrees don't come under the science umbrella though and medical students spend minimal time in the lab - just fyi.
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olivia.francesca
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[QUOTE=Democracy;83274148]Medical degrees don't come under the science umbrella though and medical students spend minimal time in the lab - just fyi.[/
(Original post by Democracy)
Medical degrees don't come under the science umbrella though and medical students spend minimal time in the lab - just fyi.
At Liverpool uni, most of the third year is practical research where you use the labs or do placement in one of Liverpool’s hospitals to carry out a research project
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Democracy
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Once again, this isn't how it works for medical students and since this is the Medicine forum, that's what we're trying to provide the OP with information about - and yes, we do like to be quite "precise" on here

(Original post by olivia.francesca)
At Liverpool uni, most of the third year is practical research where you use the labs or do placement in one of Liverpool’s hospitals to carry out a research project
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olivia.francesca
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The website for the university of Liverpool says medical students will do multiple placements across years 2-5 ? For practical application of knowledge?
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Democracy
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Clinical placements are different to carrying out a research project. Anyway it's fine, the OP should definitely go to Liverpool if she think she'd be happy there

(Original post by olivia.francesca)
The website for the university of Liverpool says medical students will do multiple placements across years 2-5 ? For practical application of knowledge?
(Original post by olivia.francesca)
At Liverpool uni, most of the third year is practical research where you use the labs or do placement in one of Liverpool’s hospitals to carry out a research project
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nexttime
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(Original post by olivia.francesca)
The website for the university of Liverpool says medical students will do multiple placements across years 2-5 ? For practical application of knowledge?
In a hospital, not a lab!
(Original post by MrMedicalStudent)
Im sure Liverpool is amazing for Medicine. And like the others have said, you souldn't worry too much about league tables by the Times or CUG etc due to reasons mentioned allready.

HOWEVER If you'd like to see a thourgh comparison then you should look at data released by the General Medical Council which ranks UK medical schools in various areas. For example in 2018, the GMC found the medical school which produced the "most prepared doctors" for F1 (your first year as a real doctor) was University of East Anglia (Norwich Medical School) and has been 1st in the UK for 3 years in a row whereas Liverpool, unfortunately, diddnt feature and was infact under the mean average in 2018 for preparedness to practise. That doesnt mean Liverpool is a bad place to study medicine. It just means that on average doctors that graduated from this institustion felt they were less well prepared than their peers, such as those from UEA.

Overall though, go to a medical school where you feel most comfortable, but if you want proper data, then you should use it from GMC directly (link below).

http://www.gmc-uk.org/education/25496.asp

Thanks. Med Love.
I think that link requires you to log in? Do you mean the data found via this link?

Also, that's not exactly what the GMC found is it? They found that UEA students reported themselves to be most prepared - a big difference! Not entirely not useful though.

I do agree that this kind of data actually has some applicability though, whereas league tables generally do not.
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APPLICANT2016
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(Original post by black tea)
But OP is looking to apply to medicine, not science. And medicine is not a 4 year degree- it's at least 5.
Anatomy, biochemistry, pharmacology, microbiology’s, physiology- all science.

Grad med is 4 yrs
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black tea
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(Original post by APPLICANT2016)
Anatomy, biochemistry, pharmacology, microbiology’s, physiology- all science.

Grad med is 4 yrs
OP is in year 12 and is applying or medicine, not any of those degrees.
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