jamesctu
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this is the question
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jamesctu
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this is the question
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charco
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(Original post by jamesctu)
this is the question
what don't you understand/know?
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jamesctu
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(Original post by charco)
what don't you understand/know?
how to answer this question
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jamesctu
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(Original post by charco)
what don't you understand/know?
is this the answer sir
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charco
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(Original post by jamesctu)
is this the answer sir
If you have studied organic chemistry you should know that the bromide atom in a bromoalkane can be substituted by an amine group -NH2 using ammonia. Another (by) product of the reaction is HBr which can react with excess ammonia (an acid base reaction) making ammonium bromide.

Most organic chemistry books would just ignore the ammonium bromide as it is of little consequence and write:

R-Br + NH3 ==> RNH2 + HBr

If you have two bromine atoms on the hydrocarbon chain (a dibromoalkane) this can happen twice:

Br-R-Br + 2NH3 ==> H2N-R-NH2 + 2HBr

In your example the hydrocarbon chain, R, has 6 carbons:

Br-(CH2)6-Br + 2NH3 ==> H2N-(CH2)6-NH2 + 2HBr
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jamesctu
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(Original post by charco)
If you have studied organic chemistry you should know that the bromide atom in a bromoalkane can be substituted by an amine group -NH2 using ammonia. Another (by) product of the reaction is HBr which can react with excess ammonia (an acid base reaction) making ammonium bromide.

Most organic chemistry books would just ignore the ammonium bromide as it is of little consequence and write:

R-Br + NH3 ==> RNH2 + HBr

If you have two bromine atoms on the hydrocarbon chain (a dibromoalkane) this can happen twice:

Br-R-Br + 2NH3 ==> H2N-R-NH2 + 2HBr

In your example the hydrocarbon chain, R, has 6 carbons:

Br-(CH2)6-Br + 2NH3 ==> H2N-(CH2)6-NH2 + 2HBr
than you
so i would get the correct marks by writing either one
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charco
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(Original post by jamesctu)
than you
so i would get the correct marks by writing either one
I would think so.
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jamesctu
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hi sir
for this question did i get full marks
Explain why 3-aminopentane is a stronger base than ammonia

two ethyl groups on either side increased electron density making it more available for protonation

justify the statement that there are no chiral centres in 3-aminopentane
there was no carbon attached to 4 diffrent groups so its not a chiral centre
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(Original post by jamesctu)
hi sir
for this question did i get full marks
Explain why 3-aminopentane is a stronger base than ammonia

two ethyl groups on either side increased electron density making it more available for protonation

justify the statement that there are no chiral centres in 3-aminopentane
there was no carbon attached to 4 diffrent groups so its not a chiral centre
Maybe include the nitrogen lone pair:

"The positive inductive effect (+I) of the two ethyl groups on either side of the amine group increases the electron density at the nitrogen lone pair making it more available for protonation."
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