Going vegan in a meat eating family?

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ChicaDelTeatro
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I want to go vegan but my family are all meat-eaters. One is unsupportive, one is very supportive and one is ambiguous (primary meal-maker, supportive of my choice but concerned too much extra work will be made & that I won't get enough vitamins & nutrients.) What would be some ways I can convince them that I will be just as healthy following a vegan diet as I was when I ate meat?
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Hannah1903
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Maybe don’t rush into it all at once? Start going vegan bit by bit to show that even as you lose some of the things you won’t eat you’re still healthy in the process. Not sure if my wording makes sense at all
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takerpot
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(Original post by ChicaDelTeatro)
I want to go vegan but my family are all meat-eaters. One is unsupportive, one is very supportive and one is ambiguous (primary meal-maker, supportive of my choice but concerned too much extra work will be made & that I won't get enough vitamins & nutrients.) What would be some ways I can convince them that I will be just as healthy following a vegan diet as I was when I ate meat?
Tell the unsupportive one to go **** themselves.
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Anonymous1502
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I am vegan since January, there are plenty of studies to back up veganism even the NHS claims that a vegan diet is healthy for any stage of life:
https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/the-vegan-diet/

It is easy as long as you know what you are doing.I hate people who always blame vegan diet if something goes wrong yet there are plenty of obese, sick people who follow the non vegan diet yet people don't hate on the non vegan diet.I take iron and B12 supplements just in case.There are plenty of vegan you tubers out there to provide guidance:

Goji man-Vegan nutritionist
Madeleine Olivia-Recipe ideas
Pick up limes-Recipe ideas
Crazy healthy cool-Nutritionist
Those vegan guys-interesting videos
Hench herbivore-vegan bodybuilder

Make sure you stock up on beans, fruit, veg and carbohydrates.I would recommend also stocking up on various nuts.Porridge is an amazing way to start your way it can be quite tasty but you need to know how to make it properly in my experience.It is also incredibly versatile.On a vegan diet you can still eat what non vegans eat but the vegan version.I promise you that is true.The mock meats are quite good and there is plenty of vegan ice cream (Swedish glace is really good and not expensive also Alpo).The milk alternatives are plentiful (I like soya the most).You can still enjoy pizza and other favourites.As for chocolate (vego, Ritter sport marzipan and other brands).

My grandma still has the audacity to call me when she hears of some flaky vegan becoming unwell.You can become unwell on any diet if you don't have a balanced diet.But the reason why I chose the vegan diet is because the lives of animals are more important to me than my taste buds.Please feel free to ask any questions if you have any.
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ChicaDelTeatro
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(Original post by Hannah1903)
Maybe don’t rush into it all at once? Start going vegan bit by bit to show that even as you lose some of the things you won’t eat you’re still healthy in the process. Not sure if my wording makes sense at all
Thanks - that's really helpful. Our family as a whole are switching to oat milk (we tried a bunch & it was our family favourite) so that was Step 1.
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ChicaDelTeatro
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
I am vegan since January, there are plenty of studies to back up veganism even the NHS claims that a vegan diet is healthy for any stage of life:
https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/the-vegan-diet/

It is easy as long as you know what you are doing.I hate people who always blame vegan diet if something goes wrong yet there are plenty of obese, sick people who follow the non vegan diet yet people don't hate on the non vegan diet. I take iron and B12 supplements just in case.There are plenty of vegan you tubers out there to provide guidance:

Goji man-Vegan nutritionist
Madeleine Olivia-Recipe ideas
Pick up limes-Recipe ideas
Crazy healthy cool-Nutritionist
Those vegan guys-interesting videos
Hench herbivore-vegan bodybuilder

Make sure you stock up on beans, fruit, veg and carbohydrates.I would recommend also stocking up on various nuts.Porridge is an amazing way to start your way it can be quite tasty but you need to know how to make it properly in my experience.It is also incredibly versatile.On a vegan diet you can still eat what non vegans eat but the vegan version.I promise you that is true.The mock meats are quite good and there is plenty of vegan ice cream (Swedish glace is really good and not expensive also Alpo).The milk alternatives are plentiful (I like soya the most).You can still enjoy pizza and other favourites.As for chocolate (vego, Ritter sport marzipan and other brands).

My grandma still has the audacity to call me when she hears of some flaky vegan becoming unwell.You can become unwell on any diet if you don't have a balanced diet.But the reason why I chose the vegan diet is because the lives of animals are more important to me than my taste buds.Please feel free to ask any questions if you have any.
Thank you for being so helpful - I was not expecting much tbh. I will dm you and ask about a bunch of things (sorry if it's a weird time for you, it's 5am here)
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by ChicaDelTeatro)
I want to go vegan but my family are all meat-eaters. One is unsupportive, one is very supportive and one is ambiguous (primary meal-maker, supportive of my choice but concerned too much extra work will be made & that I won't get enough vitamins & nutrients.) What would be some ways I can convince them that I will be just as healthy following a vegan diet as I was when I ate meat?
You will have to start cooking things yourself.

I have three kids. Two are vegetarian and one is vegan. The vegan does his own thing by and large. I am fed up to the back teeth of this faddy eating. Vegetarian i can cope with but i wont do vegan purely because it is a lifestyle choice I don't agree with.
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myst451
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1) first thing to do is switch off dairy. Buy some plant milk/alpro soya yoghurt and try to cook with oil instead of butter. (there are butter alternatives but they dont always stop sticking).

2) Do you cook? If so, make a few meals over the weekends in big batches and freeze in individual portions. That way you can help the person who usually cooks your food out.

3) You may be hungry. Vegan diets can be healthier but this is not always the case (you could live off chicken and mushroom pot noodles and still surprisingly be vegan). However, eating a mainly plant based diet and cooking from scratch will ensure you get enough vitamins although plants are less calorie dense so you will probably need to eat more to feel full. Having said that, I recommend you supplement B12 and that your whole family supplements vitamin D in the winter months. You may also need to supplement iron/calcium but this is not always an issue. Protein deficiency in vegans is effectively a myth.

4) eat a good breakfast. If you have fortified cereal, that could make up nearly half of your recommended intake for Iron and B vitamins. If you prefer oats, top them with nuts and fruit and use fortified plant milk to get some calcium, B12 and Iron. If you are vegan, breakfast is literally the most important meal of the day.

5) question your choice. I am not vegan but I have been in the past for environmental reasons. I am no longer fully vegan (although I don't really eat meat more than once a week, i dont eat dairy or honey and I eat eggs roughly once a week as well). I concluded that outright veganism is unnecessary and unfortunately quite antisocial, especially if you come from a classic meat-and-two-veg family and decided to seriously restrict rather than completely cut out animal products.

6) you seem to focus on food; consider cosmetics as well - they are harder to find than you think.

7) try and find a vegan meal your whole family enjoys. Make it a family occasion and buy some vegan cookbooks
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Leviathan1611
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make you own meals for a start
ignore the unsupportive one, they're not the ones eating it
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ChicaDelTeatro
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(Original post by myst451)
1) first thing to do is switch off dairy. Buy some plant milk/alpro soya yoghurt and try to cook with oil instead of butter. (there are butter alternatives but they dont always stop sticking).

2) Do you cook? If so, make a few meals over the weekends in big batches and freeze in individual portions. That way you can help the person who usually cooks your food out.

3) You may be hungry. Vegan diets can be healthier but this is not always the case (you could live off chicken and mushroom pot noodles and still surprisingly be vegan). However, eating a mainly plant based diet and cooking from scratch will ensure you get enough vitamins although plants are less calorie dense so you will probably need to eat more to feel full. Having said that, I recommend you supplement B12 and that your whole family supplements vitamin D in the winter months. You may also need to supplement iron/calcium but this is not always an issue. Protein deficiency in vegans is effectively a myth.

4) eat a good breakfast. If you have fortified cereal, that could make up nearly half of your recommended intake for Iron and B vitamins. If you prefer oats, top them with nuts and fruit and use fortified plant milk to get some calcium, B12 and Iron. If you are vegan, breakfast is literally the most important meal of the day.

5) question your choice. I am not vegan but I have been in the past for environmental reasons. I am no longer fully vegan (although I don't really eat meat more than once a week, i dont eat dairy or honey and I eat eggs roughly once a week as well). I concluded that outright veganism is unnecessary and unfortunately quite antisocial, especially if you come from a classic meat-and-two-veg family and decided to seriously restrict rather than completely cut out animal products.

6) you seem to focus on food; consider cosmetics as well - they are harder to find than you think.

7) try and find a vegan meal your whole family enjoys. Make it a family occasion and buy some vegan cookbooks
1) My whole family use oat milk - we never liked dairy milk's weird aftertaste.
2) I am planning on taking responsibility for my cooking as soon as I make the transition. Great tips, thanks!
3) Thanks for the heads-up! I heard somewhere that not all D-Vitamins are vegan - do you know anymore about that?
4) My usual breakfast is overnight oats with oat milk and fresh fruit - I'll add in the nuts, that's really good advice!
5) My family is very mixed - mum is pro veganism but eats mostly vegetarian, I'm going vegan, my brother and father eat meat but are indifferent to my choice. I have questioned my choice and I disagree with meat & dairy production, don't like honey and am indifferent to eggs, so I feel the only way to embrace my values is to go vegan.
6) I'm allergic to almost all cosmetics so I never really wear them.
7) Will do!
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chelseadagg3r
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(Original post by ChicaDelTeatro)
I want to go vegan but my family are all meat-eaters. One is unsupportive, one is very supportive and one is ambiguous (primary meal-maker, supportive of my choice but concerned too much extra work will be made & that I won't get enough vitamins & nutrients.) What would be some ways I can convince them that I will be just as healthy following a vegan diet as I was when I ate meat?
Do it gradually and learn to cook for yourself. Help out a bit in the kitchen and your family will probably be much less bothered about it because it will affect them less. Everyone in my family eats meat and there were a few concerns about how healthy it was, but because I cooked for myself no one really cared
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ChicaDelTeatro
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@chelseadagg3r , thanks so much!
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chelseadagg3r
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(Original post by ChicaDelTeatro)
1) My whole family use oat milk - we never liked dairy milk's weird aftertaste.
2) I am planning on taking responsibility for my cooking as soon as I make the transition. Great tips, thanks!
3) Thanks for the heads-up! I heard somewhere that not all D-Vitamins are vegan - do you know anymore about that?
4) My usual breakfast is overnight oats with oat milk and fresh fruit - I'll add in the nuts, that's really good advice!
5) My family is very mixed - mum is pro veganism but eats mostly vegetarian, I'm going vegan, my brother and father eat meat but are indifferent to my choice. I have questioned my choice and I disagree with meat & dairy production, don't like honey and am indifferent to eggs, so I feel the only way to embrace my values is to go vegan.
6) I'm allergic to almost all cosmetics so I never really wear them.
7) Will do!
For me vitamins and things like colours in foods caught me out a lot in the beginning. You will make mistakes and it's fine. We all do. If something contains vitamin D but isn't labelled vegan, chances are it's D3 which may be derived from sheep wool (thought not always, but it's the more common one as far as I'm aware). You can read more about it here: https://www.vegansociety.com/resourc...ents/vitamin-d If you are worried about vitamin and mineral intake you can take supplements. There's lots of vegan friendly ones
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SlightlySummer
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Defo take small steps, and make sure you have supplements.
When I became Vegetarian I cut meat and chicken out straight away and I did get ill.
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xxx0xxxo
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(Original post by ChicaDelTeatro)
I want to go vegan but my family are all meat-eaters. One is unsupportive, one is very supportive and one is ambiguous (primary meal-maker, supportive of my choice but concerned too much extra work will be made & that I won't get enough vitamins & nutrients.) What would be some ways I can convince them that I will be just as healthy following a vegan diet as I was when I ate meat?
My sister is a vegan, I'm vegetarian, parents are meat-eaters, dad really hostile towards her veganism. Best thing is take control of your own meals most of the time, give your mum direct simple recipes or something interesting everyone might enjoy. I think you will have to be involved in your diet as your ethics are the root and as such is a personal responsibility, you'll have to accept if others aren't supportive.. My sis got excited and experimented a lot with recipes, i enjoyed trying them. While there are a lot of Vegan substitutes for things, just be aware of how processed they are, or even destructive, read about the Almond milk industry, lots of people are crazy about it unfortunately it is not that ethical to consume often. Be critical
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myst451
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(Original post by ChicaDelTeatro)
1) My whole family use oat milk - we never liked dairy milk's weird aftertaste.
2) I am planning on taking responsibility for my cooking as soon as I make the transition. Great tips, thanks!
3) Thanks for the heads-up! I heard somewhere that not all D-Vitamins are vegan - do you know anymore about that?
4) My usual breakfast is overnight oats with oat milk and fresh fruit - I'll add in the nuts, that's really good advice!
5) My family is very mixed - mum is pro veganism but eats mostly vegetarian, I'm going vegan, my brother and father eat meat but are indifferent to my choice. I have questioned my choice and I disagree with meat & dairy production, don't like honey and am indifferent to eggs, so I feel the only way to embrace my values is to go vegan.
6) I'm allergic to almost all cosmetics so I never really wear them.
7) Will do!
Yeah oat milk is my favourite too! About the D vitamins; D3 is a form of vitamin D that is plant-based but many of the others are not so stick to D3 only. You should be able to find a supplement that's vegan but if not mushrooms and tofu (if you like it) are full of it - and of course sunlight. Your breakfast sounds rlly good btw and glad your family are supportive - go ahead and embrace your values! Probably the first time you've ever heard this but it is convenient that you don't wear many cosmetics. However, even stuff like conditioner can be a bit suspect (some contain casein which comes from milk) so be careful.
Veganism is technically a lifestyle, not just a diet but don't let people put you down if you mess up and accidentally use the wrong lip balm or whatever. Always remember that it is your choice, and the person who has to live with it is you so take it as far as you want to go. It's all about your own personal values but you seem to get that so I think you'll do really well.
Best of luck
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ChicaDelTeatro
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(Original post by myst451)
Yeah oat milk is my favourite too! About the D vitamins; D3 is a form of vitamin D that is plant-based but many of the others are not so stick to D3 only. You should be able to find a supplement that's vegan but if not mushrooms and tofu (if you like it) are full of it - and of course sunlight. Your breakfast sounds rlly good btw and glad your family are supportive - go ahead and embrace your values! Probably the first time you've ever heard this but it is convenient that you don't wear many cosmetics. However, even stuff like conditioner can be a bit suspect (some contain casein which comes from milk) so be careful.
Veganism is technically a lifestyle, not just a diet but don't let people put you down if you mess up and accidentally use the wrong lip balm or whatever. Always remember that it is your choice, and the person who has to live with it is you so take it as far as you want to go. It's all about your own personal values but you seem to get that so I think you'll do really well.
Best of luck
Thank you so much!
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username4626084
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Cook your own food. Or get a new vegan family. dat’s simple man.
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