Would it be possible to complete 3 entire A levels in a year and get 3 A* ? Watch

lewis.h
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I want to do Maths, Biology and Chemistry.

I understand it'll be an 'absolute graft', but what does that actually mean, if anyone has done anything similar ?

I will probably be willing to start in the 3 month holiday you get after GCSEs if it would be possible for me to do it.

I want to get into medicine, and I feel like I could do a year of entirely just work experience after the intense year.

Thanks.
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999tigger
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(Original post by lewis.h)
I want to do Maths, Biology and Chemistry.

I understand it'll be an 'absolute graft', but what does that actually mean, if anyone has done anything similar ?

I will probably be willing to start in the 3 month holiday you get after GCSEs if it would be possible for me to do it.

I want to get into medicine, and I feel like I could do a year of entirely just work experience after the intense year.

Thanks.
Yes.

Are you self teaching and are you incredibly clever?
Will you be being tutored?
Why are you in such a rush?
What GCSE are you expecting?


Would I put money on you doing it? No.
Do I think it is a good plan? No. Pretty dumb imo. Your life and your A levels though.
Do I think you are being unrealistic? Almost certainly.
Why would you want to do a years worth of work experience at the expense of A level?
Have you researched how the application process works?
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HamzaD
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Yes.

Are you self teaching and are you incredibly clever?
Will you be being tutored?
Why are you in such a rush?
What GCSE are you expecting?


Would I put money on you doing it? No.
Do I think it is a good plan? No. Pretty dumb imo. Your life and your A levels though.
Do I think you are being unrealistic? Almost certainly.
Why would you want to do a years worth of work experience at the expense of A level?
Have you researched how the application process works?
No he is being realistic, there is a difference between you and him, 999tigger does not believe in themselves whereas lewis.h does. Do what makes you feel happy. Don't be discouraged by people like 999tigger.
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999tigger
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(Original post by HamzaD)
No he is being realistic, there is a difference between you and him, 999tigger does not believe in themselves whereas lewis.h does. Do what makes you feel happy. Don't be discouraged by people like 999tigger.
How is he being realistic? He hasnt told us anything about himself so we know what his academic record is? If it was that easy then everyone would do it.

What I am is honest and realistic. Clearly you prefer unrealistic and deluded. I've already said its up to them.

How were your A levels? Have they made you happy?
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lewis.h
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I do self teach a lot, and I could always retake.

If you're recommended to do 3 hours a day for A levels in the week and 5 on the weekend days, then that would basically mean doing 5 hours a day in the week and then 12 hours on the weekend days. Or just doing 6 hours a day on the weekdays, which considering you have a lot of frees so often finish at about mid day for study leave, could potentially work.

Though, it's hard to say unless it's been done.

(Original post by 999tigger)
Yes.

Are you self teaching and are you incredibly clever?
Will you be being tutored?
Why are you in such a rush?
What GCSE are you expecting?


Would I put money on you doing it? No.
Do I think it is a good plan? No. Pretty dumb imo. Your life and your A levels though.
Do I think you are being unrealistic? Almost certainly.
Why would you want to do a years worth of work experience at the expense of A level?
Have you researched how the application process works?
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user2809
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Yes, two years is way too long for A-Levels (and GCSEs for that matter) and one year is more than enough time to do even four A-Levels at A* standard.
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999tigger
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(Original post by lewis.h)
I do self teach a lot, and I could always retake.

If you're recommended to do 3 hours a day for A levels in the week and 5 on the weekend days, then that would basically mean doing 5 hours a day in the week and then 12 hours on the weekend days. Or just doing 6 hours a day on the weekdays, which considering you have a lot of frees so often finish at about mid day for study leave, could potentially work.

Though, it's hard to say unless it's been done.
You need to provide more information about your plan and your age. You expect to homeschool these, teach self and be a private candidate?
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HamzaD
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(Original post by 999tigger)
How is he being realistic? He hasnt told us anything about himself so we know what his academic record is? If it was that easy then everyone would do it.

What I am is honest and realistic. Clearly you prefer unrealistic and deluded. I've already said its up to them.

How were your A levels? Have they made you happy?
(Original post by 999tigger)
You need to provide more information about your plan and your age. You expect to homeschool these, teach self and be a private candidate?
nobody cares about age, plans etc. People can retake as many times as they like, but still end up in a degree they are happy with. 999tiger just be quiet you are not making any sense.
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999tigger
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(Original post by HamzaD)
nobody cares about age, plans etc. People can retake as many times as they like, but still end up in a degree they are happy with. 999tiger just be quiet you are not making any sense.
You are just showing your own ignorance because he is applying for Medicine and many unis care very much about grades and resits.

You are the one who is unable to provide any rational reasons, whereas I can explain why all the information I mentions is relevant. You should stick to trying to finish your exams on timer. If you hadnt noticed you have the same time as everyone else, unless you have special circumstances.
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RedGiant
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Yes easily. If you put your mind to it, and skip a lot of the pointless stuff that isn’t relevant to the spec, then it can be easily done with consistent work. Learn the content, buy the revision guides and do past papers up to exams.

That being said, should you? No, probably not.
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sotor
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(Original post by lewis.h)
I do self teach a lot, and I could always retake.

If you're recommended to do 3 hours a day for A levels in the week and 5 on the weekend days, then that would basically mean doing 5 hours a day in the week and then 12 hours on the weekend days. Or just doing 6 hours a day on the weekdays, which considering you have a lot of frees so often finish at about mid day for study leave, could potentially work.

Though, it's hard to say unless it's been done.
a lot of universities don't accept resits for medicine. why do you want to do it in a year?

you don't need a years worth of work experience for medicine and it can easily be done alongside a levels. about 1-2 weeks of hospital work experience (if you can get it) plus something long term volunteering in the community (~6-9 months of weekly hospice/care home etc) and you'll be golden provided you can reflect on your experiences.

how old are you? you can't get onto a medicine course unless you'll be 18 before november the year you start (may differ between courses, this is what my university has said for 2019 entry)
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lewis.h
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(Original post by 999tigger)
You need to provide more information about your plan and your age. You expect to homeschool these, teach self and be a private candidate?
I'll turn 16 in the next month. I get grades 8s and 9s in the sciences and maths, but I have been revising since November. I've worked on many occasions until 3 in the morning, and on most days this year I have worked until an average of about half 1 in the morning, though admittedly, not all of it was productive study (particularly the most late sessions).

I've wanted to do A levels for a long time (since year 8 actually) which explains why I am in such a 'rush' to do them. Mainly because I've seen a lot of people who I know struggle a lot with them and I've always been curious as to whether I would fit that mould too.

I currently go to a state school, and I have planned to go to a grammar school for my A levels. Though, I understand very well that if I complete my A levels in one year, I'll have to self teach. I'll likely have access to a tutor in each subject, potentially multiple times a week for 2 hours on each occasion I see them if it's necessary. I'll likely have access to many online resources too, and am aware there are multiple youtube channels of A level teachers in each of the subject who provide videos to help students.
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essexgirlgilbert
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On that note, does that mean it is possible to do both a level biology and a level chemistry in a year? And if so what are good revision techniques
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MajorFader
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Yes.

Are you self teaching and are you incredibly clever?
Will you be being tutored?
Why are you in such a rush?
What GCSE are you expecting?


Would I put money on you doing it? No.
Do I think it is a good plan? No. Pretty dumb imo. Your life and your A levels though.
Do I think you are being unrealistic? Almost certainly.
Why would you want to do a years worth of work experience at the expense of A level?
Have you researched how the application process works?
Honestly this website doesn’t have enough of people like you. Thank you for giving your honest and true opinions all the time 👍🏾
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lewis.h
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I want to do it in a year, for a personal challenge and because I just don't want to delay it any longer - all I seem to hear from olders is how tough it is. I feel like I can work quite well with the pressure of time against me.
I've read a lot too that if you focus all of your efforts into something, and I mean ALL of them, into a few skills in a given time, you can become an expert at it- for example, there is a person called Asim Qureshi and his son is 14 (his daughter is 11 and did IGCSEs last year, getting A* in them) and has already done all of his A-levels based off of this principle; he studied the entire A-level 5 months prior every day for around 3/4 hours and got an A*, meanwhile he studies 4 hours of coding a day, and he did this by homeschooling, - I believe he was just a slightly above average kid before this..

He now has the time to focus on other things and discover new interest. I feel I may be capable of achieving the same as he has, but with 3 A-levels over around 3x the amount of time he has had. He got 10 hours of sleep a day, and I could get 9. I can then focus on discovering more about myself in the year after A-levels are done.

But loads of people seem to have done this.
(Original post by sotor)
a lot of universities don't accept resits for medicine. why do you want to do it in a year?

you don't need a years worth of work experience for medicine and it can easily be done alongside a levels. about 1-2 weeks of hospital work experience (if you can get it) plus something long term volunteering in the community (~6-9 months of weekly hospice/care home etc) and you'll be golden provided you can reflect on your experiences.

how old are you? you can't get onto a medicine course unless you'll be 18 before november the year you start (may differ between courses, this is what my university has said for 2019 entry)
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Sinnoh
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So it seems the reason you're doing this is specifically to get that year of work experience (because you can't start until you're 18 anyway) but it's just not necessary.
Find time during the school holidays and see if there are relevant activities you could do during term time. You'll have more time to get the grades you want and you won't put your application in jeopardy by not getting one of your grades up to standard (because they often require you to have sat all your subjects at the same time).
That and you won't be having to relentlessly bang out in one year just to go to uni at the same time as everyone else.

(Original post by essexgirlgilbert)
On that note, does that mean it is possible to do both a level biology and a level chemistry in a year? And if so what are good revision techniques
Doing as many practice questions as you can find, doing past papers and marking your work to find your weak areas and spaced revision, testing yourself more frequently as the exam approaches.
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win011
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A posse ad esse
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blackvoid17
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Honestly I wouldn't risk it. You're taking relatively hard subjects and on top of that you will have to revise for the BMAT/UKCAT and practise for interviews. With something like medicine its best to get good grades first time (depending on which uni you go to) instead of rushing it and getting grades you aren't happy with. You can still get lots of work experience across 2 years while doing your a levels.
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OctoberRain7
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It is possible, but extremely unlikely and I would not recommend it. It’s pretty unlikely that you will get 3 A*s in two years, never mind one. I guess you can start trying to do your A levels in a year and move the exams back a year if (when) you find it difficult to cover the course to that standard. I don’t get why you can’t study at the same time as doing work experience, a whole year of work experience is excessive anyway
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the_queen
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(Original post by lewis.h)
I want to do Maths, Biology and Chemistry.

I understand it'll be an 'absolute graft', but what does that actually mean, if anyone has done anything similar ?

I will probably be willing to start in the 3 month holiday you get after GCSEs if it would be possible for me to do it.

I want to get into medicine, and I feel like I could do a year of entirely just work experience after the intense year.

Thanks.
it will be hard!

Plus, for sciences you must pass practicals. Biology A Level is very hard, boring and endless memorizing.
Very important, note that medical schools ask to take .A Levels at the end of 2 years of study and do not accept early exams. and resits.
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