SyZ7OC
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#1
Hello everyone hope you're all doing well,
I am 15 and doing my GCSEs next year. I'm in year 10. I know I am very far away from achieving my life goal which as the title suggests, becoming a fighter pilot. After my A-levels Im planning to study either aerospace engineering or aeronautical engineering it being a BEng.

My question is, would having a degree in aerospace engineering and owning a PPL help in becoming a pilot ? Also, how does the streaming process work after EFT? How does the OASC Pilot selection work? I want to find out as soon as possible to make sure Im prepared in the next 7 years (Yeah, I know, this is very far away). Also, any tips for me?
Thank you.
Last edited by SyZ7OC; 9 months ago
0
reply
Surnia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 months ago
#2
As qualifications, a degree and PPL will make no difference to your application; people make it as pilots without those. What a degree will do is give you a higher qualification to fall back on if your application doesn't work out, and a few years at uni to mature and get involved in activities to develop your leadership skills and show you can take on responsibilities: committees, coaching, mentoring, volunteering, part-time jobs, UAS. Are you doing similar activities at the moment, like cadets, scouts, or things at school like prefect or clubs?

You'll get streamed on the ability you show through EFT, but there's no point concerning yourself about that now. If you want more detail on joining, like the selection process, Google is your friend! The RAF Recruitment website is a good start, and there's plenty of information on here and elsewhere on the internet. Youll need to learn how and where to research for interview. Also, visit your local AFCO, but go with sensible questions; they aren't there to tell you everything so show you have done some work and just need help with info you genuinely can't find.
0
reply
SyZ7OC
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#3
Awesome thanks. I have been attending cadets for the past 2 years, however, I haven't been down since February. I want to go back, the reason why I didn't attend was because of this dude I don't like, he always started at me and annoyed me. I think I'm going to come down soon.
As to the PPL question, isn't a PPL going to give me a slight advantage during EFT as I basically already know how to fly a single engine aircraft?
Also wouldn't the RAF recruitment look at the qualifications acquired and select someone over another person?
ALSO is there a chance that the RAF will close the applications to the pilot role due to not recruiting in 7 years or so?
Thanks
(Original post by Surnia)
As qualifications, a degree and PPL will make no difference to your application; people make it as pilots without those. What a degree will do is give you a higher qualification to fall back on if your application doesn't work out, and a few years at uni to mature and get involved in activities to develop your leadership skills and show you can take on responsibilities: committees, coaching, mentoring, volunteering, part-time jobs, UAS. Are you doing similar activities at the moment, like cadets, scouts, or things at school like prefect or clubs?

You'll get streamed on the ability you show through EFT, but there's no point concerning yourself about that now. If you want more detail on joining, like the selection process, Google is your friend! The RAF Recruitment website is a good start, and there's plenty of information on here and elsewhere on the internet. Youll need to learn how and where to research for interview. Also, visit your local AFCO, but go with sensible questions; they aren't there to tell you everything so show you have done some work and just need help with info you genuinely can't find.
Last edited by SyZ7OC; 9 months ago
0
reply
AlphaTango
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 months ago
#4
(Original post by SyZ7OC)
Awesome thanks. I have been attending cadets for the past 2 years, however, I haven't been down since February. I want to go back, the reason why I didn't attend was because of this dude I don't like, he always started at me and annoyed me. I think I'm going to come down soon.
You can’t let an individual impact your own goals.
As to the PPL question, isn't a PPL going to give me a slight advantage during EFT as I basically already know how to fly a single engine aircraft?
It isn’t an advantage in selection, if selected it will be a minor advantage to start but you may have also learnt bad habits and those without experience will catch up rapidly.
Also wouldn't the RAF recruitment look at the qualifications acquired and select someone over another person?
How you perform on selection is more important than what qualification you hold.
ALSO is there a chance that the RAF will close the applications to the pilot role due to not recruiting in 7 years or so?
Very unlikely the RAF will ever stop recruiting Pilots within our lifetime.
Thanks
Answered in bold.
0
reply
NFI
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 months ago
#5
Every person I know from flying training who had previous experience, be it UAS, PPL and even a CPL, only found the very basic sorties easy. After that they were on the same learning curve as everyone else because the way the military teaches is not the same way you learn as a civvy. If anything it made it harder for them to adapt quickly because they were not used to being told they weren’t actually that good.
0
reply
RAF_Adam
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 9 months ago
#6
(Original post by SyZ7OC)
Hello everyone hope you're all doing well,
I am 15 and doing my GCSEs next year. I'm in year 10. I know I am very far away from achieving my life goal which as the title suggests, becoming a fighter pilot. After my A-levels Im planning to study either aerospace engineering or aeronautical engineering it being a BEng.

My question is, would having a degree in aerospace engineering and owning a PPL help in becoming a pilot ? Also, how does the streaming process work after EFT? How does the OASC Pilot selection work? I want to find out as soon as possible to make sure Im prepared in the next 7 years (Yeah, I know, this is very far away). Also, any tips for me?
Thank you.
Hi

I can't really add anything more than has already been advised to you as the guys answering have a breadth of knowledge about the process.

I will add that having a PPL isn't necessary, the RAF trains all its pilots from scratch and as has already been said, the detail is that military flying is different to civ flying in certain ways and you're trained accordingly.

As long as you meet all of the entry and eligibility requirements for the role as listed on the RAF Recruitment website at the time then you'll be able to apply. It's how you do at OASC that will determine entry as a pilot.

Kind regards
Adam
RAF Recruitment
0
reply
SyZ7OC
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#7
thank you very much for the reply especially on the Recruting of pilots questions that bothered me a bit. Thanks
(Original post by AlphaTango)
Answered in bold.
0
reply
SyZ7OC
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#8
Oh damn didn't expect raf recruitment here ha ha thank you for the reply
(Original post by RAF_Adam)
Hi

I can't really add anything more than has already been advised to you as the guys answering have a breadth of knowledge about the process.

I will add that having a PPL isn't necessary, the RAF trains all its pilots from scratch and as has already been said, the detail is that military flying is different to civ flying in certain ways and you're trained accordingly.

As long as you meet all of the entry and eligibility requirements for the role as listed on the RAF Recruitment website at the time then you'll be able to apply. It's how you do at OASC that will determine entry as a pilot.

Kind regards
Adam
RAF Recruitment
0
reply
SyZ7OC
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#9
I see, honestly I'd like to get my PPL ASAP just so I can start flying as that's really what I want to do but yeah I see. Civvys definetly have a different approach when it comes to flight training. Thank you for the reply
(Original post by NFI)
Every person I know from flying training who had previous experience, be it UAS, PPL and even a CPL, only found the very basic sorties easy. After that they were on the same learning curve as everyone else because the way the military teaches is not the same way you learn as a civvy. If anything it made it harder for them to adapt quickly because they were not used to being told they weren’t actually that good.
0
reply
NFI
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report 9 months ago
#10
(Original post by SyZ7OC)
I see, honestly I'd like to get my PPL ASAP just so I can start flying as that's really what I want to do but yeah I see. Civvys definetly have a different approach when it comes to flight training. Thank you for the reply
Worth also considering that if you’re on a military flying training course then you will probably not be able to undertake any civvy flying so your currencies may lapse leading to a greater cost to regain currency to fly civvy again at the end of training.
0
reply
SyZ7OC
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#11
You mean WHILE getting military trained or even before that? I'm a little confused here ha ha
(Original post by NFI)
Worth also considering that if you’re on a military flying training course then you will probably not be able to undertake any civvy flying so your currencies may lapse leading to a greater cost to regain currency to fly civvy again at the end of training.
0
reply
threeportdrift
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 9 months ago
#12
(Original post by SyZ7OC)
You mean WHILE getting military trained or even before that? I'm a little confused here ha ha
He means during/while training, but that's not true, you'd easily be able to do the annual civvie hours during flying training, which takes up very few weekends. But civilian flying and military flying are entirely different. There used to be a very strong school of thought that discouraged any civilian flying training before starting military flying because of the bad/sloppy habits that were developed. I was certainly rejected from the UAS for two years running because I'd already got a PPL. BFTS certainly used to prefer complete ab initios than re-teaching those that had done some civilian flying.

Unless you are flying at a very high level, ie air displays, or have your own plane, I can't think why you'd bother with civvie flying while in military flying training. It's like being given a chef and a limitless food supply and still making your own sandwiches.
0
reply
Schleigg
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#13
Report 9 months ago
#13
(Original post by threeportdrift)
Unless you are flying at a very high level, ie air displays, or have your own plane, I can't think why you'd bother with civvie flying while in military flying training. It's like being given a chef and a limitless food supply and still making your own sandwiches.
Because if you're eating your own sandwiches you can eat them in your pants on your sofa and get crumbs everywhere, whereas having a top chef requires you to wear a suit and tie and sit at a fancy restaurant table and use proper table manners. I think there's a lot to be said about flying for pleasure versus flying for work.
1
reply
threeportdrift
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report 9 months ago
#14
(Original post by Schleigg)
Because if you're eating your own sandwiches you can eat them in your pants on your sofa and get crumbs everywhere, whereas having a top chef requires you to wear a suit and tie and sit at a fancy restaurant table and use proper table manners. I think there's a lot to be said about flying for pleasure versus flying for work.
If you are given a top chef he works in your kitchen and you can still eat in your pants on your sofa!
0
reply
NFI
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#15
Report 9 months ago
#15
(Original post by threeportdrift)
He means during/while training, but that's not true, you'd easily be able to do the annual civvie hours during flying training, which takes up very few weekends.
The direction is no mixing of types during training. All the FW PPLs I knew at Shawbury went un-current during RW training and had to retake skills tests when they got out the other side.
0
reply
username4547046
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#16
Report 8 months ago
#16
Just a few things that may or may not be of help for you:

The first assessed sortie is Stalling 1, I think. Every sortie up to then is basic stuff that you will probably do in a PPL (effects of controls, straight and level etc), but note it will not be assessed. After that, you'll learn circuits (which are different from military circuits) PFLs, etc. So getting a PPL will likely not help as once you are assessed, you will be doing new things that won't be covered in the same sense as a PPL. If anything, it will likely hinder you I would say.

In addition, if you have done some searching, you should have found that the new EFT platform is the Prefect, which is a turbo-prop. Not like the piston aircraft you'll do a PPL in. There are many more reasons why a PPL won't help your flying.

In my estimation, getting a PPL would help in selection contrary from some have said. It shows that you have a serious interest in flying, which can only be good when the interviews start. It might also help build up your mental capacity for your aptitude tests.

If you want to do a degree, just do UAS flying. You get paid for it, and you learn on an (albeit piston) aircraft which was a previous EFT platform, learning all the same competencies like you would on EFT. It's the only thing that would help in my opinion during EFT. PPLs wouldn't.

As for the degree, I would say the most common degree people apply with is Aero Eng. But I don't see any reason why having a different degree will disadvantage you, in fact I know a lot of people who have different or no degrees who past selection.

Best of luck for the future bud
0
reply
Surnia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#17
Report 8 months ago
#17
(Original post by gregolf)
Just a few things that may or may not be of help for you:

The first assessed sortie is Stalling 1, I think. Every sortie up to then is basic stuff that you will probably do in a PPL (effects of controls, straight and level etc), but note it will not be assessed. After that, you'll learn circuits (which are different from military circuits) PFLs, etc. So getting a PPL will likely not help as once you are assessed, you will be doing new things that won't be covered in the same sense as a PPL. If anything, it will likely hinder you I would say.

In addition, if you have done some searching, you should have found that the new EFT platform is the Prefect, which is a turbo-prop. Not like the piston aircraft you'll do a PPL in. There are many more reasons why a PPL won't help your flying.

In my estimation, getting a PPL would help in selection contrary from some have said. It shows that you have a serious interest in flying, which can only be good when the interviews start. It might also help build up your mental capacity for your aptitude tests.

If you want to do a degree, just do UAS flying. You get paid for it, and you learn on an (albeit piston) aircraft which was a previous EFT platform, learning all the same competencies like you would on EFT. It's the only thing that would help in my opinion during EFT. PPLs wouldn't.

As for the degree, I would say the most common degree people apply with is Aero Eng. But I don't see any reason why having a different degree will disadvantage you, in fact I know a lot of people who have different or no degrees who past selection.

Best of luck for the future bud
What is your estimation based on, compared to those with service and recruiting experience who have already responded about a PPL? The only time it will crop up during interviews is if the interviewee mentions it as an interest, it is of so little importance during selection. Recruiters are interested in candidates showing leadership potential and knowledge of the RAF, their chosen role, training etc. A PPL doesn't show someone has a serious interest in being a pilot in the RAF, won't make up for a poor showing in anything else or be factored in if someone is very average and in a sift, for example.

Of course no-one is disadvantaged by their degree if it's not a specific academic requirement, nor does Aero Eng help with a pilot application! We often say on here about having qualifications to fall back on, and not everyone wants to do engineering if they don't make pilot. I saw more pilot applicants with A-levels than degrees, and those with degrees were more oriented to subjects like geography, sports, and even geology.
Last edited by Surnia; 8 months ago
0
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#18
Report 8 months ago
#18
(Original post by Surnia)
and those with degrees were more oriented to subjects like geography, sports, and even geology.
My UAS had people who then joined the RAF as pilots with degrees as diverse as Geography, History, Architecture, Aero Eng, Portuguese, Business, Economics, and Physics.
And they ranged from high firsts to 'pass' in results, too...
0
reply
SyZ7OC
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#19
Sorry for my very late reply. I'm definetly planning on going UAS when I go university. Thanks.
(Original post by gregolf)
Just a few things that may or may not be of help for you:

The first assessed sortie is Stalling 1, I think. Every sortie up to then is basic stuff that you will probably do in a PPL (effects of controls, straight and level etc), but note it will not be assessed. After that, you'll learn circuits (which are different from military circuits) PFLs, etc. So getting a PPL will likely not help as once you are assessed, you will be doing new things that won't be covered in the same sense as a PPL. If anything, it will likely hinder you I would say.

In addition, if you have done some searching, you should have found that the new EFT platform is the Prefect, which is a turbo-prop. Not like the piston aircraft you'll do a PPL in. There are many more reasons why a PPL won't help your flying.

In my estimation, getting a PPL would help in selection contrary from some have said. It shows that you have a serious interest in flying, which can only be good when the interviews start. It might also help build up your mental capacity for your aptitude tests.

If you want to do a degree, just do UAS flying. You get paid for it, and you learn on an (albeit piston) aircraft which was a previous EFT platform, learning all the same competencies like you would on EFT. It's the only thing that would help in my opinion during EFT. PPLs wouldn't.

As for the degree, I would say the most common degree people apply with is Aero Eng. But I don't see any reason why having a different degree will disadvantage you, in fact I know a lot of people who have different or no degrees who past selection.

Best of luck for the future bud
0
reply
Devon Dad
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#20
Report 7 months ago
#20
If you were to join the Household cavalry they would prefer you not to have ridden before, if you learn to drive an instructor would rather start with you as a total novice, in both cases, no bad habits ! And on the plus side if you get your wings you can get a PPL "on the side" if you join one of the Armed forces aero clubs. (A lot cheaper)
(Original post by SyZ7OC)
Sorry for my very late reply. I'm definetly planning on going UAS when I go university. Thanks.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you worried that a cap in student numbers would affect your place at uni?

Yes (222)
60.82%
No (77)
21.1%
Not sure (66)
18.08%

Watched Threads

View All