I'm an LSE BSc Maths and Economics student - AMA Watch

londoncricket
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Hi guys,

I remember that when I applied to the LSE there weren't many TSR forumites who could help with BSc Maths and Economics.

Fast forward 2 years & I am at the end of my second year at the LSE. I've really enjoyed my time here & would like to help TSR with an 'Ask Me Anything' post, so here goes.

About me
  • State school educated throughout, firstly in a comprehensive school in the East of England, followed by a high performing sixth form college
  • GCSE: 6A*s & 5 As, A level: A*AA, offer was A*AA in Maths, Further Mathematics and Economics respectively
  • personal statement included relevant books that I have read, work experience that I have done & other bits and bobs. Nothing spectacular & very standard stuff. Nothing that you wouldn't find on other competitive applications to similar courses at Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Warwick, UCL, etc.
  • During university I have done a lot. Like a LOT. I have participated in sports, cultural events, career related societies, explored the capital, completed relevant work experience, learnt some great interesting material & interacted with some of the world's leaders in economics, including Nobel laureates

If you have any question about LSE / university in London / getting in / anything else, please do comment below & I will try my best to reply within a week!

NOTE: I may answer your questions referring to the LSE website, because there is a wealth of information on there. But if your question is about personal experiences, background & the like, I'll answer them using my own experiences.
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lemmens
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(Original post by londoncricket)
Hi guys,

I remember that when I applied to the LSE there weren't many TSR forumites who could help with BSc Maths and Economics.

Fast forward 2 years & I am at the end of my second year at the LSE. I've really enjoyed my time here & would like to help TSR with an 'Ask Me Anything' post, so here goes.

About me
  • State school educated throughout, firstly in a comprehensive school in the East of England, followed by a high performing sixth form college
  • GCSE: 6A*s & 5 As, A level: A*AA, offer was A*AA in Maths, Further Mathematics and Economics respectively
  • personal statement included relevant books that I have read, work experience that I have done & other bits and bobs. Nothing spectacular & very standard stuff. Nothing that you wouldn't find on other competitive applications to similar courses at Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Warwick, UCL, etc.
  • During university I have done a lot. Like a LOT. I have participated in sports, cultural events, career related societies, explored the capital, completed relevant work experience, learnt some great interesting material & interacted with some of the world's leaders in economics, including Nobel laureates


If you have any question about LSE / university in London / getting in / anything else, please do comment below & I will try my best to reply within a week!
Thank you so much for making this and sharing your experiences!!

Maths is one of my favourite subjects, and I’ve recently become quite interested in its application to economics and finance. I wouldn’t want to study just economics as maths is what motivates me the most, so how much maths do you get to study?

Also, as someone who hasn’t taken A-level econ, is a joint course something I would struggle with? Would my application be any less competitive?
(I study maths, further maths, physics and chemistry)
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lemmens
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(Original post by londoncricket)
Hi guys,

I remember that when I applied to the LSE there weren't many TSR forumites who could help with BSc Maths and Economics.

Fast forward 2 years & I am at the end of my second year at the LSE. I've really enjoyed my time here & would like to help TSR with an 'Ask Me Anything' post, so here goes.

About me
  • State school educated throughout, firstly in a comprehensive school in the East of England, followed by a high performing sixth form college
  • GCSE: 6A*s & 5 As, A level: A*AA, offer was A*AA in Maths, Further Mathematics and Economics respectively
  • personal statement included relevant books that I have read, work experience that I have done & other bits and bobs. Nothing spectacular & very standard stuff. Nothing that you wouldn't find on other competitive applications to similar courses at Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Warwick, UCL, etc.
  • During university I have done a lot. Like a LOT. I have participated in sports, cultural events, career related societies, explored the capital, completed relevant work experience, learnt some great interesting material & interacted with some of the world's leaders in economics, including Nobel laureates


If you have any question about LSE / university in London / getting in / anything else, please do comment below & I will try my best to reply within a week!
Thank you so much for making this and sharing your experiences!!

Maths is one of my favourite subjects, and I’ve recently become quite interested in its application to economics and finance. I wouldn’t want to study just economics as maths is what motivates me the most, so how much maths do you get to study?

Also, as someone who hasn’t taken A-level econ, is a joint course something I would struggle with? Would my application be any less competitive?
(I study maths, further maths, physics and chemistry)
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londoncricket
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(Original post by lemmens)
Thank you so much for making this and sharing your experiences!!

Maths is one of my favourite subjects, and I’ve recently become quite interested in its application to economics and finance. I wouldn’t want to study just economics as maths is what motivates me the most, so how much maths do you get to study?

Also, as someone who hasn’t taken A-level econ, is a joint course something I would struggle with? Would my application be any less competitive?
(I study maths, further maths, physics and chemistry)
Hi Lemmens,

No worries at all! Glad to help.

  • I think it’s really important to clarify that undergraduate level maths is very different to A level maths. You should try to get a taste of university level maths before you apply. I recommend that you Google “introduction to real analysis” & you should be able to find a few YouTube videos & perhaps some university material (doesn’t matter which university). Go through these & see if you find it interesting at all. If you don’t, you should seriously reconsider choosing maths. If you do, I’m sure maths will be a great option for you.
  • I study maths a little bit more than 50% of my time, I’d say. But given what you’ve mentioned, I think it is best for you to choose BSc Maths with Economics. That will be more aligned with your interests.
  • You likely won’t struggle with the material, if you are good enough at maths. Your A level options are perfect, there’s no issues there. Your application to MwE will not be any less competitive, many of my friends are doing very well at the LSE after having not studied A level Economics & doing Maths and Economics / Maths with Economics. Heck, I even know people who didn’t study A level Economics doing BSc Economics!

Let me know if you have any more questions.
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lemmens
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(Original post by londoncricket)
Hi Lemmens,

No worries at all! Glad to help.

  • I think it’s really important to clarify that undergraduate level maths is very different to A level maths. You should try to get a taste of university level maths before you apply. I recommend that you Google “introduction to real analysis” & you should be able to find a few YouTube videos & perhaps some university material (doesn’t matter which university). Go through these & see if you find it interesting at all. If you don’t, you should seriously reconsider choosing maths. If you do, I’m sure maths will be a great option for you.
  • I study maths a little bit more than 50% of my time, I’d say. But given what you’ve mentioned, I think it is best for you to choose BSc Maths with Economics. That will be more aligned with your interests.
  • You likely won’t struggle with the material, if you are good enough at maths. Your A level options are perfect, there’s no issues there. Your application to MwE will not be any less competitive, many of my friends are doing very well at the LSE after having not studied A level Economics & doing Maths and Economics / Maths with Economics. Heck, I even know people who didn’t study A level Economics doing BSc Economics!

Let me know if you have any more questions.
I’ve been mainly focusing on my AS exams recently but have given a look at some first year lectures online. I’ll definitely watch some videos and read up on the topics you’ve suggested, that’s really helpful.

Oh so maths with economics is more heavily weighted towards maths, I actually don’t think I was aware there were two separate courses!! Right okay, thank you so much are there also any areas in economics that you’d be able to recommend for someone who has no background studying it?
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Zürich
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Is LSE still the festering rat race for internships and general lack of student experience as it was?
(Original post by londoncricket)
Hi guys,

I remember that when I applied to the LSE there weren't many TSR forumites who could help with BSc Maths and Economics.

Fast forward 2 years & I am at the end of my second year at the LSE. I've really enjoyed my time here & would like to help TSR with an 'Ask Me Anything' post, so here goes.

About me
  • State school educated throughout, firstly in a comprehensive school in the East of England, followed by a high performing sixth form college
  • GCSE: 6A*s & 5 As, A level: A*AA, offer was A*AA in Maths, Further Mathematics and Economics respectively
  • personal statement included relevant books that I have read, work experience that I have done & other bits and bobs. Nothing spectacular & very standard stuff. Nothing that you wouldn't find on other competitive applications to similar courses at Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Warwick, UCL, etc.
  • During university I have done a lot. Like a LOT. I have participated in sports, cultural events, career related societies, explored the capital, completed relevant work experience, learnt some great interesting material & interacted with some of the world's leaders in economics, including Nobel laureates

If you have any question about LSE / university in London / getting in / anything else, please do comment below & I will try my best to reply within a week!

NOTE: I may answer your questions referring to the LSE website, because there is a wealth of information on there. But if your question is about personal experiences, background & the like, I'll answer them using my own experiences.
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londoncricket
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Yeah of course you must focus on those first. The Analysis can wait haha. Yeah it’s definitely weighted a lot more to maths. What do you mean ‘areas’? As in, areas to research?
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londoncricket
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Hahahahah yep, unfortunately so. I feel as though a change towards tech firms is on the way, but that’s definitely a far way out. LSE alum?

Regarding student satisfaction, I am confident in Minouche’s 2030 vision for the LSE. I think that will really improve the LSE as a place for undergrads. But that will take time, & a lot of it at that.
(Original post by Zürich)
Is LSE still the festering rat race for internships and general lack of student experience as it was?
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lemmens
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Yeah of course you must focus on those first. The Analysis can wait haha. Yeah it’s definitely weighted a lot more to maths. What do you mean ‘areas’? As in, areas to research?
yes, just more introductory topics that I could read up on get some base knowledge from
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londoncricket
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yes, just more introductory topics that I could read up on get some base knowledge from
You are not required to. If you attend the LSE for the BSc Maths and Economics / BSc Maths with Economics degree, you will be enrolled on to the course for those with no previous experience in Economics. This will get you up to speed for any second year course that you choose to take. Note:

"Applications from those with Mathematics, Further Mathematics and one other subject will be considered. Other subjects commonly studied at A-level include Chemistry and Physics. There is no requirement for students to have formally studied Economics before."

from: http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...-and-Economics

If you wish to look at some Economics before coming to the LSE though, why not look through an AS or A level Economics textbook? That would definitely be a good place to start, or perhaps look at some Khan Academy videos.
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(Original post by londoncricket)
Hi guys,

I remember that when I applied to the LSE there weren't many TSR forumites who could help with BSc Maths and Economics.

Fast forward 2 years & I am at the end of my second year at the LSE. I've really enjoyed my time here & would like to help TSR with an 'Ask Me Anything' post, so here goes.

About me
  • State school educated throughout, firstly in a comprehensive school in the East of England, followed by a high performing sixth form college
  • GCSE: 6A*s & 5 As, A level: A*AA, offer was A*AA in Maths, Further Mathematics and Economics respectively
  • personal statement included relevant books that I have read, work experience that I have done & other bits and bobs. Nothing spectacular & very standard stuff. Nothing that you wouldn't find on other competitive applications to similar courses at Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Warwick, UCL, etc.
  • During university I have done a lot. Like a LOT. I have participated in sports, cultural events, career related societies, explored the capital, completed relevant work experience, learnt some great interesting material & interacted with some of the world's leaders in economics, including Nobel laureates

If you have any question about LSE / university in London / getting in / anything else, please do comment below & I will try my best to reply within a week!

NOTE: I may answer your questions referring to the LSE website, because there is a wealth of information on there. But if your question is about personal experiences, background & the like, I'll answer them using my own experiences.
How many hours of studying should be done each day? Do you have to do the recommended 40 hours a week as they say on the university? How much free time do you have, do you have enough to engage in societiies etc? I am feeling intimidated going in and starting this year.
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GamerBoy123
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(Original post by londoncricket)
Hi guys,

I remember that when I applied to the LSE there weren't many TSR forumites who could help with BSc Maths and Economics.

Fast forward 2 years & I am at the end of my second year at the LSE. I've really enjoyed my time here & would like to help TSR with an 'Ask Me Anything' post, so here goes.

About me
  • State school educated throughout, firstly in a comprehensive school in the East of England, followed by a high performing sixth form college
  • GCSE: 6A*s & 5 As, A level: A*AA, offer was A*AA in Maths, Further Mathematics and Economics respectively
  • personal statement included relevant books that I have read, work experience that I have done & other bits and bobs. Nothing spectacular & very standard stuff. Nothing that you wouldn't find on other competitive applications to similar courses at Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Warwick, UCL, etc.
  • During university I have done a lot. Like a LOT. I have participated in sports, cultural events, career related societies, explored the capital, completed relevant work experience, learnt some great interesting material & interacted with some of the world's leaders in economics, including Nobel laureates

If you have any question about LSE / university in London / getting in / anything else, please do comment below & I will try my best to reply within a week!

NOTE: I may answer your questions referring to the LSE website, because there is a wealth of information on there. But if your question is about personal experiences, background & the like, I'll answer them using my own experiences.
hey thanks for ur background.

I wanted to ask how interesting is the economics course. I was thinking about economics and geography?
Secondly what would you in terms of extracurricular activities think gave you admission and what should one do to get into an economics based degree.
thirdly is the workload manageable and do you ever feel as if your peers are ahead if you or is everyone able to manage.
and fourthly how is uni life in general, in terms of making friends relationships and the activities outside of lessons.


Thanks so much I appreciate it! sorry for the many questions
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lemmens
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(Original post by londoncricket)
You are not required to. If you attend the LSE for the BSc Maths and Economics / BSc Maths with Economics degree, you will be enrolled on to the course for those with no previous experience in Economics. This will get you up to speed for any second year course that you choose to take. Note:

"Applications from those with Mathematics, Further Mathematics and one other subject will be considered. Other subjects commonly studied at A-level include Chemistry and Physics. There is no requirement for students to have formally studied Economics before."

from: http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...-and-Economics

If you wish to look at some Economics before coming to the LSE though, why not look through an AS or A level Economics textbook? That would definitely be a good place to start, or perhaps look at some Khan Academy videos.
okay, thank you so so much for all of your help and advice here, I honestly do appreciate it and you taking the time so much
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(Original post by londoncricket)
Hi guys,

I remember that when I applied to the LSE there weren't many TSR forumites who could help with BSc Maths and Economics.

Fast forward 2 years & I am at the end of my second year at the LSE. I've really enjoyed my time here & would like to help TSR with an 'Ask Me Anything' post, so here goes.

About me
  • State school educated throughout, firstly in a comprehensive school in the East of England, followed by a high performing sixth form college
  • GCSE: 6A*s & 5 As, A level: A*AA, offer was A*AA in Maths, Further Mathematics and Economics respectively
  • personal statement included relevant books that I have read, work experience that I have done & other bits and bobs. Nothing spectacular & very standard stuff. Nothing that you wouldn't find on other competitive applications to similar courses at Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Warwick, UCL, etc.
  • During university I have done a lot. Like a LOT. I have participated in sports, cultural events, career related societies, explored the capital, completed relevant work experience, learnt some great interesting material & interacted with some of the world's leaders in economics, including Nobel laureates

If you have any question about LSE / university in London / getting in / anything else, please do comment below & I will try my best to reply within a week!

NOTE: I may answer your questions referring to the LSE website, because there is a wealth of information on there. But if your question is about personal experiences, background & the like, I'll answer them using my own experiences.
Hi, im a first year at LSE and im worried about failing 2 modules and hence being forced to resit the year. I wouldnt mind taking a year out however I'm worried about how the resit year may impact future internship/job opportunities? I'm interested in Law/consulting/banking so was wondering whether you knew of anyone who had to resit their modules and was then able to get a job/internship in the aforementioned sectors?
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username4743820
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Hi, im a first year at LSE and im worried about failing 2 modules and hence being forced to resit the year. I wouldnt mind taking a year out however I'm worried about how the resit year may impact future internship/job opportunities? I'm interested in Law/consulting/banking so was wondering whether you knew of anyone who had to resit their modules and was then able to get a job/internship in the aforementioned sectors?
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londoncricket
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(Original post by Anonymous)
How many hours of studying should be done each day? Do you have to do the recommended 40 hours a week as they say on the university? How much free time do you have, do you have enough to engage in societiies etc? I am feeling intimidated going in and starting this year.
Make NO mistake, LSE is a place for people who are happy & motivated to work very very hard for a long three years. Do not be intimidated: I felt very intimidated too, when coming to the LSE. I really didn't think that I would survive against the hardened Londoners who have been facing stiff competition for years at their schools. But I managed to do it & am happy here. Don't forget that someone thought that you would be good enough to study here & argued for your application at the Admissions Committee! LSE Admissions firmly believes that you are good enough to get a 2:1 at least

Studying per day isn't really the way I think about it. In September & October, I won't really be doing much more than classes & lectures. Maybe a couple of office hours (similar to lunchtime help sessions at school) but that would be to meet some cool & interesting professors rather than for work. Fast forward to March & work is the ONLY thing that I will be doing. 12 hours per day, 7 days per week, the Library has gone 24 hours & I know people who will be there for the majority of the day, going home only for a shower. It's crazy.

40 hours per week is an average that you can expect during October through to February or so. That's fairly standard I'd say. I have enough time to engage in societies & the like & each person will make time to do the things that he / she loves. The more you do, the more motivated you need to be in each thing. Don't get me wrong: I'm not President of 5 societies & running a business on the side, there's no time for that. But you will find 2 / 3 things that you really like here & you'll get involved & make time for that. That's not usually a problem, I think.

(Original post by GamerBoy123)
hey thanks for ur background.

I wanted to ask how interesting is the economics course. I was thinking about economics and geography?
Secondly what would you in terms of extracurricular activities think gave you admission and what should one do to get into an economics based degree.
thirdly is the workload manageable and do you ever feel as if your peers are ahead if you or is everyone able to manage.
and fourthly how is uni life in general, in terms of making friends relationships and the activities outside of lessons.


Thanks so much I appreciate it! sorry for the many questions
No worries! Glad to help.

The BSc Economics degree is really interesting. I recommend that you check out the course modules that you can take on the LSE website. In third year, you have a lot of choice of which modules you choose. In first & second year you have one choice, out of four modules.

I do not study Geography and Economics, so I don't believe that I am qualified to comment about the course. I don't wanna give you an uninformed opinion but I have a fair few friends studying that degree & they seem to be fairly happy with the degree itself. They do a fair few essays for their geography modules though.

(Do not forget that my personal statement was geared towards maths and Economics joint honours degrees) Extracurricular activities on my personal statement included: Gold DofE, two books that I had read (one on statistical philosophy & one on the financial crisis of 2008), my internship at a fund manager, IEA essay entry, Bank of England's Target 2.0 competition (no, we didn't win lol), a summer school that I was on, couple of maths lectures that I had watched, Treasurer of the Student Council at my college, President of my college's Economics Society, President of my college's Maths Society.

Hahahaha the last point. Okay, so the type of people who come to study at the LSE were top performers in their schools. It's a bit of shock when you immediately become nothing special at all. You almost certainly won't be the smartest person in your year / degree programme / department / halls of residence. You will be mediocre & feel small in comparison to everyone else. That's just how it is in the UK's top universities. Oh, & I'm not even thinking about the internationals yet, who have lived & breathed maths since year 7, just to be able to get in to the LSE. Workload seems unmanageable at a lot of points. I have NEVER felt ahead of the course. I have NEVER felt as though I have completed all my work for the day hahahah. Often feels as though your peers are ahead of you, but it's important to realise that it isn't really a competition. The environment here really does push you to work hard, as hard as you possibly can.

University life is great, but it really depends on what you're looking for. If you're looking for the typical UK undergrad life (read flatmates, not doing any work for the first three months, most people from within the UK, etc.), then I recommend that you don't apply to the LSE. It's not that, at all. It's a high pressure environment which attracts those who have a genuine deep desire & motivation to do well in life, academically and career wise. It's fairly well known that LSE grads often work at the top firms, etc., many also go on to work in top positions in governments around the world. Your peers will go on to do fairly great things, but that comes at a cost: LSE life really isn't an easygoing one. If being in an environment with super smart & driven people excites you, I'm sure you'll have a great time here! You'll make loads of friends, if you try. Big tips on making friends at the LSE - move into LSE only halls during first year & join a sports team. That will really help you make more friends.

Don't apologise! I'm happy to help.

(Original post by ballack_13)
Hi, im a first year at LSE and im worried about failing 2 modules and hence being forced to resit the year. I wouldnt mind taking a year out however I'm worried about how the resit year may impact future internship/job opportunities? I'm interested in Law/consulting/banking so was wondering whether you knew of anyone who had to resit their modules and was then able to get a job/internship in the aforementioned sectors?
Don't stress so much. The LSE is a tough place. It's a massive shock to most people.

Don't worry too much if you fail those 2 modules. I know people who have failed a module or two in first year, retaken the year & everything is fine. Just because you resit a couple of modules doesn't mean that you won't get a job or an internship. I know people who have got internships after retaking modules, yes.

If you fail one module, you may resit that module during your second year & not have to retake the year. If it's more than one, you will likely need to resit the year, but only the modules that you failed. One of my close friends did exactly that, he's technically in first year again & is actually interning at two different places this summer.

In general, as long as you get a 2:1 in your degree, corporates won't care if you resat a module or two. They've got bigger & more important things to be thinking about haha.
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sumboy
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(Original post by londoncricket)
Make NO mistake, LSE is a place for people who are happy & motivated to work very very hard for a long three years. Do not be intimidated: I felt very intimidated too, when coming to the LSE. I really didn't think that I would survive against the hardened Londoners who have been facing stiff competition for years at their schools. But I managed to do it & am happy here. Don't forget that someone thought that you would be good enough to study here & argued for your application at the Admissions Committee! LSE Admissions firmly believes that you are good enough to get a 2:1 at least

Studying per day isn't really the way I think about it. In September & October, I won't really be doing much more than classes & lectures. Maybe a couple of office hours (similar to lunchtime help sessions at school) but that would be to meet some cool & interesting professors rather than for work. Fast forward to March & work is the ONLY thing that I will be doing. 12 hours per day, 7 days per week, the Library has gone 24 hours & I know people who will be there for the majority of the day, going home only for a shower. It's crazy.

40 hours per week is an average that you can expect during October through to February or so. That's fairly standard I'd say. I have enough time to engage in societies & the like & each person will make time to do the things that he / she loves. The more you do, the more motivated you need to be in each thing. Don't get me wrong: I'm not President of 5 societies & running a business on the side, there's no time for that. But you will find 2 / 3 things that you really like here & you'll get involved & make time for that. That's not usually a problem, I think.



No worries! Glad to help.

The BSc Economics degree is really interesting. I recommend that you check out the course modules that you can take on the LSE website. In third year, you have a lot of choice of which modules you choose. In first & second year you have one choice, out of four modules.

I do not study Geography and Economics, so I don't believe that I am qualified to comment about the course. I don't wanna give you an uninformed opinion but I have a fair few friends studying that degree & they seem to be fairly happy with the degree itself. They do a fair few essays for their geography modules though.

(Do not forget that my personal statement was geared towards maths and Economics joint honours degrees) Extracurricular activities on my personal statement included: Gold DofE, two books that I had read (one on statistical philosophy & one on the financial crisis of 2008), my internship at a fund manager, IEA essay entry, Bank of England's Target 2.0 competition (no, we didn't win lol), a summer school that I was on, couple of maths lectures that I had watched, Treasurer of the Student Council at my college, President of my college's Economics Society, President of my college's Maths Society.

Hahahaha the last point. Okay, so the type of people who come to study at the LSE were top performers in their schools. It's a bit of shock when you immediately become nothing special at all. You almost certainly won't be the smartest person in your year / degree programme / department / halls of residence. You will be mediocre & feel small in comparison to everyone else. That's just how it is in the UK's top universities. Oh, & I'm not even thinking about the internationals yet, who have lived & breathed maths since year 7, just to be able to get in to the LSE. Workload seems unmanageable at a lot of points. I have NEVER felt ahead of the course. I have NEVER felt as though I have completed all my work for the day hahahah. Often feels as though your peers are ahead of you, but it's important to realise that it isn't really a competition. The environment here really does push you to work hard, as hard as you possibly can.

University life is great, but it really depends on what you're looking for. If you're looking for the typical UK undergrad life (read flatmates, not doing any work for the first three months, most people from within the UK, etc.), then I recommend that you don't apply to the LSE. It's not that, at all. It's a high pressure environment which attracts those who have a genuine deep desire & motivation to do well in life, academically and career wise. It's fairly well known that LSE grads often work at the top firms, etc., many also go on to work in top positions in governments around the world. Your peers will go on to do fairly great things, but that comes at a cost: LSE life really isn't an easygoing one. If being in an environment with super smart & driven people excites you, I'm sure you'll have a great time here! You'll make loads of friends, if you try. Big tips on making friends at the LSE - move into LSE only halls during first year & join a sports team. That will really help you make more friends.

Don't apologise! I'm happy to help.



Don't stress so much. The LSE is a tough place. It's a massive shock to most people.

Don't worry too much if you fail those 2 modules. I know people who have failed a module or two in first year, retaken the year & everything is fine. Just because you resit a couple of modules doesn't mean that you won't get a job or an internship. I know people who have got internships after retaking modules, yes.

If you fail one module, you may resit that module during your second year & not have to retake the year. If it's more than one, you will likely need to resit the year, but only the modules that you failed. One of my close friends did exactly that, he's technically in first year again & is actually interning at two different places this summer.

In general, as long as you get a 2:1 in your degree, corporates won't care if you resat a module or two. They've got bigger & more important things to be thinking about haha.
Thanks a lot for your sharing. I wonder what you mean by
"Your peers will go on to do fairly great things, but that comes at a cost: LSE life really isn't an easygoing one." Could you further elaborate on LSE life? How difficult is it? Do you know anyone who is an introvert but still find LSE enjoyable? Please advise.
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Anonymous #3
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Hi Londoncricket,
Actually some says that LSE's maths is not as good as Imperial's, is it the real case? If so, how much is LSE's maths worse than Imperial's? Many thanks
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londoncricket
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#19
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(Original post by sumboy)
Thanks a lot for your sharing. I wonder what you mean by
"Your peers will go on to do fairly great things, but that comes at a cost: LSE life really isn't an easygoing one." Could you further elaborate on LSE life? How difficult is it? Do you know anyone who is an introvert but still find LSE enjoyable? Please advise.
No worries.

Yeah so what I mean is that LSE students are ones to go far in life, either academically, or in the corporate world. But that's because they work hard, even during university & definitely afterwards too.

LSE life isn't easy, definitely during exams, but very fulfilling, I think. But that's just my opinion.

Loads of people at the LSE are introverts haha, in fact, some would say most. Definitely in the Department of Maths. Each person finds his / her group & area. Whether its a careers society, or helping professors with research & playing an active role in the department, each person finds their 'thing'.
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Anonymous #4
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This is a stupid question but how closely integrated is LSE with other unis, e.g. UCL? Do you have friends studying Econ at UCL? If so, how similar are the courses, opportunities, experiences, etc.? Thank you.
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