Should Donald Trump be commenting on British Politics?

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aliferra
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-48487973

The President of the States has recently made several comments regarding UK politics, in particular his views on Brexit. He has also commented on the conservative leadership contest. Is it appropriate for him to be making these comments? Although it may not seem like a big deal, his comments will inevitably have an influence in how people will vote in general elections and leadership contests, because many people, though I struggle to understand why, are supportive of Trumps world views. Trump has also been vocal on his support for the Brexit Party, in particular, Nigel Farage.

I personally don't think it is right that a president, who has been embroiled in a controversy concerning the interference of other countries (Russia) in elections, now feels that they should publicly make comments on UK electoral preceding.

Feel free to share your thoughts on this issue.
Last edited by aliferra; 9 months ago
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clickypen
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I think it is at the very least unproffessional, because if Boris doesn't win then the next PM will know that Trump doesn't think they were the best option for the job.

Obama did weigh in on Brexit in the past, albeit on the remain side - https://www.theguardian.com/politics...or-trade-talks . He was, of course, heavily criticised for this by those campaigning to Leave.

However, imo Obama was less in the wrong, for the simple fact that it is likely he was more informed on the Brexit debate than Trump is on the leadership election. I don't believe that Trump has weighed up the pros and cons of all of the candidates and, after measured debate with his advisors, concluded Boris was the best option.
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londonmyst
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I think it is helpful to hear the opinions and some commentary about uk politics from the usa leader himself.
Not sure how helpful Conservative leadership candidates will consider some of the remarks though.

America is one of the uk's strongest allies, continuing to strengthen the "special relationship" requires a clear understanding of the Trump administration's preferences and aims.
President Trump is not an experienced career politician constrained by diplomatic training and seems committed to doing things in his own unique style.
That way, at least members of government has the opportunity to familiarize themselves with his viewpoint and the priorities of his administration that he is willing to share.
As opposed to being forced to rely upon off the record remarks, the assessments of career diplomats and the content of summit discussions.

According to his eldest daughter, President Trump is in the habit of saying whatever he feels like saying with little hesitation or any thought of sticking to an official script.
This is unlikely to change while he is in office.
The constitutional right to free speech in the US has led to a culture where many americans over 45 years old are very willing to provide frank opinions and social commentaries.
So many people from other countries don't understand the British tradition of polite silences, very reserved speech and carefully choreographed interviews.
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AperfectBalance
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"should the leader of the worlds most powerful country talk about other countries politics"... obviously he should
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nulli tertius
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No he shouldn't and in other times we would send a severe diplomatic note about it.

However, given Trump's character it is a better to shut up on the basis that with the exception of a few juvenile fan boys (and the one thing the Conservative Party membership is not is juvenile) getting Trump's support is a bit like receiving Pol Pot's endorsement.

Major's government made a big mistake when it started looking for dirt on Clinton at the behest of the Bush Snr campaign.

Obama and Trump were perfectly entitled to comment on Brexit because it impacts on their economies; commenting on the political process in an ally, is a no, no.
Last edited by nulli tertius; 9 months ago
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Apachecow
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Do you see the irony - "should the US president talk about UK politics", I know I'll start a thread asking about US politics?!

Of course he should.
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barnetlad
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He is supporting a US born person to be the UK Prime Minister. He supports a man with little or no morals when it comes to behaviour towards women. He supports a man who has angered Iran. Seems at least he is consistent with his own values and behaviour.

I think our interference in US politics should be over gun control. Make our views clear.
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Notoriety
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Well, he's a famed gum-flapper of the highest order. It is more foolish to think that he has an informed opinion about BoJo or British politics, i.e. to give his senility rants any attention whatsoever.
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aliferra
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(Original post by Apachecow)
Do you see the irony - "should the US president talk about UK politics", I know I'll start a thread asking about US politics?!

Of course he should.
There is a difference between maintaining a political view, whether these be left or right wing, and intentionally seeking to influence British voters by commenting on candidates for leadership, including Nigel Farage anr Boris Johnson. 'Talking about' British Politics and making a decision to attempt to influence voters by identifying individuals and their parties, are two very different things.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by clickypen)
I think it is at the very least unproffessional, because if Boris doesn't win then the next PM will know that Trump doesn't think they were the best option for the job.

Obama did weigh in on Brexit in the past, albeit on the remain side - https://www.theguardian.com/politics...or-trade-talks . He was, of course, heavily criticised for this by those campaigning to Leave.

However, imo Obama was less in the wrong, for the simple fact that it is likely he was more informed on the Brexit debate than Trump is on the leadership election. I don't believe that Trump has weighed up the pros and cons of all of the candidates and, after measured debate with his advisors, concluded Boris was the best option.
You are correct, Obama was extremely well informed on all matters brexit, by his pal Cameron.

https://news.sky.com/story/cameron-p...rning-11423669

What's good for the goose and all that.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by aliferra)
There is a difference between maintaining a political view, whether these be left or right wing, and intentionally seeking to influence British voters by commenting on candidates for leadership, including Nigel Farage anr Boris Johnson. 'Talking about' British Politics and making a decision to attempt to influence voters by identifying individuals and their parties, are two very different things.
Please see post #10.
Here's a less "right wing" version for you.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politi...obama-12836776
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Unexpectedly
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Yes, he should, but only if our politicians can comment on issues in the US like gun control without him throwing his toys out the pram.
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clickypen
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(Original post by ColinDent)
You are correct, Obama was extremely well informed on all matters brexit, by his pal Cameron.

https://news.sky.com/story/cameron-p...rning-11423669

What's good for the goose and all that.
Obama also has a degree in Political science and International Relations, so at the very least would have had a laymans understanding of the EU and how it worked. He'd also been the President for 8 years at that point, and wouldn't have made a statement like that unless he was independently confident of its validity.

Obama's statement was confined to the relationship between the US and a post-Brexit UK. He simply stated that the UK on its own would have less bargaining power with the US than the EU as a bloc. This is a statement he was perfectly qualified and entitled to make, because he was the Head of State of the US at the time.

Contrastingly, Trump's statements were his opinions on what the UK should do both in terms of leadership and negotiations with the EU. He was telling the UK how to govern. If Theresa May had said publicly that he (for example) shouldn't use his unelected, unqualified family members as his official representatives, you can bet your bottom dollar Trump would've thrown a fit.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by clickypen)
Obama also has a degree in Political science and International Relations, so at the very least would have had a laymans understanding of the EU and how it worked. He'd also been the President for 8 years at that point, and wouldn't have made a statement like that unless he was independently confident of its validity.

Obama's statement was confined to the relationship between the US and a post-Brexit UK. He simply stated that the UK on its own would have less bargaining power with the US than the EU as a bloc. This is a statement he was perfectly qualified and entitled to make, because he was the Head of State of the US at the time.

Contrastingly, Trump's statements were his opinions on what the UK should do both in terms of leadership and negotiations with the EU. He was telling the UK how to govern. If Theresa May had said publicly that he (for example) shouldn't use his unelected, unqualified family members as his official representatives, you can bet your bottom dollar Trump would've thrown a fit.
Oh I don't doubt most of that, but he still waded into a debate that did not concern his country directly, and using verbiage penned by Mr Cameron too.
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clickypen
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(Original post by ColinDent)
Oh I don't doubt most of that, but he still waded into a debate that did not concern his country directly, and using verbiage penned by Mr Cameron too.
There was a debate going on in the run-up to the referendum about the UK's potential relationship with the US. Obama gave his opininion on that debate, speaking on behalf of the US. The remarks he made specifically impacted the US.

How much influence Cameron had on his wording, I don't know.
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Wōden
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(Original post by barnetlad)
He is supporting a US born person to be the UK Prime Minister. He supports a man with little or no morals when it comes to behaviour towards women. He supports a man who has angered Iran. Seems at least he is consistent with his own values and behaviour.

I think our interference in US politics should be over gun control. Make our views clear.
Waste of time. Their gun laws are their own business, and quite honestly, nobody is ever going to convince the American public at large to give up the 2nd Amendment, they don't give a **** what people from other nations think.

I'd rather the American state was taken to task over issues that actually have an impact on the rest of the world, for example; their disasterous foreign policy, their lackadaisical approach to environmental concerns, or their financial and cultural imperialism over the world (McDonaldization).
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ColinDent
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(Original post by clickypen)
There was a debate going on in the run-up to the referendum about the UK's potential relationship with the US. Obama gave his opininion on that debate, speaking on behalf of the US. The remarks he made specifically impacted the US.

How much influence Cameron had on his wording, I don't know.
He was clearly trying to influence the vote, that cannot be denied.
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