Did Brexit win the Euro Elections?

Watch
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Brexit got the most seats, but did they win?

The aim of Farage's Brexit organisation (they aren't a membership party, candidates were selected by Farage and many of the elected Brexit Party MEPs have wildly differing political views) was to sweep the board and demand control of the Brexit agenda.

He's already claimed the latter but will be ignored by the government on a practical level, although of course the results have put the Tory party in Parliament into a complete spin.

The media have also heavily promoted this as a Hard Brexit win.

Yet in reality, Remain won.

Remain parties got more votes and more seats. The Brexit Party inherited the UKIP vote plus some disaffected Tory and Labour voters. UKIP was 24% down and Brexit got 32%. So they managed to get 8% from the other parties.

The LidDems and Greens alone got 32% on solidly Remain platforms - more than the Brexit Party got.

Add in the SNP and UKIP and Remain is still ahead.

The media are totally misrepresenting the outcome of this vote. It was a clear win for Remain.
2
reply
Andrew97
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
The media have portrayed it as a hard Brexit win. Rubbish.

The Brexit party clearly won the election. Remain didn’t.
3
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Andrew97)
The media have portrayed it as a hard Brexit win. Rubbish.

The Brexit party clearly won the election. Remain didn’t.
Remain parties got a higher number of votes than BP. So how does that work?

If you look at the downward swings for Tory and Labour (cumulative 26%) and BP got 30.5%, it would suggest the Brexiteers left the main parties and voted for BP. The people continuing to vote for the main parties are people who did not vote for Brexit in the first place, and are unlikely to support it today.
Last edited by Notoriety; 1 year ago
3
reply
Andrew97
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Notoriety)
Remain parties got a higher number of votes than BP. So how does that work?
The sum of the votes of 4 parties is higher than the total votes for 1 party doesn’t mean much.
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by Andrew97)
The sum of the votes of 4 parties is higher than the total votes for 1 party doesn’t mean much.
When all 3 parties have one clear message, it kinda does.
1
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by Andrew97)
The media have portrayed it as a hard Brexit win. Rubbish.
Which media do you watch/read?

The Telegraph this morning: "How Farage won his election victory".
The Mail yesterday: "Farage sweeps the board: electorate demand a hard Brexit".
Sky News ticker on election night: "Brexit party sweeping to victory".
0
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Andrew97)
The sum of the votes of 4 parties is higher than the total votes for 1 party doesn’t mean much.
Add all the Remain parties and all the Leave parties. Remain ended ahead.
1
reply
Andrew97
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Notoriety)
When all 3 parties have one clear message, it kinda does.
A clear message that only got 40% of the vote roughly. In reality it’s still 52-48 and nothing has changed.

(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Which media do you watch/read?

The Telegraph this morning: "How Farage won his election victory".
The Mail yesterday: "Farage sweeps the board: electorate demand a hard Brexit".
Sky News ticker on election night: "Brexit party sweeping to victory".
The telegraph and the mail would say that, appeal to their voter base. Sky news was correct. LBC had different presenters bringing this up (the sum of votes as well)
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by Andrew97)
A clear message that only got 40% of the vote roughly. In reality it’s still 52-48 and nothing has changed.
A simple agreement, the easiest there has ever been, has become a complete **** show with 2 extensions now and there is not a proposed deal that is gaining any clear support in Parliament. A lot has changed.
0
reply
Andrew97
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by Notoriety)
A simple agreement, the easiest there has ever been, has become a complete **** show with 2 extensions now and there is not a proposed deal that is gaining any clear support in Parliament. A lot has changed.
Nothing has changed in terms of how the country is divided rather than the actual process.
0
reply
maachu_pichuu
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
Remain would win a second referendum, Farage is dreading the prospect of brexit being toshed out. Young people want to remain and old people are dying, the UK is never leaving the EU now. In 2017 I thought it would be close, but now I see a solid 60-40 win for remain.
6
reply
Fullofsurprises
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by maachu_pichuu)
Remain would win a second referendum, Farage is dreading the prospect of brexit being toshed out. Young people want to remain and old people are dying, the UK is never leaving the EU now. In 2017 I thought it would be close, but now I see a solid 60-40 win for remain.
Agreed, this is why they are so desperate not to permit a second referendum.
1
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Andrew97)
Nothing has changed in terms of how the country is divided rather than the actual process.
I would suggest the difficulty of the process, now having been realised, would cause some people to change their minds.

To get back on track, all we know is that one party definitely in support of Brexit got 30.5%. Parties definitely not in support of Brexit got more than that. What the main parties are doing now is completely unknown.
0
reply
maachu_pichuu
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Agreed, this is why they are so desperate not to permit a second referendum.
I actually work in the elections (as a poll clerk and counting assistant- been doing it for 10 years now) and I was surprised at the surge in the green and lib dem vote. The lib dems are going to do VERY WELL in the next general election. I don't mind the lib dems, since they are a central party, what I don't like is far right or far left, as that distorts the economy.
1
reply
Andrew97
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by Notoriety)
I would suggest the difficulty of the process, now having been realised, would cause some people to change their minds.

To get back on track, all we know is that one party definitely in support of Brexit got 30.5%. Parties definitely not in support of Brexit got more than that. What the main parties are doing now is completely unknown.
I would add at least UKIP and the Tories to that (their official position is leave).

As I said it’s not as simple as adding up votes for both sides, you had lower turnout in leave supporting areas (there fault for not voting of course) and also the fact that I don’t think it’s reasonable to assume everybody you voted for remain (or leave for that matter) parties voted solely on their opinion of the EU. (I imaine the Greens, Labour and SNP would be an example of this)
0
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
Btexit-wise Neither side really won..

More people voted for parties that support leave then remain..
But more people voted for parties that want to remain then want a hard Brexit..

That's all you can draw from it

Indivially the Brexit part and farage won, and the Tories and ukip badly lost
1
reply
Arran90
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by maachu_pichuu)
The lib dems are going to do VERY WELL in the next general election.
The Lib-Dems are a one and a half issue party like UKIP was. Nobody knows what the Lib-Dems really stand for apart from cancelling Brexit. This Euro Election was really their trump card like Euro Elections in the last were UKIP's trump card.

How Lib-Dems perform in an election under FPTP fought on domestic issues remains to be seen. They could well be the biggest danger to Jeremy Corbyn in a future general election judging from the Euro Election result in Islington.
0
reply
Wōden
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by Notoriety)
Remain parties got a higher number of votes than BP. So how does that work?

If you look at the downward swings for Tory and Labour (cumulative 26%) and BP got 30.5%, it would suggest the Brexiteers left the main parties and voted for BP. The people continuing to vote for the main parties are people who did not vote for Brexit in the first place, and are unlikely to support it today.
Pure speculation and what-iffery, you don't know that at all. Even if we are to take the view that Brexit was the only issue in everybody's minds in this election, then I frankly don't see why any true remainer would vote for the Conservatives, a party who still hold an official 'leave' position, have no intention of ever holding a second referendum, and look highly unlikely to ever elect a pro-remain leader in the near future (all odds point to the opposite in fact).
0
reply
anarchism101
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
Neither Brexit nor Remain won per se. The purists on both sides beat the moderates. Hopes for consensus and compromise lost. In the short term, any deal is dead. The Tory leadership election will likely produce a winner who cannot hold a majority in the Commons, thus leading to a general election which will likely be a straight vote between No Deal and Full Revocation of Article 50. Hang on to your seats, this is going to be messy.
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by Wōden)
Pure speculation and what-iffery, you don't know that at all. Even if we are to take the view that Brexit was the only issue in everybody's minds in this election, then I frankly don't see why any true remainer would vote for the Conservatives, a party who still hold an official 'leave' position, have no intention of ever holding a second referendum, and look highly unlikely to ever elect a pro-remain leader in the near future (all odds point to the opposite in fact).
I would support the Tories as a remainer because they seem incapable of delivering Brexit and look to frustrate the entire process.

You also have the question, if we are to leave, who is the best party to manage a reasonable and smart Brexit? Prefer educated and experienced ministers to handle it than a bunch of councillors.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (54)
29.51%
No - I have already returned home (23)
12.57%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (42)
22.95%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (16)
8.74%
No - I live at home during term anyway (48)
26.23%

Watched Threads

View All