What does this mean exactly? Watch

Anonymous #1
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I work in a care home and a (male) manager said to a resident I was taking out 'make sure you look after him' and a female staff was smiling at him when he said it?
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sinfonietta
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#2
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There is no deep or hidden meaning here.
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Anonymous #1
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He said it to the resident as if to say look after the staff member
(Original post by sinfonietta)
There is no deep or hidden meaning here.
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sinfonietta
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(Original post by Anonymous)
He said it to the resident as if to say look after the staff member
Yes, I got that. There's no hidden meaning there. People say things like that to the elderly, children, less abled, etc to make them feel in control.
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Anonymous #1
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What about of a staff member says about another staff member 'he doesn't even know what day it is?'?
(Original post by sinfonietta)
Yes, I got that. There's no hidden meaning there. People say things like that to the elderly, children, less abled, etc to make them feel in control.
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sinfonietta
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(Original post by Anonymous)
What about of a staff member says about another staff member 'he doesn't even know what day it is?'?
Sounds like a joke. Don't try to read into every little thing someone says.
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Notoriety
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You kids have too much time on your hands; to analyse in great detail every human interaction, till you've formed a full catalogue of your life's work.

You're not that important. Do your job, get home, have ya tea, and get to kip. Bright and early for tomoz.
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ChrisMarin
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Sounds like a joke to me.
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katf
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(Original post by sinfonietta)
Yes, I got that. There's no hidden meaning there. People say things like that to the elderly, children, less abled, etc to make them feel in control.
Please use the term disabled, not less abled. The latter is very patronising. Disabled is not a bad word and actually most disabled people identify with it. It tends to be abled people who try to find an alternative to disabled. Most of the time it's patronising, twee and treats us like we're about 5.

Those sorts of comments to disabled people are also very patronising and usually come off as offensive as it's treating us like we're children.
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sinfonietta
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(Original post by katf)
Please use the term disabled, not less abled. The latter is very patronising. Disabled is not a bad word and actually most disabled people identify with it. It tends to be abled people who try to find an alternative to disabled. Most of the time it's patronising, twee and treats us like we're about 5.

Those sorts of comments to disabled people are also very patronising and usually come off as offensive as it's treating us like we're children.
I used a broader term because I wasn't referring exclusively to disabled persons.
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katf
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(Original post by sinfonietta)
I used a broader term because I wasn't referring exclusively to disabled persons.
But the inference was that you were referring to disabled people. If you're not, don't lump us in with abled people. Disability refers to a long term condition that has a substantial and long term effect on your ability to do every day activities.
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username2923348
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(Original post by katf)
Please use the term disabled, not less abled. The latter is very patronising. Disabled is not a bad word and actually most disabled people identify with it. It tends to be abled people who try to find an alternative to disabled. Most of the time it's patronising, twee and treats us like we're about 5.

Those sorts of comments to disabled people are also very patronising and usually come off as offensive as it's treating us like we're children.
Mate, less able is totally fine. Stop finding things to be offended over.

If someone was partially death they are "less able" to hear, it's just a different way of phrasing.
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katf
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(Original post by TheRealSquiddy)
Mate, less able is totally fine. Stop finding things to be offended over.

If someone was partially death they are "less able" to hear, it's just a different way of phrasing.
A lot of able bodied people are trying to find an alternative to the word disabled. And not bothering to consult actual disabled people on whether we want a different word. As an actual disabled person, less able is not fine. It's a very negative phrasing and isn't used by disabled people to refer to ourselves.
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username2923348
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(Original post by katf)
A lot of able bodied people are trying to find an alternative to the word disabled. And not bothering to consult actual disabled people on whether we want a different word. As an actual disabled person, less able is not fine. It's a very negative phrasing and isn't used by disabled people to refer to ourselves.
Actually my mother who was deaf used it to refer to herself, she hated the word disabled but accepted she was less abled than others. Stop speaking for everyone.
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katf
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(Original post by TheRealSquiddy)
Actually my mother who was deaf used it to refer to herself, she hated the word disabled but accepted she was less abled than others. Stop speaking for everyone.
And I'm disabled and absolutely hate the term less abled. Almost as much as handicapable, which is possibly the most patronising word in existence. I object to abled people, including carers, speaking for disabled people.

I've never met a disabled person who refers to themselves as less abled. I have however met a lot of abled people who use that term. The vast majority of us use the term disabled.

Unless YOU are disabled, you have absolutely no say in the vocabulary that we use. And that means you, not your mum, partner or second cousin twice removed.
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username2923348
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(Original post by katf)
And I'm disabled and absolutely hate the term less abled. Almost as much as handicapable, which is possibly the most patronising word in existence. I object to abled people, including carers, speaking for disabled people.

I've never met a disabled person who refers to themselves as less abled. I have however met a lot of abled people who use that term. The vast majority of us use the term disabled.

Unless YOU are disabled, you have absolutely no say in the vocabulary that we use. And that means you, not your mum, partner or second cousin twice removed.
Is now the time to mention I'm partially deaf too? Seriously, you are trying to make a mountain out of a molehill, you're using disability as a scapegoat to be offended.

I personally couldn't care less what people say about me, less abled, disabled or deaf, Because I am technically all three.
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