he3456
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One of the pillars of medical ethics is autonomy. This means that the patient has the right to make the decision and must agree, this also means the doctor can't impose treatment on an individual for any reason unless the patient is unable to decide themselves, so does this mean that the doctor can't be biased to one form of treatment than another?
If this is correct, then how far does it clash with beneficence which is to promote the course of action the doctor feels is in the patient's best interest? Since, how can you promote something or a treatment option whilst having to remain neutral as to allow the patient to make the decision without bias?
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ecolier
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(Original post by he3456)
One of the pillars of medical ethics is autonomy. This means that the patient has the right to make the decision and must agree, this also means the doctor can't impose treatment on an individual for any reason unless the patient is unable to decide themselves, so does this mean that the doctor can't be biased to one form of treatment than another?
Of course the doctor can be biased - they need to evaluate based on the effective of the treatment: the risks vs the benefits. There will never be 2 forms of treatment that will be exactly the same.

If this is correct, then how far does it clash with beneficence which is to promote the course of action the doctor feels is in the patient's best interest? Since, how can you promote something or a treatment option whilst having to remain neutral as to allow the patient to make the decision without bias?
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I think you have got some stuff misunderstood. Autonomy is the patient's right to refuse or deny a treatment, patient can't request or demand treatment.

The doctor can offer treatment option (1), which the patient may decline; they may then offer treatment (2) which may be more acceptable to the patient. However, the choice is always the patient's.
Last edited by ecolier; 2 years ago
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he3456
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(Original post by ecolier)
(Original post by he3456)
One of the pillars of medical ethics is autonomy. This means that the patient has the right to make the decision and must agree, this also means the doctor can't impose treatment on an individual for any reason unless the patient is unable to decide themselves, so does this mean that the doctor can't be biased to one form of treatment than another?[//quote]

Of course the doctor can be biased - they need to evaluate based on the effective of the treatment: the risks vs the benefits. There will never be 2 forms of treatment that will be exactly the same.



I think you have got some stuff misunderstood. Autonomy is the patient's right to refuse or deny a treatment, patient can't request or demand treatment.

The doctor can offer treatment option (1), which the patient may decline; they may then offer treatment (2) which may be more acceptable to the patient. However, the choice is always the patient's.
So, autonomy is the right to refuse treatment? And then by offering different treatment options, is the doctor practicing beneficence, since he/she is doing what is best for the patient (patient's best interest?)
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ecolier
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(Original post by he3456)
So, autonomy is the right to refuse treatment?
Not just that, it's the right to choose what happens to your body. It also includes a right to privacy (and confidentiality - it's not a pillar in itself!)

And then by offering different treatment options, is the doctor practicing beneficence, since he/she is doing what is best for the patient (patient's best interest?)
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Yes.

Something to read:
(1) https://postgradmedic.com/feed-artic...medical-ethics
(2) https://www.uniadmissions.co.uk/four...ics-interview/
(3) if you have time!! https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/employ...1-key-concepts
(4) if you have time!! https://www.gmc-uk.org/ethical-guidance
Last edited by ecolier; 2 years ago
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