Should Jeremy Corbyn Resign? Watch

Arran90
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In the 2009 Euro Elections (with Gordon Brown as PM) Labour were given a bloody nose.

2,381,760 votes or 15.2%
13MEPs (down from 19)
Failed to elect an MEP for the South West England region.

This time they have had their nose punched even harder.

2,347,255 votes or 14.1%
10MEPs (down from 20)
Failed to elect an MEP for the South West England, East of England, and Scotland regions.

Therefore, in the light of these results should Jeremy Corbyn resign along with Theresa May?

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Napp
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May has defenestrated herself nicely and Corbyn simply has to wait for the Tories to follow her out of said window like lemmings. The question is not whether he should resign but of when will he deliver the coup de grace (for better or worse).
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username8408717
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Well let's see if his stance changes and whether he will now fully support a second referendum over a general election.

If he does that then he can stay.

If he doesn't then he should get the boot.
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Zarek
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Not really since Brexit is a surreal issue that splits both left and right equally and where facts and their grasp of them are non existent. As the person in charge of the current shambles Teresa May had to go though.
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Arran90
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(Original post by _thestudent33)
Well let's see if his stance changes and whether he will now fully support a second referendum over a general election.
Should Remain be an option or should it be the choice of a deal?

The Euro Election is in effect a proxy second referendum. Like the first, it's close call in terms of the popular vote between Leave (Brexit Party, UKIP) and Remain (Lib-Dems, Green, Change UK, PC, SNP).

A third play on the same polarised theme may not be a sensible suggestion.
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CrazyConnor
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Yes, everyone should resign. Forget modern politics, lets go back to a tribal system. It'll make it much more fun, while massively increasing my chances of dying young so I don't see a downside.
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Napp
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(Original post by Arran90)
Should Remain be an option or should it be the choice of a deal?

The Euro Election is in effect a proxy second referendum. Like the first, it's close call in terms of the popular vote between Leave (Brexit Party, UKIP) and Remain (Lib-Dems, Green, Change UK, PC, SNP).

A third play on the same polarised theme may not be a sensible suggestion.
How? it had a tiny turnout (as usual) its little better than local elections where no one cares or turns out bar the die hards. The only way to get an informative result is another referendum (an honest one this time)
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username8408717
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(Original post by Arran90)
Should Remain be an option or should it be the choice of a deal?

The Euro Election is in effect a proxy second referendum. Like the first, it's close call in terms of the popular vote between Leave (Brexit Party, UKIP) and Remain (Lib-Dems, Green, Change UK, PC, SNP).

A third play on the same polarised theme may not be a sensible suggestion.
Remain/Deal/No Deal.

If the first referendum had all three choices then it would've been simpler to carry out the proceedings. Because it didn't we are were we are and the best thing to do is stay in.
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Arran90
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(Original post by _thestudent33)
Remain/Deal/No Deal.

If the first referendum had all three choices then it would've been simpler to carry out the proceedings. Because it didn't we are were we are and the best thing to do is stay in.
This could result in the Brexit Party winning the next general election, judging by the Euro Election results.

Remember that you have to have over 50% of the vote to win a referendum but you can win a general election on less than 50% of the vote. Look what happened in Scotland with the 45%.
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username8408717
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(Original post by Arran90)
This could result in the Brexit Party winning the next general election, judging by the Euro Election results.

Remember that you have to have over 50% of the vote to win a referendum but you can win a general election on less than 50% of the vote. Look what happened in Scotland with the 45%.
Yeah but Labour are split over a second ref so even if they win the GE nothings gonna change. We are probably still gonna exit but under less harsh terms
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Neilos
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Would be good if he did, so Labour could perhaps form themselves into something I might want to vote for again.
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Kinyonga
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(Original post by Napp)
May has defenestrated herself nicely and Corbyn simply has to wait for the Tories to follow her out of said window like lemmings. The question is not whether he should resign but of when will he deliver the coup de grace (for better or worse).
"Defenestrated". Love that word.
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Arran90
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If the Labour Party had achieved this year's result in previous Euro Elections then there would be much pressure on their leader to resign.

Under the old FPTP system they would have elected 4 MEPs.
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L i b
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Corbyn continually loses Labour elections when any competent leader of the opposition should be capitalising on the Government's many woes. Theresa May was awful, and yet Labour looked considerably worse to the electorate.

He should not only go, he should take his rag-bag of trots, antisemites, communists, conspiracy theorists, kooks and losers with him.
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fallen_acorns
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(Original post by Napp)
May has defenestrated herself nicely and Corbyn simply has to wait for the Tories to follow her out of said window like lemmings. The question is not whether he should resign but of when will he deliver the coup de grace (for better or worse).
the problem with that is the surge of support for greens/lib dems since the 2017 election. If we were in an american system with only two parties then yes, he should keep on waiting and being patient - let the torries destroy them selves as they have been doing quite successfully.

But his indecisiveness and inability to take a clear stance is now leading to labour hemoraging votes to the other two left-wing parties, and potentially setting things up for an election where we have both a divided left and a divided right.

Which ever party can unify their 'side' first will win the next election, and corbyn could do that in a heartbeat if backed a second referendum. As long as he refuses to fully get behind one though, his 'coup' will likely never happen in my eyes.
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DSilva
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
the problem with that is the surge of support for greens/lib dems since the 2017 election. If we were in an american system with only two parties then yes, he should keep on waiting and being patient - let the torries destroy them selves as they have been doing quite successfully.

But his indecisiveness and inability to take a clear stance is now leading to labour hemoraging votes to the other two left-wing parties, and potentially setting things up for an election where we have both a divided left and a divided right.

Which ever party can unify their 'side' first will win the next election, and corbyn could do that in a heartbeat if backed a second referendum. As long as he refuses to fully get behind one though, his 'coup' will likely never happen in my eyes.
He's in an impossible situation. If he backs a second referendum, he can wave goodbye to scores of seats up north.

The problem is not the Labour leader, the problem is that the electorate is becoming increasingly and seemingly irreversibly polarised.
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Arran90
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Labour has an advantage of having a sizeable 'captive' vote base who will vote for the party rain or shine, often out of ingrained habit or because the rest of their family are voting. The exact size of this 'captive' vote base is unknown but it's anecdotal evidence over the years points to it being larger than the vote base of Tory 'loyalists'. Labour might have lost a large swathe of pro-EU supporters to the Green Party and the Lib-Dems, and anti-EU supporters to the Brexit Party, over ambiguity and the failure to take a clear stance on Brexit, but not everybody holds a strong opinion on whether or not Britain should be a member of the EU, and there are a sizeable fraction of voters with a don't know, don't care, don't mind stance on Brexit.

I provided a detailed list of the local authorities where Labour came first but nobody has yet commented on it.

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5970002

The Labour voteshare shows huge variation ranging from Newham where 51.0% voted Labour to Croydon where just a mere 23.3% voted Labour.

In Greater London all apart from Barking & Dagenham voted Remain in the EU Referendum but out in the English regions the majority voted Leave.

Not one of these local authorities were in the North East and neither were any in South Yorkshire - The Brexit Party came first in all of these local authorities - which historically contained inpenetrable Labour bastions.

Sheffield exhibited a truly polarised result with 28.1% voting for the Brexit Party and 24.8% voting for the Green Party. Trailing this was the Lib-Dems on 18.1%, Labour on 17.0%, UKIP on 3.9%, and Conservative on 3.4%.

Could we conclude that the bulk of the 17.0% who voted Labour fit into the don't know, don't care, don't mind category?

Let's assume that Labour wishes to double it's voteshare to 34.0% as that would, under FPTP, likely to be sufficient to guarantee a victory. Should they try and win another 17.0% from the Brexit Party or from the Green Party? It's a difficult dilemma.
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fallen_acorns
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(Original post by DSilva)
He's in an impossible situation. If he backs a second referendum, he can wave goodbye to scores of seats up north.

The problem is not the Labour leader, the problem is that the electorate is becoming increasingly and seemingly irreversibly polarised.
I disagree that his situation is impossible - I think it was two years ago, when he correctly backed the result of the referendum, but since then the remain voters have grown in number and solidified themselves into the biggest single voting block, and if Boris or someoen simmilar takes over, then I think the situation will look very different to how it did two years ago. I've not checked the numbers, but look at all of the conservative seats being lost to the lib dems currently, they are all your middle-class soft-tory voting areas, who are now backing remain over anything else. For me, yes labour will loose a lot of working-class leave areas, but they will gain a lot of middle-class seats that were previously soft-tory.

The worry, for me (were I a labour voter) would be, where is your voting base come the next election? If the torries push for a hard brexit, they will mop up the 30+% of voters who are protesting by voting for Nigels new party, as well as keeping some of their base.. if the resurgent lib-dems are riding the wave of remain, as the only major party backing staying in.. then where does that leave labour? For anyone whose core priority is brexit, labour are a confusing middling choice that doesn't make a lot of sense. Obviously they will still pick up votes because its not only about brexit and people will still vote tribally, but the situation has changed so much since 2017, that I can't see any party winning, unless they pick a side on brexit and go for it. The middle-ground has been resoundly rejected multiple times now, and exactly as you say, they are becoming increasingly polarized - its time for labour and the torries to pick a side, or else they will keep facing rejection for parties that are actually willing to stick their necks out for what they believe in.
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Arran90
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(Original post by Napp)
How? it had a tiny turnout (as usual) its little better than local elections where no one cares or turns out bar the die hards. The only way to get an informative result is another referendum (an honest one this time)
How on earth can we hold an honest referendum unless:

1. Both the Conservative PM and cabinet ministers and the Labour leader and shadow cabinet ministers remain neutral and impartial and do not actively campaign either way during the run-up to the referendum.

2. There is no official campaign and the BBC remains neutral and impartial, although the print and the alternative media will be allowed to show bias either way but must not include high profile political figures from Labour and the Conservatives.

3. Mass immigration from EU countries is taken out of the equation.
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Napp
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(Original post by Arran90)
How on earth can we hold an honest referendum unless:

1. Both the Conservative PM and cabinet ministers and the Labour leader and shadow cabinet ministers remain neutral and impartial and do not actively campaign either way during the run-up to the referendum.

2. There is no official campaign and the BBC remains neutral and impartial, although the print and the alternative media will be allowed to show bias either way but must not include high profile political figures from Labour and the Conservatives.

3. Mass immigration from EU countries is taken out of the equation.
I’m sorry I’m not entirely sure what you’re asking me here?
The government is as divided as the country and can no longer be trusted. Same goes for the opposition.

The BBC does remain fair and impartial? They gave plenty of air time to both sides. There’s no way of getting the print media to though lest it then attempt to incite a revolution (although I’m all for having Murdoch and rothermere arrested for inciting sedition and undermining the nation).

I still feel people are using the so called mass eu immigration as a stalking horse to ban immigration from other countries... we all know which ones.
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