OCR A level Chemistry Paper 1 Transition elements desperate help needed !!!!! Watch

Loreto2018
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Hey guys I have my physical chemistry exam in 3 days (OCR) and I am really confused about what I have to learn for the Transition element/ligand substitution reactions. My Textbook and school notes are very different and I'm really confused about what we have to know in terms of colour changes and ligand substitution reactions . Any help would be much appreciated thanks.
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flumefan1
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I also have this exam and I can't help you either I am so sorry!! Good luck with the exam though, I suck at transition elements too (so then why am I going over Year 12 equilibrium)??
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Loreto2018
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(Original post by flumefan1)
I also have this exam and I can't help you either I am so sorry!! Good luck with the exam though, I suck at transition elements too (so then why am I going over Year 12 equilibrium)??
I also find myself going over a lot of year 12 stuff too. I think its because we find it much easier and we neglect the harder year 13 content. Good luck to you too!
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dx31
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Check the spec!!
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flumefan1
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(Original post by Loreto2018)
I also find myself going over a lot of year 12 stuff too. I think its because we find it much easier and we neglect the harder year 13 content. Good luck to you too!
I hate the Year 13 stuff with a passion. also I don't understand organic reaction mechanisms :/ Thank you, I'm gonna need it!
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zaladman
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Agreed, this is the your holy bible for Chemistry, follow it and it only, what you have to learn for transition metals isn't actually that much either, I'd say the hardest part is probably learning all the colours for the different oxidation states, also note one of the transition metals (can't remember the name) isn't actually a transition metal because it doesn't form an ion with an incomplete d-sub shell!
(Original post by dx31)
Check the spec!!
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zaladman
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What don't you understand about the mechanisms? I'll try to help you if you want? I hope I can lol.
(Original post by flumefan1)
I hate the Year 13 stuff with a passion. also I don't understand organic reaction mechanisms :/ Thank you, I'm gonna need it!
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flumefan1
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Scandium & Zinc aren't transition metals
(Original post by zaladman)
Agreed, this is the your holy bible for Chemistry, follow it and it only, what you have to learn for transition metals isn't actually that much either, I'd say the hardest part is probably learning all the colours for the different oxidation states, also note one of the transition metals (can't remember the name) isn't actually a transition metal because it doesn't form an ion with an incomplete d-sub shell!
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flumefan1
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(Original post by zaladman)
What don't you understand about the mechanisms? I'll try to help you if you want? I hope I can lol.
I understand what's going on, I just can't draw them and often get 0 marks on questions about them. Also I can't remember synthetic routes://
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Loreto2018
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(Original post by zaladman)
Agreed, this is the your holy bible for Chemistry, follow it and it only, what you have to learn for transition metals isn't actually that much either, I'd say the hardest part is probably learning all the colours for the different oxidation states, also note one of the transition metals (can't remember the name) isn't actually a transition metal because it doesn't form an ion with an incomplete d-sub shell!
On the spec, it says we only need to know the ligand substitution reactions of copper and chromium, but my textbook says more and I just dida past paper and one of the questions was asking me about Cobalt?
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zaladman
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The best way imo to practice synthetic routes is to do practice questions on them AFTER you've the read the book on it.
If you're having trouble drawing the reaction mechanisms, always remember the arrows show the movement of electrons, so let's say nucleophilic addition is occurring (e.g a Br ion is moving to a carbo-cation) you have to draw a curly arrow going from the electrons (or the negative sign) directly to the positive sign of the carbon atom or the carbon atom itself.
Now let's also say you're trying to form and intermediate for benzene mechanism, this is where the drawing does get a bit tricky, you have to draw the curly arrow going from the specific area in the ring to which the electrophile is going to bond, and then ring will be positively charged temporarily
(Original post by flumefan1)
I understand what's going on, I just can't draw them and often get 0 marks on questions about them. Also I can't remember synthetic routes://
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zaladman
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Ah, but the spec also states "(l) interpretation and prediction of unfamiliar reactions including ligand substitution, precipitation, redox."
(Original post by Loreto2018)
On the spec, it says we only need to know the ligand substitution reactions of copper and chromium, but my textbook says more and I just dida past paper and one of the questions was asking me about Cobalt?
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Loreto2018
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(Original post by flumefan1)
I understand what's going on, I just can't draw them and often get 0 marks on questions about them. Also I can't remember synthetic routes://
Do you have like a flowchart with all of the synthetic routes? If so learn that off by heart or stick it on your bedroom wall. Once you have it learnt then you can pretty much answer any 6 mark organic question they decide to throw at us. If you are struggling to draw them out, always do it in displayed formula, I find that always helps me because I cant stand skeletal and structural.
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flumefan1
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Cobalt is mentioned in the textbook in the Year 12 sections, it isn't really on the spec but all you need to know about it according to my physical chem teacher is that it goes from pink to blue (I think don't quote me correct me if I'm wrong). Are you doing OCR?
(Original post by Loreto2018)
On the spec, it says we only need to know the ligand substitution reactions of copper and chromium, but my textbook says more and I just dida past paper and one of the questions was asking me about Cobalt?
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rm.25
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(Original post by Loreto2018)
On the spec, it says we only need to know the ligand substitution reactions of copper and chromium, but my textbook says more and I just dida past paper and one of the questions was asking me about Cobalt?
oh yea I did that question what paper was it again??
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zaladman
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There's one provided by ocr, it is very useful and the same pdf contains all the routes you need to know (including aromatic) and you can even annotate your own, I'll try to find the link for it.
(Original post by Loreto2018)
Do you have like a flowchart with all of the synthetic routes? If so learn that off by heart or stick it on your bedroom wall. Once you have it learnt then you can pretty much answer any 6 mark organic question they decide to throw at us. If you are struggling to draw them out, always do it in displayed formula, I find that always helps me because I cant stand skeletal and structural.
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flumefan1
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Thank you!!
(Original post by zaladman)
The best way imo to practice synthetic routes is to do practice questions on them AFTER you've the read the book on it.
If you're having trouble drawing the reaction mechanisms, always remember the arrows show the movement of electrons, so let's say nucleophilic addition is occurring (e.g a Br ion is moving to a carbo-cation) you have to draw a curly arrow going from the electrons (or the negative sign) directly to the positive sign of the carbon atom or the carbon atom itself.
Now let's also say you're trying to form and intermediate for benzene mechanism, this is where the drawing does get a bit tricky, you have to draw the curly arrow going from the specific area in the ring to which the electrophile is going to bond, and then ring will be positively charged temporarily
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zaladman
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https://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/359182...n-pathways.pdf
This is one of the most useful things i found in my a level studies, however i did have to annotate first one to include the type of reaction (e.g, reduction/oxidation/alkaline hydrolysis)
(Original post by zaladman)
There's one provided by ocr, it is very useful and the same pdf contains all the routes you need to know (including aromatic) and you can even annotate your own, I'll try to find the link for it.
Last edited by zaladman; 4 months ago
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Loreto2018
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It was practice paper set 2, I thought the multiple choice section was so easy, the second half wasn't bad but I just made so many stupid mistakes.
(Original post by rm.25)
oh yea I did that question what paper was it again??
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rm.25
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(Original post by Loreto2018)
It was practice paper set 2, I thought the multiple choice section was so easy, the second half wasn't bad but I just made so many stupid mistakes.
yh same I made silly mistakes on the multiple choice bit
Last edited by rm.25; 4 months ago
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