Smart_Cookie_
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I'm doing GCSE. I'm predicted a seven but I want higher than that. You're marked on analysis, context, choice of quotations and readers response. Thank you for your time.

Compare the presentation of the power of nature in the extract of the “prelude” and one other poem.

Both William Wordsworth in “the prelude” and Seamus Heaney in “storm on the Island” present humanity’s struggle against nature and the discovery and exploration of its might. Wordsworth was part of the Romantics where nature is romanticized and the power of man is belittled. “Storm on the Island” can be either seen as a poem with a political message or a poem about his home, Ireland. The Irish climate is heavily influenced by the Atlantic ocean which borders its east and his life and actions were dependant on the weather therefore nature.
Initially, in the Prelude; the narrator feels a sense of power. The use of the adjective ‘stealth’ portrays the narrator's actions as devious and the narrator seems self-aware of his immoral endeavours but chooses not to confront his responsibility. However, he’s too immersed in his skill of rowing the “elfin pinnacle” to care emphasizes his arrogance. Moreover, it could suggest that Wordsworth was convinced that he had escaped judgement or punishment for his “act of stealth”. However, as the poem develops we learn that Wordsworth does get punished as his eyes are opened to the true power of nature and his insignificance in this world.
Similarly, Heaney’s poem, “storm on the island” commences with this similar feeling of pride. He believes that “we [the people of Ireland] are prepared”. The main clause exemplifies confidence and readiness for something he really does have no control over; the storm is unpredictable, therefore its almost impossible to feel “prepared”. The exuberates arrogance that shouldn’t be had. Additionally, the use of the collective pronoun “we” shows how Heaney believes that his whole area is facing the storm collectively providing him with some sort of comfort. Realistically, a couple of hundred people is no real match to the elements and all it does it belittles his pride.
Like Wordsworth, Heaney begins to understand that humans, no matter the number, are nothing compared to the power and strength of nature.
However, Wordsworth shows fear of the narrator as he confronts his lack of power. The usage of repetition of the adjective ”huge” conveys guilt and terror felt by the narrator as he becomes fearful and insecure about his weakness and lack of control. Perhaps the “huge peak” the narrator sees is physiological and this is an example of guilt and regret which the narrator feels as he recognises that his previous actions of stealing the boat were wrong.
Furthermore, Wordsworth use of epic poetry implies his message of humility and the significance of humility and its weak position. Wordsworth believed that in our lives there are special moments or experiences where we can go beyond normal reality and appreciate the wider world of nature. Wordsworth as a romantic might have faced internal trouble as he confronts his incognisance compared to the power of nature.
Likewise, Heaney displays the heavy control nature has over his life. He is confined to “sit[ing] tight” while the “wind dives and strafes/ invisibly”. Here, the fear of the islanders is conveyed through the increasing imagery of war. Sitting “tight” unable to do anything whilst an imaginary war is conducted outside must be terrifying however it might’ve related to a real conflict Heaney would’ve faced. In Heaney’s lifetime, he expressed strong views on The Troubles, longed for peace and grieved for the people suffering violence. This line echoes “exploding comfortably” in line 13, but is more real, more immediate.
This is further exemplified through the use of enjambment and caesura to break up the poem in some places and to build a crescendo in others. This creates an uneven rhythm, rather like the storm itself. The enjambment picks up the rhythm before stopping at the end of caesura – granting power to the violent verbs such as “blast”. This shows the utter chaos being orchestrated by the whims of mother nature and all Heaney can do is sit and watch.
Like in “the Prelude” Heaney realises the sheer power and strength of nature and no amount of preparation confidence or arrogance can save him or his people.
Last edited by Smart_Cookie_; 3 months ago
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(Original post by Smart_Cookie_)
I'm doing GCSE. I'm predicted a seven but I want higher than that. You're marked on analysis, context, choice of quotations and readers responce. Thank you for your time.

Compare the presentation of the power of nature in the extract of the “prelude” and one other poem.

Both William Wordsworth in “the prelude” and Seamus Heaney in “storm on the Island” present humanity’s struggle against nature and the discovery and exploration of its might. Wordsworth was part of the Romantics where nature is romanticized and the power of man is belittled. “Storm on the Island” can be either seen as a poem with a political message or a poem about his home, Ireland. Irish climate is heavily influenced by the Atlantic ocean which borders its east and his life and actions were dependant on the weather therefore nature.
Initially, in the Prelude; the narrator feels a sense of power. The use of the adjective ‘stealth’ portrays the narrator's actions as devious and the narrator seems self-aware of his immoral endeavours but chooses not to confront his responsibility. However, he’s too immersed in his skill of rowing the “elfin pinnacle” to care emphasizes his arrogance. Moreover, it could suggest that Wordsworth was convinced that he had escaped judgement or punishment for his “act of stealth”. However, as the poem develops we learn that Wordsworth does get punished as his eyes are opened to the true power of nature and his insignificance in this world.
Similarly, Heaney’s poem, “storm on the island” commences with this similar feeling of pride. He believes that “we [the people of Ireland] are prepared”. The main clause exemplifies confidence and readiness for something he really does have no control over; the storm is unpredictable, therefore its almost impossible to feel “prepared”. The exuberates arrogance that shouldn’t be had. Additionally, the use of the collective pronoun “we” shows how Heaney believes that his whole area is facing the storm collectively providing him with some sort of comfort. Realistically, a couple of hundred people is no real match to the elements and all it does it belittles his pride.
Like Wordsworth, Heaney begins to understand that humans, no matter the number, are nothing compared to the power and strength of nature.
However, Wordsworth shows fear of the narrator as he confronts his lack of power. The usage of repetition of the adjective ”huge” conveys guilt and terror felt by the narrator as he becomes fearful and insecure about his weakness and lack of control. Perhaps the “huge peak” the narrator sees is physiological and this is an example of guilt and regret which the narrator feels as he recognises that his previous actions of stealing the boat were wrong.
Furthermore, Wordsworth use of epic poetry implies his message of humility and the significance of humility and its weak position . Wordsworth believed that in our lives there are special moments or experiences where we can go beyond normal reality and appreciate the wider world of nature. Wordsworth as a romantic might have faced the internal trouble as he confronts his incognisance compared to the power of nature.
Likewise, Heaney displays the heavy control nature has over his life. He is confined to “sit[ing] tight” while the “wind dives and strafes/ invisibly”. Here, the fear of the islanders is conveyed through the increasing imagery of war. Sitting “tight” unable to do anything whilst an imaginary war is conducted outside must be terrifying however it might’ve related to a real conflict Heaney would’ve faced. In Heaney’s lifetime he expressed strong views on The Troubles, longed for peace and grieved for the people suffering violence. This line echoes “exploding comfortably” in line 13, but is more real, more immediate.
This is further exemplified through the use of enjambment and caesura to break up the poem in some places and to build a crescendo in others. This creates an uneven rhythm, rethaer like the storm itself . The enjambment picks up the rhythm before stopping at the end of caesura – granting power to the violent verbs such as “blast”. This shows the utter chaos being orchestrated by the whims of mother nature and all Heaney can do is sit and watch.
Like in “the Prelude” Heaney realises the sheer power and strength of nature and no amount of preparation confidence or arrogance can save him or his people.
Did you proofread this before posting? Is this the final version?
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Smart_Cookie_
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i tried to stay within the time limit and honestly i didn't have enough time
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