What is the UK equivalent of Georgetown University? Watch

Firstcupoftea
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Excuse my ignorance. I am not living in the UK .
I am planning to get a Phd in law, but not sure where to go. Rankings are confusing to me and I didn't know which one to count on. Georgetown is known in the U.S. for being a highly selective, prestigious institution that constantly places high ranks in almost every aspect. It definitely has the"the wow factor". With that being said, it's not Harvard or Yale. What is its equivalent in the UK?
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Firstcupoftea)
Excuse my ignorance. I am not living in the UK .
I am planning to get a Phd in law, but not sure where to go. Rankings are confusing to me and I didn't know which one to count on. Georgetown is known in the U.S. for being a highly selective, prestigious institution that constantly places high ranks in almost every aspect. It definitely has the"the wow factor". With that being said, it's not Harvard or Yale. What is its equivalent in the UK?
This is very difficult to answer as most of the best places for Law are old established universities. I suppose looking at your criteria Bath, York,. Warwick, Exeter and Lancaster fit your bill but Bath I believe doesn't offer Law.
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ageshallnot
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LSE?
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ltsmith
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None because we don't have any prestigious private universities. All of our prestigious universities are public.
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artful_lounger
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When you say "a PhD in Law", what area specifically are you looking to get it in? There probably isn't really a general equivalent because it doesn't really...make sense for there to be one. A university that might be excellent in one area of legal research and academia may be highly deficient in another. Given the extremely specialised nature of the PhD, generic metrics aren't relevant - those don't tell you if the world leader in research in a given field is working there.

Generally, all universities in the UK are research universities, and law "schools" lecturers in the UK tend to research first, teach second. So, any "highly ranked" law course provider will likely have some research ongoing that is of fairly notable standard and might be worth considering (e.g. Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Durham). For legal philosophy/jurisprudence Oxford is, as I understand, the world leader - they're also considered one of the, if not the, strongest law departments in the country as far as undergrad studies go (and have a very prestigious masters course, the BCL). As I understand Cambridge has a major international law research centre, and a lot of land/property law stuff (in the department of land economy).

Durham or UCL are probably the "next step down" for undergraduate law I guess from Oxbridge/LSE, but that's as above not really relevant to the quality of a PhD programme in a particular area of research. If you wanted to research e.g. Islamic law then SOAS would probably be a strong option for example, despite being considered rather average by undergrad generic metrics.
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Firstcupoftea
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
This is very difficult to answer as most of the best places for Law are old established universities. I suppose looking at your criteria Bath, York,. Warwick, Exeter and Lancaster fit your bill but Bath I believe doesn't offer Law.
Thank you.
How do you see these universities compared to UCL, Manchester, Edinburgh, Leeds?
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by Firstcupoftea)
Excuse my ignorance. I am not living in the UK .
I am planning to get a Phd in law, but not sure where to go. Rankings are confusing to me and I didn't know which one to count on. Georgetown is known in the U.S. for being a highly selective, prestigious institution that constantly places high ranks in almost every aspect. It definitely has the"the wow factor". With that being said, it's not Harvard or Yale. What is its equivalent in the UK?
definitely LSE. 100% considering the types of students you get at both unis.
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Firstcupoftea
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(Original post by ageshallnot)
LSE?
LSE is highly prestigious, from reading here in the forums, I got the sense that it is viewed as an equivalent to Columbia Uni. I would take an offer from LSE without even thinking but I don't know if it is within reach.
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Firstcupoftea
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
When you say "a PhD in Law", what area specifically are you looking to get it in? There probably isn't really a general equivalent because it doesn't really...make sense for there to be one. A university that might be excellent in one area of legal research and academia may be highly deficient in another. Given the extremely specialised nature of the PhD, generic metrics aren't relevant - those don't tell you if the world leader in research in a given field is working there.

Generally, all universities in the UK are research universities, and law "schools" lecturers in the UK tend to research first, teach second. So, any "highly ranked" law course provider will likely have some research ongoing that is of fairly notable standard and might be worth considering (e.g. Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Durham). For legal philosophy/jurisprudence Oxford is, as I understand, the world leader - they're also considered one of the, if not the, strongest law departments in the country as far as undergrad studies go (and have a very prestigious masters course, the BCL). As I understand Cambridge has a major international law research centre, and a lot of land/property law stuff (in the department of land economy).

Durham or UCL are probably the "next step down" for undergraduate law I guess from Oxbridge/LSE, but that's as above not really relevant to the quality of a PhD programme in a particular area of research. If you wanted to research e.g. Islamic law then SOAS would probably be a strong option for example, despite being considered rather average by undergrad generic metrics.
I am interested in Intellectual Property law and International Business law. Do employers care about these details? I assume that they care about the performance of the department as a whole?
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swanseajack1
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Of similar standard for most things but I dont know about law. The difference is they tend to be in smaller cities whereas the others are in bigger cities. Edinburgh is based on Scottish law which is different to the others. The newer universities were built in the 1960s whereas the ones you mention go back much further.
(Original post by Firstcupoftea)
Thank you.
How do you see these universities compared to UCL, Manchester, Edinburgh, Leeds?
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by Firstcupoftea)
I am interested in Intellectual Property law and International Business law.
Edinburgh, Manchester, Oxford for Intellectual Property Law.
Kings College London (KCL), Manchester for International Business Law.
General all round 'good' UK Law Schools in no particular order - LSE, KCL, UCL, Durham, Bristol, Manchester, Edinburgh.

Employers are not impressed by PhDs. They are more impressed by a very good LLB or LLM - and relevant work experience.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
Edinburgh, Manchester, Oxford for Intellectual Property Law.
Kings College London (KCL), Manchester for International Business Law.
General all round 'good' UK Law Schools in no particular order - LSE, KCL, UCL, Durham, Bristol, Manchester, Edinburgh.

Employers are not impressed by PhDs. They are more impressed by a very good LLB or LLM - and relevant work experience.
Not really helpful to give these "insights". OP could very well turn down City or QMUL or Southampton for "int'l business law" just because they are not in your arbitrary categories -- nor is it clear if your research is in these areas, so you'd even be expected to know the leading schools.
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Not really helpful to give these "insights". OP could very well turn down City or QMUL or Southampton for "int'l business law" just because they are not in your arbitrary categories -- nor is it clear if your research is in these areas, so you'd even be expected to know the leading schools.
If the OP doesn't exercise due diligence and relies solely on any of the advice given on a random website then frankly they deserve everything they get. And, just for the record, I'm an academic at a leading UK University.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
If the OP doesn't exercise due diligence and relies solely on any of the advice given on a random website then frankly they deserve everything they get. And, just for the record, I'm an academic at a leading UK University.
Do you research international business law?
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Do you research international business law?
The Universities I have mentioned offer LLM in those fields, therefore they will have that staff expertise.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
The Universities I have mentioned offer LLM in those fields, therefore they will have that staff expertise.
You might know the people in your field well and know where they are located, but the listing you have given arbitrary and almost random.
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J-SP
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(Original post by Firstcupoftea)
I am interested in Intellectual Property law and International Business law. Do employers care about these details? I assume that they care about the performance of the department as a whole?
The only employers who will care about an LLM or PhD in law will be academic institutions.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by J-SP)
The only employers who will care about an LLM or PhD in law will be academic institutions.
Have seen the odd paralegal place ask for LPC or LLM if not. Guess to filter out a bunch of candidates rather easily.
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J-SP
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Have seen the odd paralegal place ask for LPC or LLM if not. Guess to filter out a bunch of candidates rather easily.
That’s not really caring about the LLM as such, more about them wanting someone with a higher level of analytical ability, particularly to limit application numbers. I have seen it occasionally where they state having done particular modules/specialisms can be helpful in recruitment processes though.
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