luckyangel_.x
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What potential career choices can I do by taking Spanish at A-levels. At the moment, I don’t really know what I want to be. But I just love Spanish and I really want to take it further and learn it fluently. By doing it at A-level, I thought it would help greatly.

I also love Maths and Chemistry/Biology. So, I might choose those subjects aswell. I know that Spanish isn’t related to those subjects and they don’t really go well together. But I really want to take it further. I just wanted to know what sort of career choices I can go into by choosing these subjects for A-Levels.

Could I still go into medicine with these subjects? Also, is choosing Spanish a waste of a subject, as you can only take 3-4 subjects for A-level?

Thank you!
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Quick-use
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(Original post by luckyangel_.x)
What potential career choices can I do by taking Spanish at A-levels. At the moment, I don’t really know what I want to be. But I just love Spanish and I really want to take it further and learn it fluently. By doing it at A-level, I thought it would help greatly.

I also love Maths and Chemistry/Biology. So, I might choose those subjects aswell. I know that Spanish isn’t related to those subjects and they don’t really go well together. But I really want to take it further. I just wanted to know what sort of career choices I can go into by choosing these subjects for A-Levels.

Could I still go into medicine with these subjects? Also, is choosing Spanish a waste of a subject, as you can only take 3-4 subjects for A-level?

Thank you!
Finally, a linguist!

I know you're not asking about doing languages at university, but I'll share my experiences.

At university, I did French, Spanish and Japanese. After graduating, I did some freelance interpreting in Japan while working at a private firm assisting medical and business clients with English translation. Now, I'm back to studying in the UK and am applying for postgraduate courses in International Relations with the hope of applying for the British diplomatic service.

My friends who did a Japanese degree have gone onto the following jobs: working in immigration offices in Japan, working in local Japanese governments such as Fukushima, Beppu and Kyoto (one such example: https://rediscoverfukushima.com/), working at the consulate general (embassy) in Edinburgh, working for the NHK (Japan's version of BBC) in both Tokyo and London, investment banking, working in Japanese translation (environmental and video games), practicing Law in Japan, working at a local sake brewery (https://www.originsake.com/?fbclid=I...0neClapyuUuqyY), lecturing at universities in Japan and the UK and so on and so forth.

My university friends who studied French and Spanish have gone onto working at the European Parliament, investment banking, tourism and so on.

When you study a languages degree, you don't just study the language. For example, during my undergraduate degree I took various modules on Japan-China foreign policy, international relations, economics, politics, French immigration laws, Spanish journalism writing etc. What's more, regarding the language component of our degrees, there were modules consisting of translations of dense political documents, medical documents, historical religious documents, both classical and contemporary literary texts as well as journalistic articles among many others.

I also have many friends who didn't study languages at university but stuff like Medicine or Economics and they pursued languages in their spare time. For example, a friend of mine who did a Medicine degree did French all throughout high school and then started learning Japanese at university. He was able to actually go to Japan for 2 months as part of his medical degree.

Languages are excellent for the skills they provide - they're a mix of so many disciplines. Even if you don't pursue Spanish after A level, the skill will stay with you forever. You may become rusty one day, but it'll be so much easier to pick it up again than start from scratch.

For Medicine, the only 2 subjects at A level you really need are Biology and Chemistry. After that, you can do whatever you want. Universities don't mind as long as you have the required subjects (Bio and Chem) and you have excellent grades.
Last edited by Quick-use; 8 months ago
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