Use law and anthropology undergraduate 2020 Watch

Elifo
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Hi everyone, a current year 12 student here!

In the coming months, I am going to be applying to universities for Law and anthropology and LSE is currently my top choice.
However I have some doubts regarding my GCSE's as I didn't receive the best results.

GCSE results below:
English: 8
Maths:5
Science: 5/5 or 5/6... (whoops kinda forgot sorry)
Business: 6
Geography: 5
Spanish: 6
Turkish: 9
So 2 A*, 3 B's and 3 C's.

The current grade requirements for LSE L&A are grades AAB in a level.
My predicted grades are A*A*AB. I may be able to negotiate my grades higher due to extenuating circumstances that affected my mocks and so forth so I am confident in my a level predictions. It's just the GCSE grades that are really worrying me.

I am also confident with my extra curricular like working a part time job and work experiences & my personal statement. It really is my gcses that are worrying me!

Please.. anyone with advice or experience; comment down below!
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Reality Check
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They're not great - but you know that. Law is a highly logical subject, and the relatively low marks in sciences and maths could be a little concerning. GCSE results aren't the be-all and end-all anyway, so I wouldn't really worry unduly. You just really need to smash your A levels - a good prediction and result of A*AA or A*A*A will more than make up for those slightly wobbly GCSE grades.
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Elifo
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Thank you for your advice! I definitely am aiming high with my a-levels. Additionally, I am also re-taking my maths GCSE just to see if I could possibly get a 6 but I'm not too sure about that happening; so all my concerns and efforts are now focused on achieving the best possible A-level grades.
(Original post by Reality Check)
They're not great - but you know that. Law is a highly logical subject, and the relatively low marks in sciences and maths could be a little concerning. GCSE results aren't the be-all and end-all anyway, so I wouldn't really worry unduly. You just really need to smash your A levels - a good prediction and result of A*AA or A*A*A will more than make up for those slightly wobbly GCSE grades.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Elifo)
Thank you for your advice! I definitely am aiming high with my a-levels. Additionally, I am also re-taking my maths GCSE just to see if I could possibly get a 6 but I'm not too sure about that happening; so all my concerns and efforts are now focused on achieving the best possible A-level grades.
I really wouldn't bother about retaking the maths - you've passed it, and there's very little benefit in getting a 6. Plus lots of unis don't even accept resat results. I'd concentrate instead of working on the A levels - and getting ready for them by doing some bridging work if necessary. Much more use than doing your maths again
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LeapingLucy
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LSE is generally quite inconsistent with GCSEs. Every year, many people who are rejected are given the explanation that their GCSEs were too low, but others with just as low or lower GCSEs get offers.

Overall, I get the impression that LSE are happy to overlook your GCSEs if you have great A-levels and an interesting personal statement.

They also take into account the kind of school you go to - if you go to a state school that tends to perform below the national average, then that will mitigate your low GCSEs.
Last edited by LeapingLucy; 4 weeks ago
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LeapingLucy
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Personal statements are extremely important for LSE admissions - LSE receive applications from far more highly qualified applicants than they have places available, and they don't interview, so your personal statement is a key factor on which your application will be judged. Every year people with straight A*s get rejected on the basis of a personal statement that isn't quite what LSE is looking for. With that in mind, this is my advice for writing a strong personal statement:

1) Quality not quantity, analysis not listing - A personal statement is not a list of all your achievements, extra-curriculars and every book you've ever read. Don't namedrop a book you read or a talk you went just for the sake of mentioning it - instead, find an aspect or fact from it that you find really interesting, and talk about it. Try to draw connections with your other reading/extra-curriculars. Where possible, show how one talk sparked your interest in - e.g. decolonisation/American politics/global financial markets - and so you developed that interest by reading more about it, or listening to a podcast/watching a documentary about it. Show your learning process, and the way your mind draws connections between things.

2) Explain WHY something interested you - DON'T say "attending maths sessions after school furthered my interest in mathematics." DO say "in after-school maths sessions, I first learnt about *theory/phenomenon X* - this inspired me to explore it further by reading Author Y's book on *topic X*; what most stood out to me from this book was *fact Z*."
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Elifo
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I honestly don’t know how to thank you for this boost of motivation! As the user above stated, right now what’s most important are my A-levels so I will definitely be trying my hardest to get the best grades.

Your response has really shone a light and reminded me of how important PS’s are for LSE. Everything you mentioned is immensely useful. Once again, thank you so much for your response.
(Original post by LeapingLucy)
Personal statements are extremely important for LSE admissions - LSE receive applications from far more highly qualified applicants than they have places available, and they don't interview, so your personal statement is a key factor on which your application will be judged. Every year people with straight A*s get rejected on the basis of a personal statement that isn't quite what LSE is looking for. With that in mind, this is my advice for writing a strong personal statement:

1) Quality not quantity, analysis not listing - A personal statement is not a list of all your achievements, extra-curriculars and every book you've ever read. Don't namedrop a book you read or a talk you went just for the sake of mentioning it - instead, find an aspect or fact from it that you find really interesting, and talk about it. Try to draw connections with your other reading/extra-curriculars. Where possible, show how one talk sparked your interest in - e.g. decolonisation/American politics/global financial markets - and so you developed that interest by reading more about it, or listening to a podcast/watching a documentary about it. Show your learning process, and the way your mind draws connections between things.

2) Explain WHY something interested you - DON'T say "attending maths sessions after school furthered my interest in mathematics." DO say "in after-school maths sessions, I first learnt about *theory/phenomenon X* - this inspired me to explore it further by reading Author Y's book on *topic X*; what most stood out to me from this book was *fact Z*."
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Isabella133
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Hey, this is the exact undergrad course i’d like to apply to, at LSE too! I have just taken my GCSEs and am worried that i didn’t do well either, possibly worse than you. Let me know how everything goes for you - my snapchat is isabella.133, instagram isabella.bda
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