History or Geography for A level Watch

moumisayed
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I want to get into the top russell group or ivy leagues for economics. I'm considering both the US and UK. I want to take Maths, Economics, Eng Lit, History/Geography.

Which one of History and Geography should I take?

I wanted to take BS but it's a soft subject so no i guess.
What do you guys recommend?

And my board is cambridge btw
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Jεss Lγnη
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Just some context: I've chosen to do Geography at a level but I'm not thinking about taking history

I think since you're doing economics maybe do history if you want a variety because geography also covers some topics to do with economics in the course but if you want to make your life easier since you're doing 4 maybe take geography for the same reason. It could also mean that by learning about economics in more depth it will improve your geography.

But it also depends on which one you like more... because if you don't like the one you've chosen then you won't enjoy it.
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Jεss Lγnη
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also is there a particular course that you're interested in?
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moumisayed
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Kind of worried about taking history as there is a lot of memorizing and remembering. Thats what i heard tho. I kind of like geography, but does it have the same reputation as history?
(Original post by Jεss Lγnη)
Just some context: I've chosen to do Geography at a level but I'm not thinking about taking history

I think since you're doing economics maybe do history if you want a variety because geography also covers some topics to do with economics in the course but if you want to make your life easier since you're doing 4 maybe take geography for the same reason. It could also mean that by learning about economics in more depth it will improve your geography.

But it also depends on which one you like more... because if you don't like the one you've chosen then you won't enjoy it.
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moumisayed
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Yeah, economics. It's stated above.
(Original post by Jεss Lγnη)
also is there a particular course that you're interested in?
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Jεss Lγnη
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I mean they're both humanities but I feel that history is better for someone interested in politics whereas you're more interested in economics. If you like geography more then go for it but there is also a lot of content for geography too so I would say that the workload is fairly even. What you could do is ask whether you would be allowed to change your subjects in year 12 because I know our school lets you if your don't like a subject or if it just isn't what you expected. That way you could start doing one and then move to another if you don't like that subject. I would also advise checking what the universities you're interested in say would be good subjects for economics.

But don't just go by what I'm saying ask your subject teachers too and see what they say.
(Original post by moumisayed)
Kind of worried about taking history as there is a lot of memorizing and remembering. Thats what i heard tho. I kind of like geography, but does it have the same reputation as history?
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Jεss Lγnη
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Sorry I missed that...
(Original post by moumisayed)
Yeah, economics. It's stated above.
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artful_lounger
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Either is fine, but there's not much benefit to taking four A-levels where two aren't maths and further maths. You aren't going to "score extra points" for taking an additional subject, and run the risk of stretching yourself too thin and not achieving the high grades required from three A-levels. If you are required to start with four then drop one in year 12 by your school then there's not too much to be done.

However in either case, A-level Further Maths would be much better than any of those humanities subjects (English lit, History, or Geography). More than 80% of successful applicants to LSE single honours economics have further maths, and it's very common for applicants to Cambridge, UCL and Warwick. I'd note for PPE at Oxford, they consider A-level History "helpful" though. Economics, history, maths, and further maths is a pretty common combination for would-be economics applicants, although many universities are also happy to accept applicants with just double maths and another subject (often economics).
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moumisayed
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I don't want the pain of further maths. The Cambridge Maths contents are pain enough.
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Either is fine, but there's not much benefit to taking four A-levels where two aren't maths and further maths. You aren't going to "score extra points" for taking an additional subject, and run the risk of stretching yourself too thin and not achieving the high grades required from three A-levels. If you are required to start with four then drop one in year 12 by your school then there's not too much to be done.

However in either case, A-level Further Maths would be much better than any of those humanities subjects (English lit, History, or Geography). More than 80% of successful applicants to LSE single honours economics have further maths, and it's very common for applicants to Cambridge, UCL and Warwick. I'd note for PPE at Oxford, they consider A-level History "helpful" though. Economics, history, maths, and further maths is a pretty common combination for would-be economics applicants, although many universities are also happy to accept applicants with just double maths and another subject (often economics).
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by moumisayed)
I don't want the pain of further maths. The Cambridge Maths contents are pain enough.
You can safely rule out LSE then, and quite possibly Cambridge and Warwick.

Also you realise in any economics degree you are going to be doing maths beyond A-level, including further maths content - and in US univeristies for top economics programmes (and sometimes available as options in UK programmes which are very mathematical, e.g. LSE, Warwick, UCL) content which is shared with mathematics degree programmes (real analysis and abstract linear algebra)?

I would suggest you reflect on whether economics is a good choice for a degree aim if you don't feel able to do FM, and don't enjoy maths now, because at university level economics is necessarily mathematical, as with physics or engineering or other numerate degrees. It's three years of using maths (e.g. calculus) to solve economic problems. It's not "just" statistics, and it's certainly not essay based for the majority of "top" courses you want to aim for.
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