Cassio in Othello - a level english literature

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fatcatslol
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Othello - Cassio may be a 'proper man' but he is also an honest fool whose weakness plays no small part in the tragic death of Desdemona
I have mentioned when:
- he gives into gettting drunk due to his hubris and honour and he even denies not being drunk (i dont know to to link to desdemona)
- despite being an "arithmetician " he lacks common sense and falls for Iagos plans in talking to desdemona about being reinstated
- He doesn't have the guts to approach Othello directly but makes Desdemona beg to reinstate him, hes a coward
- he flirts with desdemona which makes her look like a "strumpet"

im really struggling on this help!!! i dont know how to elaborate on these ideas either.
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mattme1963
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'Mere prattle without practice', 'a Florentine'
Yet, Cassio survives the play, unlike Emilia, Desdemona, Othello.
Not sure if he is 'weak' but it's all subjective I guess. I view him as an honourable tragic victim, perhaps even more so than Othello/Desdemona.
He has a close, non-sexual relationship with Desdemona, suggesting his values towards women?
Does he flirt with Desdemona, making her look like a 'strumpet'? Or does Iago make it seem that he is flirting with Desdemona?
I think he is a tragic victim, manipulated by Iago in a similar way to Othello, but maybe this is only because Shakespeare doesn't delve into Cassio as a character in a way that I feel that he should. Even Emilia, the 'honest whore', gets a whole scene (and song!) in which her character, and nature, is explored.
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fatcatslol
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thank you so much!!

how could i link these to desdemona's death
(Original post by mattme1963)
'Mere prattle without practice', 'a Florentine'
Yet, Cassio survives the play, unlike Emilia, Desdemona, Othello.
Not sure if he is 'weak' but it's all subjective I guess. I view him as an honourable tragic victim, perhaps even more so than Othello/Desdemona.
He has a close, non-sexual relationship with Desdemona, suggesting his values towards women?
Does he flirt with Desdemona, making her look like a 'strumpet'? Or does Iago make it seem that he is flirting with Desdemona?
I think he is a tragic victim, manipulated by Iago in a similar way to Othello, but maybe this is only because Shakespeare doesn't delve into Cassio as a character in a way that I feel that he should. Even Emilia, the 'honest whore', gets a whole scene (and song!) in which her character, and nature, is explored.
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mattme1963
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Tricky question, I would have to argue against and pin all blame on Othello's weakness and Iago's manipulation (for Desdemona's death)

Perhaps, as you have mentioned, Cassio is naive?
Could link to the fact that he is an 'outsider', a 'Florentine', like Othello. An interesting comparison to be had here.

Definitely comment on the motif of the handkerchief, the futile symbol that links Cassio and Desdemona.
I'd find it hard to agree with the question but I guess this is only because I am a confessed Cassio-sympathiser.
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