Is it possible to study medicine in the US if i am from the uk Watch

Bahamas
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Becoming a doctor in the uk is not very appealing to me so does anyone have any advice on how to go to the US and what hospitals there to look out for?
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Democracy
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(Original post by Bahamas)
Becoming a doctor in the uk is not very appealing to me so does anyone have any advice on how to go to the US and what hospitals there to look out for?
This question gets asked approx once a week. Do a search.

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wik...ine_in_the_USA
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Nottie
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(Original post by Bahamas)
Becoming a doctor in the uk is not very appealing to me so does anyone have any advice on how to go to the US and what hospitals there to look out for?
Why is UK not very appealing to you? It's certainly cheaper and quicker to attend med school here.
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mpaprika
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don't you need a college degree from the US first (4 years) and then med school (extra 4? I think, I only know this from greys anatomy) and then extra training on top of that so it will take longer
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Bahamas
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My mum works as a nurse in the hospital and she complains all the time about the lack of standard of care there is and how the NHS is pretty much in shambles. The US had more opportunities and isn't the time spent studying medicine the same anyway?
(Original post by Nottie)
Why is UK not very appealing to you? It's certainly cheaper and quicker to attend med school here.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Bahamas)
My mum works as a nurse in the hospital and she complains all the time about the lack of standard of care there is and how the NHS is pretty much in shambles. The US had more opportunities and isn't the time spent studying medicine the same anyway?
No. In the US you would need to do a 4 year standard bachelors degree first (taking pre-med courses), and then go to medical school for 4 years. So 8 years of university. In the UK it's 5 years. You don't need 2 degrees & study medicine straight away, as an undergrad.

Also, 8 years of university in the US will cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. You will not be able to get a UK/US student loan and will have to pay the fees (possibly up to $80,000 a year) up front for 8 years. Whereas in the UK, you are entitled to a UK student loan that covers all the fees, and fees are capped at £9250 a year.
Last edited by LeapingLucy; 1 month ago
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Bahamas
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After uni in the UK would I be able to apply for work in the US?
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Bahamas)
After uni in the UK would I be able to apply for work in the US?
It's not impossible, but immigration and becoming qualified to practise in another country are extremely difficult processes, and nothing is guaranteed.

It's not as simple as just applying for work in the US - getting permission to work there is extremely difficult.
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Democracy
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
No. In the US you would need to do a 4 year standard bachelors degree first (taking pre-med courses), and then go to medical school for 4 years. So 8 years of university. In the UK it's 5 years. You don't need 2 degrees & study medicine straight away, as an undergrad.

Also, 8 years of university in the US will cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. You will not be able to get a UK/US student loan and will have to pay the fees (possibly up to $80,000 a year) up front for 8 years. Whereas in the UK, you are entitled to a UK student loan that covers all the fees, and fees are capped at £9250 a year.
It still adds up - although yeah, it's certainly more doable than the US.

(Original post by Bahamas)
After uni in the UK would I be able to apply for work in the US?
If you pass their licensing exams and jump through all the other hoops. That doesn't mean you'll get to work in the specialty you want or in the region you envisage however.

What is it that you think you'll get in the US that you can't get here?
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Bahamas
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Honestly better opportunities
(Original post by Democracy)
It still adds up - although yeah, it's certainly more doable than the US.



If you pass their licensing exams and jump through all the other hoops. That doesn't mean you'll get to work in the specialty you want or in the region you envisage however.

What is it that you think you'll get in the US that you can't get here?
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Democracy
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(Original post by Bahamas)
Honestly better opportunities
Like what?
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Bahamas)
Honestly better opportunities
Can you define what you think these opportunities are? It sounds like a classic case of thinking the grass is greener on the other side.
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Sharmarko
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Why the hell would you want to work in America?


I know the NHS isn't great, but why America when countries like Australia, Canada and the Scandinavian exist?

If you want to work in America for the money, then just do Dentistry and save yourself 3 years of work.
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dontevenknow2
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Australia has the worst pay in health care sector, Canada is highly expensive however Scandinavia is a good option

(Original post by Sharmarko)
Why the hell would you want to work in America?


I know the NHS isn't great, but why America when countries like Australia, Canada and the Scandinavian exist?

If you want to work in America for the money, then just do Dentistry and save yourself 3 years of work.
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Sharmarko
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(Original post by dontevenknow2)
Australia has the worst pay in health care sector, Canada is highly expensive however Scandinavia is a good option
I want to be a doctor; I've spoken to many F1 Doctors in training and they all said Australia will pay you what you are worth, which is more than what the UK does. I know Canada is similar.

When you say worst pay in the health care sector, is that including nurses, pharmacists etc, or do you mean just for doctors? I'm assuming not doctors, who are paid well there.
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dontevenknow2
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For doctors if you conver it to a UK doctor the salary is more. however taxes are also much higher there and the cost of studying in australia is very high (for medicine)
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ChangeOurWorld
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(Original post by Bahamas)
After uni in the UK would I be able to apply for work in the US?
Quite possibly, especially as doctors are in demand everywhere. BUT it is unlikley you would be able to as a newly qualified Doctors. Your chances would be much higher if you built up experience and expertise in a specific medical field before being offered a job in the US.
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Bahamas
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What about being a doctor in Scandinavia?
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mpaprika
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You have to think of it this way: do you want to study medicine because you want to be a doctor or do you want to study medicine to earn a lot of money ''quickly'' and ''easily''?
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Nottie
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(Original post by ChangeOurWorld)
Quite possibly, especially as doctors are in demand everywhere. BUT it is unlikley you would be able to as a newly qualified Doctors. Your chances would be much higher if you built up experience and expertise in a specific medical field before being offered a job in the US.
do you talk from personal experience or just wanted to contribute something? It is MUCH better to start the application process while you are still in med school as you need to pass all USMLE exams. Also, US doesn't really accept UK postgrad qualifications so its best to apply as early as possible so that you don't lose years.
(Original post by Bahamas)
What about being a doctor in Scandinavia?
Why Scandinavia? You will need to learn another language to a fluent level. And how do you know their healthcare system is better than NHS?

I'll save you some time and say France and Belgium are extremely competitive and medicine is taught in French/Dutch only. I don't think Germany offers English taught courses too.
Eastern Europe has medicine in English, but it's very expensive and the style isn't really that great tbh.

You may try the Netherlands, but they also require Dutch language proficiency by 4th year and the exam is very very hard.
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