Uni fee cuts from 2021... should I delay going to uni? Watch

PQ
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#21
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#21
Not just graduate salary - the graduate salary of students who graduated during a recession. So hardly a good predictor for current students (unless the government believes that we’re heading for decades of recession...)
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Roving Fish
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#22
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#22
(Original post by PQ)
(unless the government believes that we’re heading for decades of recession...)
I wonder what might cause that...
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SarcAndSpark
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#23
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(Original post by PQ)
Not just graduate salary - the graduate salary of students who graduated during a recession. So hardly a good predictor for current students (unless the government believes that we’re heading for decades of recession...)
I mean, if we crash out of the EU without a deal...
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PQ
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#24
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
I mean, if we crash out of the EU without a deal...
well yes....but that might be a very different sort of recession to the current one (for example the booming creative economy could become something that the government would need to invest in and supply with trained graduates - even if the pay isn't great for many of those jobs :flute: , likewise agriculture might benefit from more training that just the latest theme from the Archers but again not high chances of repaying loans...).

Base your decision on what degrees are "of value" based on a low income jobs during a recession cause by collapse of finance and debt and it's not a great way to plan for the future.
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DrSocSciences
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#25
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Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
Last edited by DrSocSciences; 1 month ago
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SarcAndSpark
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#26
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(Original post by PQ)
well yes....but that might be a very different sort of recession to the current one (for example the booming creative economy could become something that the government would need to invest in and supply with trained graduates - even if the pay isn't great for many of those jobs :flute: , likewise agriculture might benefit from more training that just the latest theme from the Archers but again not high chances of repaying loans...).

Base your decision on what degrees are "of value" based on a low income jobs during a recession cause by collapse of finance and debt and it's not a great way to plan for the future.
I totally agree that it's not a good way to decide which degrees have "value". There are a lot graduate roles that people work in that are pretty essential to society (I'm thinking health care, social work, etc.) where people are never going to earn mega-bucks- I'd argue that if you want to make a society wide value judgement then it should be about the value your degree adds to society. This could be in the form of services (as in the degrees mentioned above), wellbeing and making the world a nice place to live (e.g. arts), tax or future potential innovation (STEM)- but it shouldn't just be based on earning potential at all.

FWIW I think degrees in agriculture can really add value, but with the current state of UK farming, some grads will never even start their loan repayments. Unfortunately, I don't think Brexit will help them- a lot of the farms I know are only hanging on because of EU subsidy.

But I'll stop derailing the thread now.
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PQ
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#27
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(Original post by DrSocSciences)
Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
It's only a tax if you never completely repay - if you're wealthy enough to repay within the period then it's a debt (the quicker you repay the smaller the interest charged - hence the suggestion in Augar of the 1.2* cap on debt because the current setup has an unintended consequence that the 9th percentile of earners were paying less over 30 or 40 years than the 8th percentile).
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DrSocSciences
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#28
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#28
Yes I understand that. For the majority, however, there's blanket miscomprehension about the basic structuring of the facility.
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JohanGRK
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#29
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#29
(Original post by DrSocSciences)
Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
Your “repayment” is determined by your salary not by the size of your debt. It’s a tax.
Ctrl V not working as it should?
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DrSocSciences
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#30
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Ctrl V not working as it should?
No, I just get bored by the lack of comprehension.
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Jacqueline Bryce
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#31
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why would I want to delay, you may have less debt at the end of your studies but paying for an extra 10 years - No Thank You. At the very least I would want to try and see what I would be paying now and what I would pay then in total
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