A2 Chemistry Transition metals and ionization energy Multiple Choice Question Watch

Leah.J
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I think I know why it's C, I'm not sure tho. Can someone explain why it's C ?
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Kian Stevens
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Because it takes seven successive ionisations of C before a significant 'jump' in energy occurs, i.e. from \approx 11500 kJ mol-1 to \approx 19000 kJ mol-1

If you consider how C would ionise, it'd firstly lose its two s-subshell electrons (the first two ionisation energies), and then it'd lose its five d-subshell electrons (the five ionisation energies after that)
When the d-subshell electrons are ionised, electrons are then ionised from the p-subshell, which is significantly closer to the nucleus and experiences less shielding, and so more energy is required to remove electrons from it

Compare this to the other three choices...
A is representative of a group 1 metal
B is representative of a group 2 metal
D is representative of some ionisations which haven't started with the first
Last edited by Kian Stevens; 4 months ago
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