Why is the NHS reluctant to prescribe sleeping tablets but...? Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
Privately you can get prescription sleeping tablets very easily and as a routine prescription?I know they can be dangerous but if someone takes small doses and not too often it works wonders.
0
reply
MidgetFever
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
Because diagnosis and treatment from the NHS is free, and therefore more widely used. So it's more likely that they'll be abused or used dangerously.

Private healthcare is costly and so, with less people using it, the likelihood of someone abusing it is lower, especially when private healthcare can be expensive.
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
That wasn't my experience at all - my GP was more than happy to give me sleeping pills and even suggested I should take them. They are addictive though and the advice I was given is that you have to use your prescription to basically get your sleep back into a normal pattern, then wean yourself off them. So I got a prescription for 14, told to take 1 a day for 5 days, then 1 every 2 days for 10 days, then 1 every 3 days for 12 days and they worked wonders for me.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#4
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#4
Privately they prescribe like 30.Xanax is given out incredibly easily also (you can't get Xanax on NHS) like 30 given out at one time and can be prescribed routinely with no questions asked.
(Original post by Anonymous)
That wasn't my experience at all - my GP was more than happy to give me sleeping pills and even suggested I should take them. They are addictive though and the advice I was given is that you have to use your prescription to basically get your sleep back into a normal pattern, then wean yourself off them. So I got a prescription for 14, told to take 1 a day for 5 days, then 1 every 2 days for 10 days, then 1 every 3 days for 12 days and they worked wonders for me.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#5
What did they prescribe you?
(Original post by Anonymous)
That wasn't my experience at all - my GP was more than happy to give me sleeping pills and even suggested I should take them. They are addictive though and the advice I was given is that you have to use your prescription to basically get your sleep back into a normal pattern, then wean yourself off them. So I got a prescription for 14, told to take 1 a day for 5 days, then 1 every 2 days for 10 days, then 1 every 3 days for 12 days and they worked wonders for me.
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by Anonymous)
What did they prescribe you?
Zopiclone, but to be fair, I'd been on Nytol by that point for a while.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#7
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#7
I had that it is quite good.I also had zolpidem (ambien).I take antipsychotics (they are minor tranquillisers) the do their job.I would argue better than sleeping pill as you sleep 12 hours while sleeping pills you sleep 8 hours in my experience.
(Original post by Anonymous)
Zopiclone, but to be fair, I'd been on Nytol by that point for a while.
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by Anonymous)
I had that it is quite good.I also had zolpidem (ambien).I take antipsychotics (they are minor tranquillisers) the do their job.I would argue better than sleeping pill as you sleep 12 hours while sleeping pills you sleep 8 hours in my experience.
Zopiclone is rather good from what I remember. It was enough for me really and helped me get back into a proper sleep pattern. I've not had any problems with my sleep since then and that was over two years ago now.
0
reply
black tea
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by Anonymous)
Privately they prescribe like 30.Xanax is given out incredibly easily also (you can't get Xanax on NHS) like 30 given out at one time and can be prescribed routinely with no questions asked.
Just out of interest, was this an online or a private GP who prescribed these?
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#10
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#10
Private psychiatrist only idiots but online
(Original post by black tea)
Just out of interest, was this an online or a private GP who prescribed these?
0
reply
black tea
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by Anonymous)
Private psychiatrist only idiots but online
That'll be why then. Probs prescribed it so you would keep on seeing them, meaning more money for them
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#12
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by black tea)
That'll be why then. Probs prescribed it so you would keep on seeing them, meaning more money for them
That's not true I see them ever couple months they send me routine prescription by post free of charge I have been seeing them for over a year now.
0
reply
black tea
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by Anonymous)
That's not true I see them ever couple months they send me routine prescription by post free of charge I have been seeing them for over a year now.
If it was recommended practice, they would have given you sleeping tablets on the NHS too
Last edited by black tea; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#14
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#14
They are a consultant I trust them.If it wasn't for them I wouldn't be here they stabilised my depression and are always a phone call away while the NHS psychiatrist didn't prescribe me anything despite feeling incredibly suicidal and being in a very bad place (I waited 5 months to see them too).
(Original post by black tea)
If it was recommend practice, they would have given you sleeping tablets on the NHS too
0
reply
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by Anonymous)
Privately you can get prescription sleeping tablets very easily and as a routine prescription?I know they can be dangerous but if someone takes small doses and not too often it works wonders.
NHS is reluctant to supply anything that isn't necessary because it costs money and resources. They are already stretched pretty thin so they avoid what they can. Especially when things are available over the counter or in shops (paracetamol is a good example) they will try to avoid prescribing it.
Private doctors will give anything that isn't unnecessary cos it doesn't cost them and if anything they get money from it.

You can get various sleep aid stuff over the counter. Talk to a pharmacist about when to take it so you don't over do it. If you have persistent sleep issues see your GP to see if there's any cause you can find and fix.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#16
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#16
Over the counter things are incredibly weak mostly antihistamines which apparently are a bit sedating (not true) you need the good stuff that will knock you off your feet.
(Original post by Kindred)
NHS is reluctant to supply anything that isn't necessary because it costs money and resources. They are already stretched pretty thin so they avoid what they can. Especially when things are available over the counter or in shops (paracetamol is a good example) they will try to avoid prescribing it.
Private doctors will give anything that isn't unnecessary cos it doesn't cost them and if anything they get money from it.

You can get various sleep aid stuff over the counter. Talk to a pharmacist about when to take it so you don't over do it. If you have persistent sleep issues see your GP to see if there's any cause you can find and fix.
0
reply
marinade
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by Anonymous)
Over the counter things are incredibly weak mostly antihistamines which apparently are a bit sedating (not true) you need the good stuff that will knock you off your feet.
Some OTC are a lot weaker than the stuff being talked about in this thread - zolpidem, zopiclone, xanax :eek: and neuroleptics.

However over the country sleeping pills still do have an addiction problem in this country that isn't talked about. Phenergan/Night nurse there are addiction problems people have. If you take either diphenhydramine or promethazine long term there are a bouquet of nasty cognitive side effects.

It varies from person to person on what you are calling 'antihistamines'. One of them can really knock someone out and make them incredibly groggy for about 14 hours. Other people it lasts less time.

The NHS is reluctant to prescribe some of the things on this thread for reasons already said.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA A-level Chemistry Paper 3 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (263)
31.92%
The paper was reasonable (405)
49.15%
Not feeling great about that exam... (92)
11.17%
It was TERRIBLE (64)
7.77%

Watched Threads

View All