Pupils stopped from doing A-Level exams because they did badly in their mocks Watch

StrawberryDreams
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-48339107

Students who did badly in their February mock A-Levels at UCL Academy were withdrawn from their A-Level exams this summer at the last moment, reports say. They have said that this was also done via email over Easter, instead of a face-to-face meeting.

They're now worried about University applications, with some students paying £450 per exam to sit them externally, or looking to defer their place. Revision worries, stress and anxiety has also hit hard.

The academy said "any student at risk of not passing was identified early in the school year. This led to meetings with parents and teachers to flag the concern and agree a plan of support and action. Targets were agreed and action necessary to fulfill them were put in place".

This counteracts what the students themselves and the Association of School and College Leaders have said happened.

What do you think about how they were withdrawn from their exams?
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Guru Jason
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I'd be interested to see their pass rates. Can't see any other reason to withdraw so many people unless it's to protect it. Pretty scummy if you ask me.
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Andrew97
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I doubt it just based on mock results, If so that would be ridiculous.
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Neilos
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Curious... I'd expect this sort of thing to happen in those highly selective places where their position in league tables and average grade rankings (or whatever they have) come ahead of everything.

But fancy name and UCL link aside, this one is an entirely average school with unremarkable results.

(Results Info)
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sarunthan87
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(Original post by Andrew97)
I doubt it just based on mock results, If so that would be ridiculous.
Sadly it’s true - and it isn’t the first school. Look up Dartford Grammar and St Olave’s who excluded pupils because of bad mock grades, it’s just to protect reputation and their stats. The school should be investigated since they’ve broken the law by doing this.
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MinaBee
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Another school caring more about their reputation than their students.
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PhoenixFortune
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When I was at school (granted that was many years ago), mock exams were never taken seriously and were seen to mean very little, so grades were always vastly different to real exam performance. The attitude towards mocks may have changed nowadays, but it's most likely a failing of the school for not preparing their pupils properly (and not making them aware of the consequences of bad performance).
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ChangeOurWorld
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When I was in sixth form I badly flunked my mocks. I was struggling with the realsiation I was no longer the smartest person in the class and this knocked my confidence badly so I didn't feel like I could do any of the work. I really struggle to maintain revision alongside regular classes and homework so i didn't do much revision for the mocks. I ended up with really bad grades in these and yet managed to get some of the best marks in my cohort in my final exams. If my school had withdrawn me from my A Levels because of poor progress half way through the year I would not have been able to sit them and would never have attended the LSE for undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

This is horrendous and injust for the students and the schools should be ashamed of themselves.
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drriversong
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my first AS level english mock: D
I ended up getting 94% in my AS that same year. Mocks mean nout
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forgotten_one
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Feels like the school just wants to be high up in the school rankings.
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GreenCub
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Quite a bit can change in the few months between February mocks and the actual A level exams. There seems to be no reason for the academy to do this except eliminating low-scoring students so they can boost their league table rankings.

It would be useful to get some statistics on the proportion of students who passed out of the ones the academy thought was going to fail.
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