Why can barium carbonate precipitate dissolve in water ?

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lewis.h
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I understand that the salt in :

Metal carbonate + Acid ---> Salt + Carbon Dioxide + Water

Will be a soluble salt, and I could accept that Barium carbonate would dissolve in it if it were a soluble salt.

But if it's a precipitate, AKA an insoluble salt, then why can it dissolve in water ?

Thanks.
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Ashelrunescape
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Because it is a solid state and is less dense than water i think?? Its mostly due to the fact its insoluble. Similar to how most solid metals are insoluble or lipids. Its just an observation I guess
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cofio
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(Original post by lewis.h)
I understand that the salt in :

Metal carbonate + Acid ---> Salt + Carbon Dioxide + Water

Will be a soluble salt, and I could accept that Barium carbonate would dissolve in it if it were a soluble salt.

But if it's a precipitate, AKA an insoluble salt, then why can it dissolve in water ?

Thanks.
You understand wrong. In our set pracs we have to make a soluble salt in this way, but also make an insoluble salt, and that is just a precipiatet reaction. If the salt is insoluble it won't dissolve.
If you tried the method with something that would make an insoluble salt e.g. Barium carbonate with sulfuric acid, the barium sulfate would form a solid coat over the barium carbonate so the reaction would then slow down or stop.
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lewis.h
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(Original post by cofio)
You understand wrong. In our set pracs we have to make a soluble salt in this way, but also make an insoluble salt, and that is just a precipiatet reaction. If the salt is insoluble it won't dissolve.
If you tried the method with something that would make an insoluble salt e.g. Barium carbonate with sulfuric acid, the barium sulfate would form a solid coat over the barium carbonate so the reaction would then slow down or stop.
Ok, so I had a misconception.

But why does the precipitate dissolve when hydrochloride acid is added to it to form a colourless solutions of Ba2+ ions ; what is the solvent in this solution ?
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cofio
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You are mixing up a chemical reaction with dissolving, which is a physical change. Barium carbonate is insoluble and barium chloride is soluble. You cannot get barium carbonate to dissolve in water, but if you add hydrochloric acid there is a chemical reaction which turns barium carbonate into barium chloride. Because barium chloride is soluble this dissolves. The solvent in the water that is present in the acid solution.
(Original post by lewis.h)
Ok, so I had a misconception.

But why does the precipitate dissolve when hydrochloride acid is added to it to form a colourless solutions of Ba2+ ions ; what is the solvent in this solution ?
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