zakaz2
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Hey, I would really appreciate any help.

My question is whether when there is an offence committed and in result of this offence V develops a mental condition (e.g. depression) and decides to harm himself, is the chain of causation broken or not?
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Bitesizelaw
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I'm not an expert on tort, but I guess that you need to look at the law relating to remoteness of damage? The test was in The Wagon Mound when I studied tort, but that was a very, very long time ago.

Follow the Forum posting advice and you might get a better discussion from other students who are much more qualified than me in this area!
(Original post by zakaz2)
Hey, I would really appreciate any help.

My question is whether when there is an offence committed and in result of this offence V develops a mental condition (e.g. depression) and decides to harm himself, is the chain of causation broken or not?
Last edited by Bitesizelaw; 10 months ago
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RV3112
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(Original post by zakaz2)
Hey, I would really appreciate any help.

My question is whether when there is an offence committed and in result of this offence V develops a mental condition (e.g. depression) and decides to harm himself, is the chain of causation broken or not?
You need to provide a bit of background regarding this, as the question is a little too vague.

Presumably you are referring to Criminal law, so see R v. Dear (operating and substantial cause test)and R v. Roberts (was the victim's behaviour foreseeable), among many others.

On the off chance, you are referring to causation in Tort, something like Corr v. IBC Vehicles is a good starting point.
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MidgetFever
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Is this a criminal or tort question?
Chain of causation is treated differently in both.
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ath_
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I would say broken - certainly for criminal law purposes and almost certainly for tort.
(Original post by zakaz2)
Hey, I would really appreciate any help.

My question is whether when there is an offence committed and in result of this offence V develops a mental condition (e.g. depression) and decides to harm himself, is the chain of causation broken or not?
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