Should religious schools be allowed?? Watch

JoeCUK
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With all the wars and animosity religions have/can cause; should UK schools all be neutral with no honus to religion and no specific denomination referenced ????opinions please
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sridia
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Yes. You can argue that some religions have done far more good for humanity than any western political philosophy has done, including the likes of liberalism and socialism. Furthermore most of the Jewish and Hindu schools would be based on ethnic patronship rather than purely ideological thought.
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Compost
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No. Education should be about learning about the world and other cultures. Allowing religious schools creates division and prevents understanding of other view points. You'd never dream of allowing a school for adherents of, for instance, a single political party, so why are religions allowed state money to indoctrinate children?

Article 14 of the UN convention of the rights of the child says:
Every child has the right to think and believe what they choose and also to practise their religion, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights.
I don't see how sending them to a faith school when they may not follow that faith allows them to do this. Through my childhood I spent nearly 2000 hours taking part in someone else's religion, much of it in school assemblies. Whilst it was highly unsuccessful as a means of indoctrination, it was also a waste of my time.
Last edited by Compost; 1 month ago
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Alexty28
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Christian Schools should be as they are more compatible with our culture and society, others teach values that go against our cultural standards and values.
Can't wait for the backlash on this
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Unexpectedly
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Multi religious schools seem like a fair compromise in this situation.
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biofrance
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It wouldn't seem sensible to, upon seeing religion-based conflict, just get rid of religious schools. I don't think it's the answer as it's not solving the problem.
It would be much more effective, to (somehow) change people's approach to different religions, by exposing them to them. This would definitely raise tolerance levels towards different groups of people and in turn could reduce conflict. It's easier said than done, but in an ideal world...

On the other hand - with schools being the main place where kids interact with other kids - do religious schools segregate children of one religion from those of another? If all schools were mixed-religion or "neutral", children would end up being passively exposed to a much wider variety of religions. For that reason, schools that are not religion-specific might be the ones that raise a generation more tolerant of different religious backgrounds, because after all, interaction is the first step to understanding.

I definitely don't think the subject of religion should be avoided in schools; this would be likely to create even more tension. If kids are exposed to kids from other religious backgrounds, society will start to get more and more cohesive and mutual understanding will start to rise.

I stand by the fact that people should be allowed to practise the religions they want, whether that be just in personal life or through school life too. Religious involvement shouldn't be limited by making all schools a religion-free zone. Those that don't want to go to religious schools don't have to, but for others it can be extremely enriching. It's not religion that causes conflicts, but people's perceptions and approaches towards them, so that's what needs to be fixed.
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salimyasin10
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Whats the problem? It clearly doesnt affect results as Al-hijrah school in Birmingham has some of the highest results in the country
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sridia
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(Original post by salimyasin10)
Whats the problem? It clearly doesnt affect results as Al-hijrah school in Birmingham has some of the highest results in the country
And results aren't the most important thing for society to worry about, especially from a more macroeconomic viewpoint.
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ColinDent
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No, religion is used to indoctrinate young people for whatever shite thing certain people believe is better than other people's shite thing.
Yes some people find good in religion, but just one person dying in the name of some fictional character or other outweighs any good, and millions have died in the name of religion, if not billions, so as someone with no faith whatsoever I would prefer religion to be a personal choice rather than a forced one.
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Trotsky's Iceaxe
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(Original post by salimyasin10)
Whats the problem? It clearly doesnt affect results as Al-hijrah school in Birmingham has some of the highest results in the country
I'm not sure a school that is earmarked for closure this September because it is so backwards is a good example to use.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan...ngham-47090045
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Compost
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(Original post by biofrance)
I definitely don't think the subject of religion should be avoided in schools;

Those that don't want to go to religious schools don't have to,
There's a massive difference between teaching about religions in school and having religious schools.

It's mainly parents who pick schools, not children. You can be sent to a religious school at 11 and have worked out years before you leave that school that you neither believe in nor support that religion.
Last edited by Compost; 1 month ago
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DJKL
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(Original post by Compost)
No. Education should be about learning about the world and other cultures. Allowing religious schools creates division and prevents understanding of other view points. You'd never dream of allowing a school for adherents of, for instance, a single political party, so why are religions allowed state money to indoctrinate children?


I don't see how sending them to a faith school when they may not follow that faith allows them to do this. Through my childhood I spent nearly 2000 hours taking part in someone else's religion, much of it in school assemblies. Whilst it was highly unsuccessful as a means of indoctrination, it was also a waste of my time.
Well, certainly the RC schools my children attended covered comparative religions, in fact you may find that schools with a religious ethos are more likely to cover other religions in class discussions which may well assist understanding of other faiths.

There is a strong argument for those studying both English Literature and History beyond school level to have an awareness of The Bible, Edinburgh University had it on the pre reading list for those going there to study English Literature when I matriculated.

I attended a non denominational school but at least came out the end having a reasonable knowledge of The Bible and some understanding of other religions and differing Christian viewpoints, a handy bit of knowledge when say studying the Reformation in Europe. Attending a service every morning and having RE classes certainly did not indoctrinate me, I have no religious faith but can at least get a fair few allusions in say Metaphysical Poetry or when reading Milton, and the differing doctrinal viewpoints of Catholics, Protestants and their myriad factions, be they Anabaptists etc, are not outwith my understanding- one can study things without agreeing with them.
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clouddbubbles
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nah having been educated at a catholic school (not being strictly catholic, just baptised) I disagree.

its turned me into a much more understanding and loving person and I feel like the curriculum has been enhanced by the faith.
yeah, I was grumpy about being obliged to do re at gcse, but it's important to know about religion to avoid FUTURE conflict :dontknow:
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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I don't think banning religious schools is the answer. As I've said on previous versions of this thread topic: I think religious schools should be allowed to exist in the UK; however, they should be monitored extremely closely, carefully and regularly. They should have to teach - and be examined on - faiths other than their own. RE/RS should almost certainly be broadened out into religious education/studies AND philosophy, rather than being purely RE/RS. There should ideally be some kinda inter-faith programme between schools in the local area, with visits to places of worship in other faiths.

Above all, though, there should be strict and stringent monitoring of what religious schools are teaching young people - particularly in science, RS/RE, and PSHCE. There also should be proper, comprehensive and thorough sex and relationships education programme (and yes - including teaching that families are diverse in nature and that same-sex parenting is a thing) :yep:
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Compost
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(Original post by clouddbubbles)
nah having been educated at a catholic school (not being strictly catholic, just baptised) I disagree.

its turned me into a much more understanding and loving person
How can you tell? Do you think that non-Roman Catholic schools are devoid of ethics?
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Obolinda
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lol, my school is actually calm. The only thing that makes it religious is the assemblies and the crosses hung up. As well as compulsory RS. I go to a CofE. RS lessons are neutral
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clouddbubbles
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(Original post by Compost)
How can you tell? Do you think that non-Roman Catholic schools are devoid of ethics?
ohh noo not at all. but as far as I'm aware the 'ethos' for my school has been more about compassion and love, whereas other schools might have an ethos of success, determination and teamwork?

all in all it's pretty neutral, and mostly made me question my religion if anything
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