I have an offer for Medicine at BSMS, But I want to study in America Watch

Poll: What should I do?
Decline BSMS (or defer) and attempt to apply for US med schools (1)
33.33%
Accept BSMS, do adjustment once I graduate to practice in the US (2)
66.67%
oe54
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#1
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#1
Hello all,

I would like some advice as for what choice I should make.

To give some context: I am a final year Biomedical Science BSc student and I'm expecting to graduate with a 1st class this summer.
I am currently holding an offer for Medicine at BSMS on the condition that I obtain a 2:1.
I am a US citizen and I aspire to practice medicine in the US in the future even if I graduate from the UK and I hope to specialise in surgery.
I have never applied to US med schools and I am aware that I would either have to defer my offer from BSMS or decline it in order to apply to the US.

Please can anyone who has any opinions on my situation give me any advice? Preferably if you have knowledge of the application process to US Med schools.
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zero_gravity
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(Original post by oe54)
Hello all,

I would like some advice as for what choice I should make.

To give some context: I am a final year Biomedical Science BSc student and I'm expecting to graduate with a 1st class this summer.
I am currently holding an offer for Medicine at BSMS on the condition that I obtain a 2:1.
I am a US citizen and I aspire to practice medicine in the US in the future even if I graduate from the UK and I hope to specialise in surgery.
I have never applied to US med schools and I am aware that I would either have to defer my offer from BSMS or decline it in order to apply to the US.

Please can anyone who has any opinions on my situation give me any advice? Preferably if you have knowledge of the application process to US Med schools.
Since the practice of medicine is jurisdictional, I think it's worthwhile to apply to U.S. schools as opposed to staying in the UK to study. First of all, as an international student, UK schools are ridiculously expensive for medicine. You also have to factor in the time you spend in finding residency when you head back to the U.S., as well as the number of equivalency exams that you need to take to be qualified in the U.S. It's not worth the time and investment to be doing that when going to a U.S. school would take away that obstacle.

Given that you are expecting a first class degree right now, I think you have a decent chance of getting into a good U.S. school, provided that you get a good MCAT score.
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oe54
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Hi, thank you for your reply.I feel you may have misunderstood my post. I am currently based and educated in the UK. I would likely have to adjust my degree, I am a home student in the UK as I have dual citizenship.If I decline my offer to study medicine and I don’t get into a US school then I risk losing 2 years at least
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zero_gravity
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(Original post by oe54)
Hi, thank you for your reply.I feel you may have misunderstood my post. I am currently based and educated in the UK. I would likely have to adjust my degree, I am a home student in the UK as I have dual citizenship.If I decline my offer to study medicine and I don’t get into a US school then I risk losing 2 years at least
I understand that you are finishing up your last year in the UK. I also see that you are a dual citizen.

Even if you are paying home fees, I don't think it's a good idea to accept your offer for BSMS. As I mentioned earlier in my post, medicine is largely jurisdictional, which means that you will have to jump through a few obstacles in order to be qualified to take the exams and apply as an international graduate (if you plan to practise in the U.S. in the future). Since you are expected to get a first class degree, why not just apply to U.S. schools and avoid the hassle? It should also be easier for you to apply for residency if you studied at a U.S. school, as opposed to competing with a larger pool of candidates as an international graduate.
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mnnbv
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(Original post by zero_gravity)
I understand that you are finishing up your last year in the UK. I also see that you are a dual citizen.

Even if you are paying home fees, I don't think it's a good idea to accept your offer for BSMS. As I mentioned earlier in my post, medicine is largely jurisdictional, which means that you will have to jump through a few obstacles in order to be qualified to take the exams and apply as an international graduate (if you plan to practise in the U.S. in the future). Since you are expected to get a first class degree, why not just apply to U.S. schools and avoid the hassle? It should also be easier for you to apply for residency if you studied at a U.S. school, as opposed to competing with a larger pool of candidates as an international graduate.
Yep, I agree. In the future I want to/ aspire to move to the USA to practice Medicine. By far the easier route is to study in a Medical school there.
If not, you will have to sit the USMLE at least up to part 2, and obtain USA experience and overcome multiple other hurdles such as Visa problems just to be in a chance of getting a residency. However these are super competitive for International Graduates and most likely you would not be able to apply for the speciality you would otherwise do here. Most surgical posts are impossible to obtain, so most successful applicants are those that applied to Family Medicine in rural parts of the US.
The only reason I didn't apply to go to an American Medical School for university was crazy international fees which I couldn't afford.
I'm starting Medical school in the UK this year, hopefully within 10 years I'll be in the US!

Give this a read, as the process to actually go to a medical school in the US is also a lil difficult. Athough slightly less competitive and will give you more opportunities down the line:

https://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/medical-school-admissions-doctor/articles/2017-10-31/international-students-get-into-us-medical-schools
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Last edited by mnnbv; 4 weeks ago
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oe54
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Although I have a first class degree, as far as I’m aware if still have to adjust it and do at least a year in an American college. All this and it isn’t guaranteed I’ll get a place in medschool, whereas I already have an offer here. But it’s seems that it is way more difficult to find a job as an international than to find a place at medschool. Also how would funding work for me, I am a US citizen so do I pay home fees? How do you get funded as it seems very expensive?
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oe54
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(Original post by mnnbv)
Yep, I agree. In the future I want to/ aspire to move to the USA to practice Medicine. By far the easier route is to study in a Medical school there.
If not, you will have to sit the USMLE at least up to part 2, and obtain USA experience and overcome multiple other hurdles such as Visa problems just to be in a chance of getting a residency. However these are super competitive for International Graduates and most likely you would not be able to apply for the speciality you would otherwise do here. Most surgical posts are impossible to obtain, so most successful applicants are those that applied to Family Medicine in rural parts of the US.
The only reason I didn't apply to go to an American Medical School for university was crazy international fees which I couldn't afford.
I'm starting Medical school in the UK this year, hopefully within 10 years I'll be in the US!

Give this a read, as the process to actually go to a medical school in the US is also a lil difficult. Athough slightly less competitive and will give you more opportunities down the line:

https://www.usnews.com/education/blo...edical-schools
I wouldn’t have to worry about Visas as I’m a US citizen. But for me to apply to medschools there I would have to adjust my degree and go through the whole application system which I don’t know much about as of yet. In the end I could end up being declined and also losing my British offer.
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mnnbv
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(Original post by oe54)
Although I have a first class degree, as far as I’m aware if still have to adjust it and do a year at least in an American college. All this and it isn’t guaranteed I’ll get a place in medschool, whereas I already have an offer here. But it’s seems that it is way more difficult to find a job as an international than to find a palace at medschool. Also how would funding work for me, I am a US citizen so do I pay home fees? How do you get funded as it seems very expensive?
I have no clue about funding, someone else can probably help you there.
I guess it depends what is most important to you. Studying medicine for sure, ie accepting the offer with the option of shifting over. Or maybe studying medicine/ doing another degree to study and live in the USA.

Ultimately, many people every year make the shift to the USA from the UK to practise medicine. The USA has a shortage of doctors despite increasing places to study In medical schools. Therefore there are always more residency places which are open to international students. This shortage is projected to increase in the next couple years because of an aging population etc. It is difficult to move, but it is possible. And, British medical schools are arguably more respected than other European and Asian Universities where other IMG (International Medical Graduates) applicants to American residencies will be applying.
So you would still be in a good position to move, you would just have to put the work in.

Maybe you should contact an American Medical school and then an American residency program and find out what they suggest?
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Last edited by mnnbv; 4 weeks ago
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oe54
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(Original post by mnnbv)
I have no clue about funding, someone else can probably help you there.
I guess it depends what is most important to you. Studying medicine for sure, ie accepting the offer with the option of shifting over. Or maybe studying medicine/ doing another degree to study and live in the USA.

Ultimately, many people every year make the shift to the USA from the UK to practise medicine. The USA has a shortage of doctors despite increasing places to study In medical schools. Therefore there are always more residency places which are open to international students. This shortage is projected to increase in the next couple years because of an aging population etc. It is difficult to move, but it is possible. And, British medical schools are arguably more respected than other European and Asian Universities where other IMG (International Medical Graduates) applicants to American residencies will be applying.
So you would still be in a good position to move, you would just have to put the work in.

Maybe you should contact an American Medical school and then an American residency program and find out what they suggest?
Thank you for your reply! I definitely need time to research and weigh my options. I’ll call up a few Universities and Residency programs and see what they say.
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zero_gravity
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(Original post by oe54)
Although I have a first class degree, as far as I’m aware if still have to adjust it and do at least a year in an American college. All this and it isn’t guaranteed I’ll get a place in medschool, whereas I already have an offer here. But it’s seems that it is way more difficult to find a job as an international than to find a place at medschool. Also how would funding work for me, I am a US citizen so do I pay home fees? How do you get funded as it seems very expensive?
It would be somewhat difficult to get enough funding, but I believe you should be able to apply for financial aid as a U.S. citizen. Home fees are charged differently in U.S. schools. It largely depends on which school you are going to. For state colleges, there is generally an in-state tuition fee and out-of-state tuition fee. As for private colleges, there is generally only one fee for all students, but financial aid is more abundant.
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