Students may have to apply after A levels Watch

Loreto2018
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#21
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I absolutely agree with this change because if you don't do as well in the first year and come out with poor predicted grades, you are very limited in what you can apply to and this really has a detrimental effect to one's confidence heading into the second year of A level study, which could cause some students to lack motivation and perform badly in exams.
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Just my opinion
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Jpw1097)
Why do you think school should start later? After all, one part of going to school is to prepare you for work later in life where you will undoubtedly have early starts.
Never mind. If labour get in you may only be working 10hrs a week 👍anyway.https://metro.co.uk/2019/06/10/plan-...abour-9878450/
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Kinyonga
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#23
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(Original post by TheTroll73)
What about oxbridge, I mean they could be considered exceptions because they have interviews.

But I think for oxbridge applications should be after results and interviews in early september since uni terms start in october anyway.
Wouldn't really work from the pov of the students applying... Imagine doing an interview in early September, and being told a week before you're due to start that you've been declined. Also complicates matters if you've applied to unis which start term in Sept.
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HanimalGurl
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#24
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Some schools still do actual as exams then use them as an extra push to get into uni
(Original post by JohanGRK)
Or you could bring back ASs...
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travelcollegeguy
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#25
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How would this work with people studying BETC courses though i wonder
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Jpw1097
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#26
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
Never mind. If labour get in you may only be working 10hrs a week 👍anyway.https://metro.co.uk/2019/06/10/plan-...abour-9878450/
Good one, that’s pretty funny.
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Jpw1097
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#27
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
Front page of today's Telegraph

""Students may soon have to apply for a university place after receiving their A-level grades.
Under plans to overhaul the admission system a watchdog for higher education is to launch a review later this year into the recruitment system after concerns from ministers that some universities were guilty of unethical practices.
It suspected many where pressure selling unconditional offers in order to maximize revenue by recruiting as many students as possible."

This has been the situation for a while and it was only a matter of time until something was done. In 2012 there were roughly 2500 unconditionals made, last year there were over 60,000. Students are now 30 times more likely to receive one than just five years ago.
It's a gravytrain that everyone involved is desperate to keep rolling.
Does this mean that students would be forced to take a gap year or should the process be changed so that students can start university at the same time (or perhaps a bit later in the year)?
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TheTroll73
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#28
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(Original post by Kinyonga)
Wouldn't really work from the pov of the students applying... Imagine doing an interview in early September, and being told a week before you're due to start that you've been declined. Also complicates matters if you've applied to unis which start term in Sept.
You're right...

A possible solution is to have all A level exams 1 month sooner so receiving results 1 month sooner. I wouldn't see being declined t in mid/late-august to be too much of a problem as I would still see being able to apply to 5 uni courses possible, and already having the grades oxbridge applicants really should be able to have at least another uni offer from the likes of imperial.
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CoolCavy
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#29
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I got an unconditional through interview through portfolio but am not saying all of that again as have done so many times.
Making everyone apply after they have their results (am assuming that is what is being said here) seems unfeasible in some situations. I personally could not have afforded a gap year and jobs are becoming harder and harder to find. You have to apply like 200 times just to get into a retail summer job.
It was fine how it was when predictions were made upon AS grades but they were scrapped and here we are.
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erhcdes
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#30
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(Original post by Jpw1097)
Why do you think school should start later? After all, one part of going to school is to prepare you for work later in life where you will undoubtedly have early starts.
Don't know for sure or anything since I'm not a biologist... I do essay subjects lol.
But pretty sure teenagers' natural body clocks are wired to fire up later in the day and shut down later at night. This shifts to more conventional work hours as you get older. So in terms of productivity for students (which are, ultimately, the majority of people in a school) it would really make more sense to have school start later.
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nulli tertius
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#31
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
Front page of today's Telegraph

""Students may soon have to apply for a university place after receiving their A-level grades.
Under plans to overhaul the admission system a watchdog for higher education is to launch a review later this year into the recruitment system after concerns from ministers that some universities were guilty of unethical practices.
It suspected many where pressure selling unconditional offers in order to maximize revenue by recruiting as many students as possible."

This has been the situation for a while and it was only a matter of time until something was done. In 2012 there were roughly 2500 unconditionals made, last year there were over 60,000. Students are now 30 times more likely to receive one than just five years ago.
It's a gravytrain that everyone involved is desperate to keep rolling.
"Students may soon..."

A review is starting in the Autumn. Let's say it reports next year. By then, there will be a new PM and a new Education Secretary. There may have been a general election or the government may be clinging on by its finger tips, unable to force through even its choice of wallpaper in the Palace of Westminster. Assume that a general election result defied the odds and unlike the last three elections returned a strong government with a stable majority. Legislation would be introduced late 2020; would pass Parliament in 2021 and at the earliest could be brought in for the school year 2021/22 for students starting university in Autumn 2022. A more realistic target date is Autumn 2023.

However, in Autumn 2023 we are more likely to be sitting here still discussing the finer points of Brexit.
Last edited by nulli tertius; 4 weeks ago
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Trapmoneybenny
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#32
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#32
(Original post by nulli tertius)
"Students may soon..."

A review is starting in the Autumn. Let's say it reports next year. By then, there will be a new PM and a new Education Secretary. There may have been a general election or the government may be clinging on by its finger tips, unable to force through even its choice of wallpaper in the Palace of Westminster. Assume that a general election result defied the odds and unlike the last three elections returned a strong government with a stable majority. Legislation would be introduced late 2020; would pass Parliament in 2021 and at the earliest could be brought in for the school year 2021/22 for students starting university in Autumn 2022. A more realistic target date is Autumn 2023.

However, in Autumn 2023 we are more likely to be sitting here still discussing the finer points of Brexit.
exactly, this is something that the current year 7s and maybe year 8s would be worrying about not me. By that time i'll be worrying about job prospects and how much hedonism i can squash in before i settle down.

A levels would be irrelevant
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DoNotMove
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#33
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(Original post by PunjabiCookie)
1. What if the concept of sixth/form college wasn't there and it was mandatory to stay on until you are 18. Vocational courses and apprenticeships could be part of the school curriculum for students who don't wish to pursue A Levels.... Just a thought :smile:
I think it would be difficult to make vocational courses and apprenticeships part of the school curriculum - there is such a variety in the things you can do an apprenticeship in, that it would be somewhat difficult to integrate them all into one big school system. Considering that most apprenticeships are ran by just normal business and companies, you wouldn't be able to bring them all into the system. Also consider people moving to other countries - I go to a day and boarding school and I know many people have come to England for secondary school and returned home for 'sixth form' or equivalent post-16 studies/work. If there were no GCSEs, people may return to their home countries with no real qualifications - true, they may have the knowledge, but it may be difficult to prove this.

Overall, I think it would be difficult to scrap GCSEs altogether - also consider the fact that if someone wants to move to another school after Y11, they would have no way of showing how good they are.
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DoNotMove
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#34
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Is there anything stopping the uni terms just being moved later, so that university starts in March or something, as it doesn't really have to line up with the normal academic year.
(Original post by Kinyonga)
Wouldn't really work from the pov of the students applying... Imagine doing an interview in early September, and being told a week before you're due to start that you've been declined. Also complicates matters if you've applied to unis which start term in Sept.
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Jpw1097
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#35
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(Original post by erhcdes)
Don't know for sure or anything since I'm not a biologist... I do essay subjects lol.
But pretty sure teenagers' natural body clocks are wired to fire up later in the day and shut down later at night. This shifts to more conventional work hours as you get older. So in terms of productivity for students (which are, ultimately, the majority of people in a school) it would really make more sense to have school start later.
Do you have any evidence supporting this statement?
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DoNotMove
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#36
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(Original post by Jpw1097)
Do you have any evidence supporting this statement?
https://www.neurologytimes.com/blog/...rcadian-rhythm
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mnot
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#37
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
Front page of today's Telegraph

""Students may soon have to apply for a university place after receiving their A-level grades.
Under plans to overhaul the admission system a watchdog for higher education is to launch a review later this year into the recruitment system after concerns from ministers that some universities were guilty of unethical practices.
It suspected many where pressure selling unconditional offers in order to maximize revenue by recruiting as many students as possible."

This has been the situation for a while and it was only a matter of time until something was done. In 2012 there were roughly 2500 unconditionals made, last year there were over 60,000. Students are now 30 times more likely to receive one than just five years ago.
It's a gravytrain that everyone involved is desperate to keep rolling.
the principle of this is very good, but i think to have a controlled fair admissions system would be very difficult in such a tight time span from receiving grades, applying, accepting, sorting accommodation, fees etc.

Unconditionals have now become common place and undermine academic achievement rather highlight a handful of the most talented/highest achievers.

The other problem is schools predicted grades aren't honest as some schools just placing predicted grades of AAA on candidates that have no chance, similarly some Unis entry requirements aren't honest. Personally i think more A-level data points would be better maybe split exams over 3/4 exam windows (and not allow resits) would be the best solution and yes im aware every 16/17 yo will complain about stress over worked etc... but the reality is if you go to Uni you'll likely have exams twice a year every year anyway. Having A-level grades from january & may in year 12 and January year 13 would enable Uni admission tutors to make a more accurate judgement.

But this will never happen anyway
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DragonsOfAsshai
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#38
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(Original post by mnot)
the principle of this is very good, but i think to have a controlled fair admissions system would be very difficult in such a tight time span from receiving grades, applying, accepting, sorting accommodation, fees etc.

Unconditionals have now become common place and undermine academic achievement rather highlight a handful of the most talented/highest achievers.

The other problem is schools predicted grades aren't honest as some schools just placing predicted grades of AAA on candidates that have no chance, similarly some Unis entry requirements aren't honest. Personally i think more A-level data points would be better maybe split exams over 3/4 exam windows (and not allow resits) would be the best solution and yes im aware every 16/17 yo will complain about stress over worked etc... but the reality is if you go to Uni you'll likely have exams twice a year every year anyway. Having A-level grades from january & may in year 12 and January year 13 would enable Uni admission tutors to make a more accurate judgement.

But this will never happen anyway
As an a level student having more exams is better than doing it all in one big go at the end of two years anyway...
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mnot
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#39
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(Original post by DragonsOfAsshai)
As an a level student having more exams is better than doing it all in one big go at the end of two years anyway...
When i did A-levels (Sept 2012-June 2014) they were changing the system so in my year 12 I had 2 exam windows, and then 1 in year 13, but Unis had all my year 12 scores which were actual results counting towards my final grade, hence provided a better marker for what i was going to achieve, and standard practise was your year 12 scores were your year 13 predicted grades and schools couldn't inflated predicted grades too much as Universities has half your A level scores already.

Personally i thought this was better, i just think re-sits should be banned or maybe max 1 resit per student. more just an fyi but more exam windows will also likely mean slightly more exams as when i did A levels there were 6 exams for math/further math a level and 4 exams in the sciences with 2 courseworks as well.
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DragonsOfAsshai
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(Original post by mnot)
When i did A-levels (Sept 2012-June 2014) they were changing the system so in my year 12 I had 2 exam windows, and then 1 in year 13, but Unis had all my year 12 scores which were actual results counting towards my final grade, hence provided a better marker for what i was going to achieve, and standard practise was your year 12 scores were your year 13 predicted grades and schools couldn't inflated predicted grades too much as Universities has half your A level scores already.

Personally i thought this was better, i just think re-sits should be banned or maybe max 1 resit per student. more just an fyi but more exam windows will also likely mean slightly more exams as when i did A levels there were 6 exams for math/further math a level and 4 exams in the sciences with 2 courseworks as well.
I still have to do 7 exams in total for maths/further maths and 3 in each of the sciences so it isn't that much of a jump I guess. However looking at the AS exams they looked quite repetitive.
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